Search Results for Edinburgh


Biographies

  1. Hutton James biography
    • Born: 3 June 1726 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 26 March 1797 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • James was born into a wealthy family for his father William was a merchant who held the office of Edinburgh city treasurer.
    • In 1736, when he was ten years old, James entered Edinburgh High School.
    • There he studied Latin, Greek and mathematics, and in November 1740, at the age of fourteen, he entered the University of Edinburgh.
    • At the University of Edinburgh Hutton was taught mathematics by Maclaurin and logic and metaphysics by John Stevenson.
    • Edinburgh 5 (1805), 39-99.','7]:- .
    • Hutton, deciding to take the training which involved the most chemistry, returned to the University of Edinburgh in November 1744 to undertake medical studies.
    • Probably for that reason he left Edinburgh and went to Paris where he continued his studies at the University.
    • It may have been that Hutton never intended to practice medicine as a career, or he may have decided to avoid Edinburgh for a while since that was where his illegitimate son was living.
    • For whatever reason he returned from Leiden to live in London rather than Edinburgh.
    • While in London, Hutton corresponded with James Davie who had been a school friend and was still living in Edinburgh.
    • They had made a chemical discovery while students in Edinburgh, discovering a way to make sal ammoniac, a chemical used in welding metal.
    • In the summer of 1750 Hutton visited Edinburgh, where he and James Davie set up a chemical works.
    • Edinburgh 5 (1805), 39-99.','7]:- .
    • It was the beginning of a period spanning thirteen years during which he made some trips to Edinburgh but spent most of his time farming and working on his theories of geology.
    • Hutton returned to live in Edinburgh in 1767, living in the family home with his three sisters.
    • The house in which Hutton lived in Edinburgh now became his laboratory as well as his home and he continued to pursue his theories of the history of the Earth.
    • He joined the committee in 1767 when it was based in Edinburgh where construction of the canal began, and remained on it until 1775 by which time the committee were based in Glasgow as the construction neared the Clyde.
    • Some time during 1784 the Royal Society of Edinburgh invited Hutton to give two lectures on his theory.
    • A printed version of Hutton's two lectures to the Royal Society of Edinburgh did not appear in print until 1788, but since the further evidence which Hutton had gathered in the years following his lectures is not mentioned one has to assume that the delay was in the printing of the paper in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh 5 (1805), 39-99.','7] gives this account:- .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  2. Terrot biography
    • Died: 2 April 1872 in Stockbridge, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • From the Royal Society of Edinburgh's Proceedings, with information provided by Kelland [',' Biography by G Stronach, in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 2004).','1]: .
    • Terrot's move to Edinburgh took place in 1817: he was to assist the Revd James Walker at St Peter's in Roxburgh Place.
    • During the next twenty years, his appointments grew in prestige: he was appointed Dean of Edinburgh and Fife in 1837; Rector of St Paul's in 1839; Pantonian Professor at the theological college, and Bishop of Edinburgh, in 1841 and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church in 1857.
    • Charles Hughes Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh; and George Grub, Professor of Law in the University of Aberdeen (Edinburgh, 1893).
    • Terrot was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1840, proposed for fellowship by J D Forbes.
    • Terrot delighted in good conversation and, according to the Revd Walker, in Edinburgh he had developed a 'very high reputation as a talker of the Johnsonian type'.
    • Charles Hughes Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh; and George Grub, Professor of Law in the University of Aberdeen (Edinburgh, 1893).
    • Terrot's contributions to the Royal Society of Edinburgh comprise the following papers (ordered by date of communication to the Society): .
    • The 1847 paper, in which Terrot gives an early account of the theory of complex numbers, attracted the attention of P G Tait while still a schoolboy at the Edinburgh Academy.
    • Certainly, the Royal Society of Edinburgh held Terrot's mathematical researches in this area in the highest regard [',' Biography by G Stronach, in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 2004).','1]: .
    • Charles Hughes Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh; and George Grub, Professor of Law in the University of Aberdeen (Edinburgh, 1893).
    • ','5] in the British Medical Journal suggests that Terrot, at some stage, taught at the Edinburgh Academy: .
    • Educated at the Edinburgh Academy, under the late Rev.
    • Terrot, afterwards Bishop of Edinburgh.
    • In Cassell's Old and New Edinburgh, [',' J Grant, Old and New Edinburgh: Its History, its People, and its Places, IV (London, 1881).
    • Charles Hughes Terrot, D.D., elected in 1857 'Primus' of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and whose quaint little figure, with shovel-hat and knee-breeches, was long familiar in the streets of Edinburgh.
    • Charles Hughes Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh; and George Grub, Professor of Law in the University of Aberdeen (Edinburgh, 1893).
    • Terrot was known to have had a close association with Archdeacon William's successor as Rector of the Edinburgh Academy, Dr John Hannah (1818-1888) who was a former Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford.
    • Hannah took great pleasure in familiarizing Terrot with 'Oxford forms of thought' at a time when the philosopher, Sir William Hamilton was promoting communication between Edinburgh and Oxford.
    • Terrot died at Stockbridge in Edinburgh on 2 April 1872, aged eighty-two.

  3. Tait biography
    • Died: 4 July 1901 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • However, when he was six years old his father died and Peter, with his two sisters and his mother, moved to Edinburgh to live with an uncle John Ronaldson.
    • An Edinburgh banker, John Ronaldson was nevertheless interested in science, in particular in astronomy, geology and with the newly invented photography.
    • When the family moved to Edinburgh Peter, of course, had to leave his school in Dalkeith.
    • He next attended a private school in Circus Place Edinburgh, then in 1841, when he was ten years old, he entered Edinburgh Academy.
    • Tait was top of his class in each one of his six years at Edinburgh Academy.
    • In 1846 he was placed first in the mathematics section of the Edinburgh Academical Club Prize which was no mean achievement given that he beat Lewis Campbell, who was placed second, and Maxwell who was placed third.
    • In 1847, Tait's final year at Edinburgh Academy, Maxwell had his revenge since he was placed first for the Edinburgh Academical Club Prize with Tait second.
    • At the age of 16, in November 1847, Tait entered the University of Edinburgh.
    • Maxwell entered Edinburgh University at the same time at Tait and together they attended the second mathematics class taught by Kelland and the natural philosophy (physics) class taught by James David Forbes.
    • Tait remained at Edinburgh University for only one year before entering Peterhouse, Cambridge in 1848.
    • The Chair of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh became vacant in 1859, J D Forbes having moved to the University of St Andrews.
    • When the Edinburgh paper, the Courant, reported the result it noted that Tait had been chosen in preference to Maxwell since:- .
    • By the time he arrived in Edinburgh in 1860 Tait was making strong contributions in applying Hamilton's quaternions.
    • In the year he took up the chair of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh he published Quaternion investigations connected with electro-dynamics and magnetism in which he reworked Helmholtz's hydrodynamic- electromagnetic analogy in the language of quaternions.
    • By 1863 when he published Note on a quaternion transformation in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Tait claimed that:- .
    • You should let the world know that the true source of mathematical methods as applicable to physics is to be found in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • a few days ago Tait showed me in Edinburgh a magnificent way of producing [vortex rings].
    • Tait, although at first unconvinced by Thomson's vortex atom theory, began to include the theory in his lecture courses at Edinburgh in the early 1870s and he gave popular lectures describing the theory.
    • He published seven papers on knots in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in the academic year 1876-77.
    • He returned to the topic of knots in his address to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1883:- .
    • Of course Tait's patriotism also meant that he was a devoted supporter of the Royal Society of Edinburgh which he served faithfully from the time he was elected a Fellow shortly after being appointed to the chair in Edinburgh.
    • 4.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1883 .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  4. Morgan Alexander biography
    • Born: 21 August 1860 in Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 17 March 1946 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He returned to Edinburgh where he studied at the Church of Scotland Training College and the University of Edinburgh.
    • degree from the University of Edinburgh.
    • On graduating M.A., Morgan was appointed a Lecturer in Mathematics at the Church of Scotland Training College, Edinburgh.
    • by the University of Edinburgh for his thesis The geometrical representation of elliptic integrals of the first kind.
    • Edinburgh Yearbook (1947), 25.','1] about Morgan's work at the Training College:- .
    • Edinburgh Yearbook (1947), 25.','1947] hundreds of workers in the field of Education, in Scotland and elsewhere, who look back with feelings of lively gratitude to their association with Dr Morgan in the Training College, and with sincere affection too for the man himself.
    • Edinburgh Yearbook (1947), 25.','1]:- .
    • He served as Convener of the Business Committee of the General Council of the University of Edinburgh for several years.
    • Morgan joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in November 1887.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 May 1896.
    • a former Principal and Director of Studies of Edinburgh Provincial Training College, Moray House, and for many years an outstanding figure in Scottish educational circles, died at his home in Edinburgh on Sunday night.
    • After his retirement from the Provincial Training College, his skill as an organiser and his experience as an administrator were freely put at the disposal of the General Council and the Court of the University of Edinburgh.
    • His early education was received at North Parish Church School, Aberdeen, and Old Aberdeen Grammar School, and after a period as a pupil-teacher in Aberdeen he went through two years of professional training in the Church of Scotland Training College, Edinburgh.
    • Proceeding to Edinburgh University, he graduated M.A.
    • Immediately after graduation in 1886 he was appointed a lecturer in the Edinburgh Training College, became Principal in 1903, and when the office of Director of Studies was created he combined the duties of that office with those of Principal.
    • From 1932 till 1939 Dr Morgan was one of the assessors elected by the Genera Council to the Edinburgh University Court and before joining the Court he rendered valuable service for some years as Convener of the Business Committee of the General Council.
    • In 1937 the University of Edinburgh conferred upon him the honorary degree of LLD.

  5. Alison biography
    • Died: 21 March 1952 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • John attended Gallatown Public School and from there he went to Edinburgh where he matriculated at the University and also studied at Moray House.
    • Alison was appointed as a Mathematics Master at The Edinburgh Academy in 1884.
    • Then in 1886 he was appointed to George Watson's College, Edinburgh, a post he held until 1902 when he moved to Glasgow to become Principal of the Glasgow United Free Church Training College.
    • EDINBURGH MASTER GETS A RECTORSHIP .
    • The Education Committee of the United Free Church have unanimously appointed Mr John Alison, M.A., F.R.S.E., Edinburgh, to the lectureship of the United Free Church Training College, Glasgow, in succession to Mr J Adams, now Professor of Education in London University.
    • He entered the teaching profession as a pupil-teacher under the Dysart School Board, and afterwards took the three years' course in Moray House Training College, Edinburgh, attaining first plaice in both the college and Government examinations.
    • In 1879 he entered Edinburgh University, and during the sessions from 1879 to 1884 gained distinction in Latin, Greek, logic, and mathematics.
    • After holding the post of second Mathematical master in Edinburgh Academy for the same length of time, he entered the service of the Edinburgh Merchant Company as second mathematical and science master in George Watson's College, and for the last ten years he has been head mathematical master in the same institution.
    • Mr Alison is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, was president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and was twice president of the Association of Teachers in Merchant Company Schools, Edinburgh.
    • After two years in Glasgow, Alison returned to Edinburgh in 1904 when he was appointed as Headmaster of George Watson's College.
    • The son of a schoolmaster, he was educated at Dysart, at Moray House Training College, and at the Edinburgh University, where he graduated Master of Arts.
    • Hew was an assistant master in the Practising School of Moray House Training College from 1882 to 1884, second mathematical master in the Edinburgh Academy from 1884 to 1886, second Mathematical and Science master in George Watson's College, Edinburgh, from 1886 to 1892, when he was promoted to the position of head mathematical master.
    • Mr Alison is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, has been president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and twice president of the Association of Teachers in the Merchant Company Schools.
    • In retirement he lived at 126 Craiglea Drive, Edinburgh.
    • A few years before he retired, in 1921, he was honoured by the University of Edinburgh when he was awarded an honorary LL.D.
    • Some fifty years ago the Merchant Company transformed its palatial hospitals into secondary schools of the modern type, a far-sighted reform which has materially contributed to the attractions of Edinburgh as ah educational centre.
    • Mr Alison's claim to University recognition is strengthened by the valuable work he has done on behalf of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and the sustained interest he has shown in all movements for improving the training of teachers and fostering the corporate sense of the scholastic profession.
    • Alison was an early member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1884 at the beginning of the third session of the new Society.
    • John Alison was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 April 1889, his proposers being John Sturgeon Mackay, George Chrystal, Robert M Ferguson, Alexander Yule Fraser.
    • An obituary, written by George Robertson, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1953, page 5.

  6. Sprague biography
    • Died: 29 November 1920 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Shelved at: VXL/73 rsl [IF archive] (Lon) [Faculty: Edinburgh University Library, Special Collections Department 072.1942 SPR] [RKN: 4587]','2].
    • [Faculty: Edinburgh University Library, Special Collections Department Pamphlet file, vol 13] [RKN: 70761]','4] which was introduced following the notorious insolvencies of both the Albert and the European life assurance companies.
    • Dr Sprague published some eighty papers in the Journal of the Institute of Actuaries and, including articles, Presidential Addresses, translations, comments and reviews for this and other actuarial journals (Transactions of the Faculty of Actuaries, Transactions of the Actuarial Society of Edinburgh), his published contributions to actuarial science must number over one hundred.
    • In addition, he published eight pure mathematical papers: [',' T B Sprague, On the nature of the curves whose intersections give the imaginary roots of an algebraic equation, Transactions of Royal Society of Edinburgh 30 (1882), 467-480.','16] and [',' T B Sprague, On a new algebra, by means of which permutations can be transformed in a variety of ways, and their properties investigated, Transactions of Royal Society of Edinburgh 37 (1893), 399-411.','17] in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and six papers in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society: [',' T B Sprague, Note on the evaluation of functions of the form 00, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1884).','18],[',' T B Sprague, On the different possible non-linear arrangements of eight men on a chess board, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1889).','19], [',' T B Sprague, On the transformation and classification of permutations, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1890).','20], [',' T B Sprague, On the geometrical interpretation of ii, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1893).','21], [',' T B Sprague, On the eight Queens’ problem, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1899).','22] and [',' T B Sprague, On the singular points of plane curves, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1902).','23].
    • The year before Sprague, in 1852, the Senior Wrangler and First Smith's Prizeman had been P G Tait (as well as the Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University and the founder of the mathematical theory of knots, Tait was a director of the Scottish Provident Institution, a life insurance company in Edinburgh) and the year after, in 1854, the world-famous physicist, Clerk Maxwell had been second Wrangler (Routh being the Senior), the two Smith's Prizes of 1854 being shared equally between these two eminent men.
    • Dr Sprague was the only person to have been President of both the Institute of Actuaries (1882-86) in London and the Faculty of Actuaries (1894-96) in Edinburgh.
    • He was also President of the Actuarial Society of Edinburgh on three occasions (1874, 1882 and 1891) and did much to mould the futures of all these bodies.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE) in 1874 [',' Royal Society of Edinburgh, Archive of Fellows,','9] and of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (EMS).
    • Dr Sprague was the actuary to the Equity and Law life insurance company from 1861-1873 when he was appointed to be Chief Executive (1873-1900) of the Scottish Equitable Life Assurance Society in Edinburgh (not to be confused with the Equitable Life Assurance Society in London) retiring from business life at age 70.
    • When President of the Institute of Actuaries, from 1882-86, he was resident in Edinburgh but travelled to London regularly to fulfil his role as President of the Institute.
    • Dr Sprague was invited by Clerk Maxwell (the latter being scientific editor, along with T H Huxley, of the 9th Edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica) to write the article on 'Annuities' [',' T B Sprague, Annuities, article in 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica (scientific eds, J Clerk Maxwell and T H Huxley) (A and C Black, Edinburgh, 1875).','11].
    • [Faculty: Edinburgh University Library, Special Collections Department 368.3 SPR Pamphlet file, vol 13 Pamphlet file, vol 44] [RKN: 70199]','13] which the 1870 Life Insurance Companies Act (see above) did much to ensure.

  7. Chrystal biography
    • Died: 3 November 1911 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Chrystal described his own experience at there [',' G Chrystal, Promoter’s Address to Graduates of Arts, University of Edinburgh, The Scotsman Edinburgh, 22 April 1885.','4]:- .
    • Chrystal wrote [',' G Chrystal, Promoter’s Address to Graduates of Arts, University of Edinburgh, The Scotsman Edinburgh, 11 April, 1908.','6]:- .
    • Before leaving for Germany to marry, Chrystal applied for the vacant chair of mathematics in the University of Edinburgh.
    • Chrystal chose as his subject The History of Mathematics, talking in particular about the former occupants of the Edinburgh chair of mathematics.
    • Chrystal was to hold the Edinburgh chair for the rest of his career.
    • He wrote [',' G Chrystal, Promoter’s Address to The Graduates in Arts and Science, University Of Edinburgh The Scotsman Edinburgh, 15 April, 1892.','5]:- .
    • Despite holding the chair of mathematics at Edinburgh, Chrystal continued his interest in experimental work there.
    • Edinburgh 32 (1911-12), 477.','3]:- .
    • Chrystal was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 February 1880.
    • Most of Chrystal's published papers appear in the publications of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • I hope you will by your presence support a deputation next week to the Secretary for Scotland to make a last appeal for justice to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in the matter of its accommodation.
    • The Treasury granted £25,000 for the purchase of 22-24 George Street in Edinburgh, and £3,000 to cover the cost of removal and equipment.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh was not the only Edinburgh Society with which Chrystal was closely connected.
    • His interest and support in setting up the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was important in the foundation of this Society.
    • Chrystal published three major papers on the subject in 1904, 1905 and 1906 which were all published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Recognition for his work on seiches came through the Gunning Victoria Award made to him by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, one of the most prestigious awards of the Society, and the Royal Medal by the Royal Society of London, confirmation of which came from the King just two hours after his death.
    • In [',' The Student (New Series) 4 (7) (3 December, 1890), 98.','26] he is described by the Edinburgh students of 1890:- .
    • The students of Edinburgh described the ageing Chrystal in 1907 [',' The Student (1906-07) (409) (8 February, 1907), 486-88.','27]:- .
    • 4.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1883 .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  8. Buchan biography
    • Born: 1904 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 10 January 1976 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Alexander attended Sciennes School, Edinburgh, in 1916, then George Heriot's School, Edinburgh, from 1916-1922.
    • After completing his studies at George Heriot's, Buchan entered the University of Edinburgh, matriculating in October 1922 when he entered the Faculty of Pure Science.
    • (Pure) with First Class Honours from Edinburgh on 20 July 1926 and became a mathematics teacher at Gillespie's School, Edinburgh.
    • After working between 1930 to 1935 as a teacher at the Royal High School, Edinburgh, Buchan then became Principal Teacher of Mathematics at James Gillespie's High School for Girls, Edinburgh.
    • He continued to have strong research interests in mathematics and, in 1939, he submitted his thesis Linear Combination of Data with Least Error of Differences to the University of Edinburgh and was awarded a Ph.D.
    • His thesis advisor at Edinburgh was Alexander Aitken.
    • His final appointment was as Principal Lecturer in Mathematics at Moray House College of Education, Edinburgh.
    • Alexander Buchan was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in February 1927.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1940, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Alexander Craig Aitken, David Gibb, Robert Schlapp.
    • An obituary, written by Douglas M Mcintosh, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1977, pages 27-28.
    • At a quarterly meeting of the Grand Lodge of Scotland held in Freemasons' Hall, Edinburgh, yesterday (Thursday 5 February 1948) - the Grand Master Mason, the Earl of Galloway, presiding - Mr Alexander Fairley Buchan, M.B.E., B.Sc.
    • Dr Buchan, who is 42 years of age, was formerly principal master of mathematics in James Gillespie's High School, and since then principal lecturer in mathematics and Master of Method in Moray House Training College, Edinburgh.
    • 2, Edinburgh.

  9. Carse biography
    • Born: 20 June 1880 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 20 August 1950 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • George Carse was brought up in Edinburgh, living at 120 Lauriston Place.
    • Then in 1891 he entered George Heriot's School, Edinburgh, being dux of the school in 1898.
    • Then, after having passed the Preliminary Examination, he first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1898.
    • During 1903-4 Carse undertook research in physics at Edinburgh and also acted as an assistant to J G MacGregor.
    • Carse then returned to Edinburgh where he was appointed as Lecturer in Natural Philosophy.
    • (Pure) in 1908 from Edinburgh.
    • Returning to his post in Edinburgh, Carse was promoted to Reader in Natural Philosophy in 1928.
    • Carse joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in session 1902-03 while he was working in the Physical Laboratory of the University of Edinburgh.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 21 November 1904, his proposers being James Gordon MacGregor, George Chrystal, Cargill Gilston Knott, William Peddie.
    • An obituary, written by A Melville Clark, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1951, pages 9-11.
    • A well-known Edinburgh educationist, Dr George Alexander Carse, has died suddenly.
    • at Edinburgh University in 1903.
    • He then proceeded to Emmanuel College Cambridge, and returned to Edinburgh in 1907 when he joined the University Staff as a lecturer under Professor Macgregor.
    • Dr Carse was first elected to the Board in 1927 as a representative of Edinburgh University and he filled a number of important offices.
    • They were also well served by him as their representative on outside bodies, particularly the Board of Governors of the Edinburgh and East of Scotland College of Agriculture, on which he served for 14 years, retiring in 1942, and the Heriot-Watt College, in which he took a special interest.

  10. Milne Archibald biography
    • Born: 30 April 1875 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 19 September 1958 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Archibald Milne's father was Archibald Milne (born Edinburgh about 1850) who was an upholsterer.
    • His mother was Lilias Milne (born Edinburgh about 1851).
    • Archibald Milne attended St James' Episcopal School, Broughton Street, Edinburgh.
    • He took the Edinburgh University Preliminary Examination, passing Latin and Greek at the Lower level and English, Mathematics, and Dynamics at the Higher level in October 1894, and then Higher Latin in April 1895.
    • He was an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh where he first matriculated in October 1894 after having passed the Preliminary Examination.
    • by the University of Edinburgh for his thesis The Confluent Hvpergeometric Function.
    • Milne was appointed to the Church of Scotland Training College in Edinburgh in 1899, becoming a Mathematical Lecturer there in 1903.
    • "It is now possible to obtain a complete free education from the infant school where all learn the interesting fact that a cat sat on a mat - right up to the University, with its many faculties and its numerous degrees." So said Dr Archibald Milne in an address at the formal closing concert of James Gillespie's Commercial Institute, held in the School Hall, Bruntsfield Links, Edinburgh, last night (Wednesday 20 March 1929).
    • In 1905 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and in 1910 was awarded the degree of D.Sc.
    • He is an original member of the Sir Walter Scott Club and of the Old Edinburgh Club, and a member of the Scottish Arts Club and the Society of Musicians.
    • In Masonry, he is a Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel) No.
    • Milne joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1898, shortly after graduating with his first degree.
    • He was also elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 23 January 1905, his proposers being George Chrystal, James Geikie, Simon Somerville Laurie, Alexander Morgan.
    • An obituary, written by J R Peddie, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1959/1960, pages 92-93.

  11. Butters biography
    • Born: 10 August 1863 in McDowall Street, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 11 January 1946 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He spent three years at the Old High School in Edinburgh, then five years and four months at George Heriot's School in Cowgate Port, Edinburgh, where he was a student teacher.
    • He first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1882 but as well as studying at the University he also attended courses at the Established Church Training College.
    • with First Class Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy from the University of Edinburgh in 1894, and a B.Sc.
    • He taught for a short period at Aberystwyth and then at James Gillespie's School, Edinburgh.
    • He became a mathematics teacher at George Heriot's School, Edinburgh, in 1888 [',' J B Clark, John Watt Butters, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, 17-18.','1]:- .
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 April 1896 having been proposed by Peter Guthrie Tait, George Chrystal, David Fowler Lowe, and John Sturgeon Mackay.
    • In 1899 Butters left George Heriot's School to take up an appointment as Rector of Ardrossan Academy, Ayrshire [',' J B Clark, John Watt Butters, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, 17-18.','1]:- .
    • After retiring he returned to his native city of Edinburgh, living at 116 Comiston Drive.
    • Butters joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1886.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.
    • His obituary in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh is at THIS LINK.
    • In [',' J B Clark, John Watt Butters, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, 17-18.','1] Butters' friend J B Clark writes:- .

  12. Philip Flora biography
    • Died: 14 August 1943 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • In 1883 she moved to Edinburgh where she studied with the Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women.
    • At a meeting of the Association on Wednesday 22 April 1885 at 15 Shandwick Place, Edinburgh, the Principal of Edinburgh University, Sir William Muir, presented the Edinburgh University Certificate in Arts to Flora Philip.
    • The Countess of Aberdeen, President of the Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women also gave a speech:- .
    • Flora Philip's main interests were mathematics and Greek and she was the first woman member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in December 1886 three years after the Society was founded.
    • Philip received further awards from the Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women on 18 April 1888 when they presented her with a Diploma for passing seven subjects.
    • The written examinations held at the Edinburgh centre had been conducted by Professor Kirkpatrick and the examination in class teaching by Professor Lawrie.
    • Philip was then appointed assistant mistress in St George's High School for Girls in Edinburgh, the founding of which was one of the Association's many enterprises and which was opened in 1888 at No.
    • Eight women received degrees at the Edinburgh University graduation ceremonial on13 April 1893 - the first Edinburgh ceremony at which women were capped.
    • and thereafter her life was that of the mother of a family and the wife of an Edinburgh Solicitor.
    • In the same year she stopped teaching and gave up her membership of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • At the graduation ceremonial in the M'Ewan Hall on the 2 July 1943 the three surviving members whose homes were in Edinburgh: Mrs George Stewart (Miss Flora Philip), 41 Learmonth Grove, Edinburgh; Miss Maude Elizabeth Newbigin, 2 Chamberlain Road, Edinburgh; and Miss Amelia Hutchison Stirling, 30 Howard Place, Edinburgh, were present on the platform by invitation of the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Thomas Holland:- .
    • I am sure that you will all join in congratulating these representatives of the first small group of women graduates who continued their educational activities in the Edinburgh area and are with us on the platform that morning.
    • She died at a nursing home in Edinburgh and was buried at Dean Cemetery.

  13. MacMillan Chrystal biography
    • Born: 13 June 1872 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 21 September 1937 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Macmillan then returned to Edinburgh and began her studies at Edinburgh University first matriculating in October 1892.
    • in April 1896 becoming the first woman graduate with a degree in science from Edinburgh.
    • After studying at the University of Berlin over the summer of 1896, Macmillan returned to Edinburgh and matriculated in the Faculty of Arts in October 1896 after passing the Preliminary Examination in Greek.
    • In this she scored another first, becoming the first woman to graduate from Edinburgh with First Class Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.
    • At this time the Scottish Universities (St Andrews, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh) elected four MPs to Parliament.
    • However, women were denied the right to vote for the first general election in which the university seat of Edinburgh and St Andrews was contested in February 1906.
    • Macmillan became the first woman to plead before the House of Lords [',' W N Boog Watson, The First Eight Ladies, University of Edinburgh Journal 23 (1967-1968), 227-234.','2]:- .
    • Macmillan joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in May 1897 when she was reading for her M.A.
    • at Edinburgh.
    • A Millennial plaque is at Kings Buildings (West Mains Road), in Edinburgh.
    • The University of Edinburgh has also named a building in her honour.
    • She died from heart disease at 8 Chalmers Crescent, Edinburgh, on 21 September 1937, and was cremated on 23 September in Edinburgh.

  14. Maclaurin biography
    • Died: 14 June 1746 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Despite being reinstated to his chair by the University of Aberdeen, Maclaurin sought a position in the University of Edinburgh.
    • James Gregory, not the famous mathematician of that name but rather the lesser known James Gregory (1666 - 1742) who was a brother of David Gregory, held the chair of mathematics at Edinburgh but had become too ill to carry out the work.
    • The University of Edinburgh sought to appoint someone to a joint professorship with James Gregory and, on 21 August 1725, Newton wrote to Maclaurin offering his support in recommending him for appointment to the post (see [',' J F Scott, Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (New York 1970-1990).
    • I am very glad to hear that you have the prospect of being joined with Mr James Gregory in the Professorship of Mathematics at Edinburgh, not only because you are my friend, but principally because of your abilities, you being acquainted as well with the improvements of Mathematics as with the former state of those sciences.
    • In November 1725 Newton wrote to John Campbell, the lord provost of Edinburgh, supporting Maclaurin's appointment (see [',' J F Scott, Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (New York 1970-1990).
    • There is no evidence to suggest that Edinburgh took Newton up on his offer to contribute to Maclaurin's salary.
    • Maclaurin began his appointment to the University of Edinburgh on 3 November 1725.
    • Maclaurin was to spend the rest of his career in Edinburgh.
    • Not long after his marriage, Maclaurin worked to expand the Medical Society of Edinburgh into a wider society to include other branches of learning.
    • This Society would, after Maclaurin's death, become the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • His teaching at the University of Edinburgh came in for considerable praise [',' Colin Maclaurin, Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Scotsmen III (Glasgow, 1872), 64-69.','7]:- .
    • Maclaurin played an active role in the defence of Edinburgh during the Jacobite rebellion of 1745.
    • As the Jacobite army marched towards Edinburgh in September 1745, Maclaurin worked endlessly in attempting to prepare the defences of the city.
    • The Jacobite army reached Edinburgh on 15 September 1745 and, after negotiations had failed, the gates of the city were opened.
    • When the Jacobite army marched south from Edinburgh, Maclaurin returned to the city in November 1745.
    • However, he was weakened by his exertions in preparing the defences of Edinburgh, by the difficult journeys to and from York, by the cold winter weather, and by a fall from his horse.
    • He died the following year in Edinburgh and was buried in Greyfriars Church where his grave can still be seen at the south-west corner.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  15. Archibald James biography
    • Born: 1862 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 16 November 1925 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Presentation to an Edinburgh Headmaster.
    • Mr James Archibald, MA, F.R.S.E., until recently headmaster of Dalry School, Edinburgh, has been made the recipient of gifts from the pupils and staff of the school, and from associates during his career as a teacher Mr Herbert, acting head master, made the presentation.
    • Beginning as a pupil-teacher in Stockbridge School, Edinburgh, he entered the Training College and Edinburgh University, where he had a distinguished career.
    • He had 47 years' service as a teacher, first under the Edinburgh School Board; and later under the Education Authority.
    • He first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in 1881 and graduated M.A.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1889.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 24 June 1907.
    • Death of Edinburgh ex-Headmaster.
    • The death occurred yesterday morning, at his residence, 31 Leamington Terrace, Edinburgh, of Mr James Archibald F.R.S.E., formerly headmaster of Dalry Road Public School.
    • Mr Archibald retired a year and a half ago, after spending 45 years as a teacher in Edinburgh.
    • He was keenly interested in mathematics, and for many years acted as treasurer of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, of which Society he was an ex-president.

  16. Stewart Dugald biography
    • Born: 22 November 1753 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 11 June 1823 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Dugald Stewart's father was Matthew Stewart who was Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh at the time Dugald was born.
    • He attended Edinburgh high school from 1761 to 1765 and then entered the University of Edinburgh where he took an arts degree although he attended courses in natural philosophy [',' S Grave, Dugald Stewart, in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy 8 (Collier-Macmillan, London, 1967), 16-17.','7]:- .
    • Stewart returned to Edinburgh in 1772 and by that time his father's health was deteriorating so Dugald Stewart assisted his father with teaching mathematics.
    • Although he was now the Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh, his interests were firmly in philosophy and he also taught moral philosophy at Edinburgh during session 1778-79 while Adam Ferguson was in America.
    • Stewart taught mathematics at Edinburgh for 13 years until Adam Ferguson resigned in 1785 when he was appointed to the philosophy chair and resigned from the chair of mathematics.
    • Stewart had been involved in an interesting controversy in 1805 over the appointment of Leslie to the chair of mathematics at Edinburgh.
    • Before his election the Edinburgh moderates had insinuated that Leslie was an atheist.
    • When they brought forward their own candidate, Thomas MacKnight, an Edinburgh clergyman, Stewart and Playfair protested against the uniting of clerical and academic posts and objected to the intended clerical domination of the University of Edinburgh on the pattern of St Andrews.
    • After Leslie's election the Edinburgh moderates, determined to oust Leslie, took the affair to the general assembly of the Church of Scotland, its highest forum, which decided in May 1805 by the narrow majority of 96 to 84 that the affair be dropped and Leslie be left undeposed from his mathematics chair.

  17. Johnstone biography
    • Born: June 1877 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 1935 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • David Johnstone's father was John Johnstone (born in Edinburgh about 1844) who was a printer compositor.
    • David Johnstone entered St Leonard's Public School, Edinburgh, in 1883.
    • He spent seven years at the school, followed by five years at George Heriot's Hospital School, Edinburgh.
    • In this latter school he was in the same class as Drysdale and the two became friends (they went together when they first matriculated at Edinburgh University and appear in the Matriculation Album as consecutative entries).
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, he first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1895.
    • Johnstone joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1900 after he graduated.
    • He taught there for over 20 years before moving to the Provincial Training College, Edinburgh on 1 October 1925.
    • Archibald Milne was the Principal Lecturer in charge of Mathematics at Edinburgh Provincial Committee for Teacher Training, that is Moray House; he was assisted by a lecturer who taught both Mathematics and Science.
    • In the Minutes [',' Minutes of the Edinburgh Provincial Committee for Teacher Training.','4] (dated 20/7/1925) it reported that Dr Milne was recommended for the appointment of Depute Director of Studies.
    • This post arose from the agreement between the University Court and the National Committee (to which Edinburgh Provincial Committee for Teacher Training reported and made recommendations) to jointly appoint to the post of Professor of Education and Director of Studies.
    • Mr Johnstone was Master of Arts of Edinburgh University with Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, and held also the B.Sc.
    • Johnstone joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1900 after he graduated.

  18. Hodge biography
    • Born: 17 June 1903 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • William Hodge's parents were Janet Vallance (born 1875), whose father William Vallance owned a confectionary business in Edinburgh, Scotland, and Archibald James Hodge (1869-1938) who worked in the property market as a partner in the firm Douglas and Company.
    • William was born at 1 Church Hill Place, Edinburgh, Scotland.
    • After leaving the kindergarten, Hodge's entire education was at George Watson's Boys College in Edinburgh, entering in 1909 and studying there until 1920.
    • This would require him to have a university degree so, as part of the plan, he prepared to sit the University of Edinburgh Bursary Competition.
    • Winning this mathematical bursary made him financially secure and allowed him to progress to become a student at Edinburgh University.
    • He matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1920 and was taught there by Whittaker and also became a fellow student of Whittaker's son, the talented John Whittaker.
    • After graduating with First Class Honours in mathematics from Edinburgh in 1923, he entered St John's College, Cambridge, in October of that year.
    • His studies at Cambridge were financed by a van Dunlop bursary which he had won from the University of Edinburgh and a £60 scholarship from St John's College.
    • The University of Cambridge came as a bit of a shock to the young Hodge who had been taught a rather old fashioned mathematics course at Edinburgh.
    • The explanation lies in the contrast between the way projective geometry was treated in Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • Whereas in Edinburgh it was an appendage to Euclidean geometry, White's course gave a comprehensive account of the synthetic approach, based on the axioms of incidence, and its relation to coordinate geometry.
    • In the previous year, on 27 July 1929, he had married Kathleen Anne Cameron, the daughter of Robert Stevenson Cameron, the manager of the Edinburgh branch of Oxford University Press.
    • He was chairman of the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh in August 1958.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and the American National Academy of Sciences.
    • He was awarded honorary degrees by many universities including Bristol (1957), Edinburgh (1958), Leicester (1959), Sheffield (1960), Exeter (1961), Wales (1961), and Liverpool (1961).
    • 8.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1954 .

  19. Playfair biography
    • On completion of his studies in 1769, he left the University, and from then on spent much of his time until 1773 in Edinburgh.
    • There he mixed with the luminaries of the Scottish Enlightenment (see [',' D Allan, Virtue, Learning and the Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh, 1993).','3]); which included such great scholars as Dugald Stewart the mathematician (son of Matthew Stewart), Adam Smith the economist, Joseph Black the chemist, James Hutton the geologist, Robert Adam the architect and engineer, and Principal Robinson the historian.
    • Having failed to obtain an academic post Playfair returned to Edinburgh where he remained until his father's death in 1772.
    • During this period Playfair did not neglect his own academic studies, and beside making occasional visits to Edinburgh, he made an excursion in 1774 to Schiehallion, Perthshire, to conduct experiments with Neville Maskelyne, the Astronomer Royal.
    • This involved moving closer to Edinburgh, and he was thus able to participate in the city's intellectual life.
    • Playfair became involved in the establishment of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1783 and was one of the original Fellows of that Society.
    • In 1785 Playfair was appointed Joint Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, a position which he was to hold for twenty years.
    • Two years later, after completing his tutoring duties for the Ferguson's, he moved to Edinburgh, joining his mother and sisters, who had for some years been resident in Edinburgh.
    • From 1787 Playfair published on various topics in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and also contributed to the Edinburgh Review.
    • In 1803 Playfair published his biographical sketch of Hutton in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Playfair was a successful teacher in his position as Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, lecturing with a verve for the subject, doing his utmost to inspire his students with an enthusiasm for mathematical investigation, and rewarding those who succeeded by praising them in front of the class.
    • He was described as a 'magnetic teacher' who [',' D Allan, Virtue, Learning and the Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh, 1993).','3]:- .
    • The Astronomical Institution of Edinburgh was founded in 1811, preceding the Royal Astronomical Society in England by nine years, making it the first British society devoted to astronomy.
    • In 1815 Playfair succeeded his friend and colleague, Professor Robison, as the Secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • He moved to Burntisland in Fife in 1818 after seeing work begin on the New Observatory for the Astronomical Institution of Edinburgh, in order to complete this essay.
    • While in Burntisland, he also wrote his Memoir on Naval Tactics, published posthumously in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • He regained his health sufficiently to finish the course of lectures in Edinburgh but, sadly, the second edition of the Illustrations was never completed.
    • Lord Henry Coburn wrote that Playfair was [',' H Coburn, Memorial’s of His Time (Edinburgh, 1861).','6]:- .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  20. McBride biography
    • Died: 6 September 1949 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He was also a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, being proposed for membership at the meeting on 9 December 1904 and, following the standard procedure, he became a member at the following meeting on 13 January 1905.
    • He gave a paper at the first meeting of the Society's 1905-06 session on 10 November 1905 in Edinburgh, the title being A trigonometric dial: a teaching appliance.
    • He served on the Committee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society from 1908 for five years until 1913.
    • In 1909 he published Two illustrations of Newton's Third Law in the Edinburgh Mathematical Society's Edinburgh Mathematical Notes.
    • The dynamic one gives an experimental solution to, what McBride calls the 'Climbing Monkey Problem' [',' J A M’Bride, Two illustrations of Newton’s Third Law, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 2 (1909), 16-18.','3]:- .
    • McBride writes [',' J A M’Bride, Two illustrations of Newton’s Third Law, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 2 (1909), 16-18.','3]:- .
    • In 1913, McBride attended the Mathematical Colloquium which was held in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University during the week beginning Monday 4 August 1913.
    • Unfortunately no record exists of all the participants in the 1914 Mathematical Colloquium also held in Edinburgh.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 8 March 1926, his proposers being Dugald Black McQuistan, Thomas Murray MacRobert, Sir Edmund T Whittaker, and W King Gillies.
    • An obituary, written by R A Robb, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book of 1950, page 27.
    • In this obituary, Robb gives a description of McBride's character [',' R A Robb, James Alexander McBride, B.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1950 (Edinburgh, 1951), 27.','4]:- .
    • From 1938 McBride gave his address as the Scottish Liberal Club, 109 Princes Street, Edinburgh.
    • Many solutions or none? A centenary account published in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes in January 1943.

  21. Maxwell biography
    • Born: 13 June 1831 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • James Clerk Maxwell was born at 14 India Street in Edinburgh, a house built by his parents in the 1820s, but shortly afterwards his family moved to their home at Glenlair in Kirkcudbrightshire about 20 km from Dumfries.
    • His parents plan that they would educate him at home until he was 13 years old, and that he would then be able to go the Edinburgh University, fell through.
    • A 16 year old boy was hired to act as tutor but the arrangement was not a successful one and it was decided that James should attend the Edinburgh Academy.
    • He attended Edinburgh Academy where he had the nickname 'Dafty'.
    • This became his first paper On the description of oval curves, and those having a plurality of foci which was read to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 April 1846.
    • Maxwell was not dux of the Edinburgh Academy, this honour going to Lewis Campbell who later became the professor of Greek at the University of St Andrews.
    • Tait, also at the University of Edinburgh, later wrote in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1879-80) [',' C W F Everitt, James Clerk Maxwell: Physicist and Natural Philosopher (New York, 1975).','7]:- .
    • The University of Edinburgh still has a record of books that Maxwell borrowed to take home while an undergraduate.
    • Again we quote Tait's article in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1879-80):- .
    • Maxwell travelled to Edinburgh for the Easter vacation of 1856 to be with his father and the two went together to Glenlair.
    • Maxwell and Tait had thought about the problem of Saturn's rings in 1847 while still pupils at the Edinburgh Academy.
    • When the Chair of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh became vacant in 1859, Forbes having moved to St Andrews, it seemed that fate had smiled on Maxwell to bring him back to his home town.
    • When the Edinburgh paper, the Courant, reported the result it noted that:- .
    • History Topics: A visit to Maxwell's house in Edinburgh.

  22. Ross biography
    • Died: 11 January 1947 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Edward Ross was six years old when his father died and at this time his mother moved from Maud, Aberdeenshire, to Edinburgh where he continued his schooling.
    • Educated at George Watson's School in Edinburgh, Ross was dux of the school in 1898, matriculating at the University of Edinburgh in October of that year.
    • The mathematics scholarship was divided between Edward Burns Ross, M.A., Edinburgh University, and Peter Fraser, M.A., Aberdeen University.
    • See [',' E T Whittaker, Edward Burns Ross, M.A., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1948/1949, 43.','1].
    • He then returned to Edinburgh, living at 41 Liberton Brae, where he was looked after by his sisters for the final 15 years of his life during which time his health continued to deteriorate.
    • Ross joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1903 and remained a member throughout his career in India, and his retirement to Edinburgh.
    • While still in Edinburgh he read his paper The contact of a member of a family of curves with the envelope to the Society at its meeting on Friday 13 January 1905.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Cargill Gilston Knott, Ellice Martin Horsburgh, David Gibb.
    • An obituary, written by Edmund Whittaker, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1948/1949, page 43.
    • The death has occurred at his home, 41 Liberton Brae, Edinburgh of Professor Edward Burns Ross, who in 1933 retired from the post of Professor of Mathematics in Madras Christian College.
    • Educated at Edinburgh University, where he graduated M.A., and subsequently at Cambridge, he was appointed to Madras College in 1906.
    • In 1915 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  23. Mackie biography
    • Born: 27 February 1888 in Leith, near Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 6 January 1955 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • John Mackie was brought up in Leith, near Edinburgh, and he studied at Leith Academy which he entered in 1899.
    • He attended the University of Edinburgh, first matriculating in October 1906.
    • After submitting his thesis An inquiry into the tetrad difference method of testing the two factor theory of intelligence to the University of Edinburgh, Mackie was awarded a D.Sc.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1929 having been proposed by Alexander Morgan, Godfrey Hilton Thomson, Sir Edmund Taylor Whittaker, and Ralph Allan Sampson.
    • Allen writes [',' T M M Allen, John Mackie obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 40 (1956) 27-28.','1]:- .
    • In February 1921 Mackie joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • At this time he was living at 19 Beresford Avenue, Leith, where he continued to live until 1938 when he moved to 7 York Road, Edinburgh.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.

  24. Napier biography
    • Born: 1550 in Merchiston Castle, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 4 April 1617 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • The above is quoted in [',' G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.','12] without reference to its origin.
    • Gibson, in [',' G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.','12], remarks however:- .
    • In fact Briggs did make the difficult journey from London to Edinburgh to see Napier in the summer of 1615 (would he have dreamed that now it takes 4 hours by train, rather than at least 4 days by horse and coach in those times).
    • A description of their meeting was told by John Marr to William Lilly who writes the following (see [',' G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.','12]):- .
    • Mr Briggs appoints a certain day when to meet at Edinburgh; but failing thereof, Merchiston was fearful he would not come.
    • Napier replied that he had the same idea but ([',' G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.','12]):- .
    • In fact Briggs spent a month with Napier on his first visit of 1615, made a second journey from London to Edinburgh to visit Napier again in 1616 and would have made yet a third visit the following year but Napier died in the spring before the planned summer visit.
    • and these are taken seriously in the biased biography [',' M Napier, Memoirs of John Napier of Merchiston, his lineage, life, and times, with a history of the invention of logarithms (Edinburgh, 1904).','7] written by Mark Napier, one of John Napier's descendants.

  25. Kennedy-Fraser biography
    • Born: 10 February 1888 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • His mother, Marjory, then lived in Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, with her own mother Elizabeth Kennedy and her two sisters Margaret and Jessie.
    • David Kennedy Fraser attended George Watson's Boys' College in his home town of Edinburgh from 1893 to 1904.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination for Edinburgh University, he first matriculated there in October 1904 at the age of sixteen.
    • When he first matriculated he gave his address as 3 Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, but it was scored out and replaced by 95A George Street, Edinburgh.
    • He then studied at the University of Leipzig and at Moray House in Edinburgh before going to the Cornell University in 1913 to study under G M Whipple.
    • D Kennedy Fraser, a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, was elected assistant professor in the department of education, on account of the coming retirement of Professor De Garmo.
    • Mr Fraser studied at the Teachers' Training College at Edinburgh and also at the University of Leipzig.
    • Dr D Kennedy-Fraser, a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, who was assistant in the educational laboratory in 1913 - 14, has been appointed assistant professor of education for the coming year.
    • Back in Scotland, Kennedy-Fraser was appointed as a Lecturer in Education at Edinburgh University in 1919 and also at Moray House.
    • David Kennedy Fraser joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1908 while he was still a student at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1929, his proposers being James Drever, George Alexander Carse, James Hartley Ashworth, Sir Edmund T Whittaker.
    • An obituary, written by 'A Former Colleague', appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1963, pages 18-19.

  26. Gray Marion biography
    • Died: 16 September 1979 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • She entered the University of Edinburgh in October 1919 after having passed Preliminary Examination and having won a bursary.
    • She graduated from Edinburgh on 13 July 1922 with an M.A.
    • During her final year at the University she gave her address as "c/o Miss Laidlaw, 16 East Mayfield, Edinburgh".
    • After spending two years undertaking research in Edinburgh, Gray went to Bryn Mawr College in the United States in 1924 where she undertook research with Anna Wheeler as her supervisor.
    • She returned to Scotland and, in July 1926, attended the St Andrews Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in University Hall, St Andrews.
    • Gray replaced A M Cassie during 1926-27 as an Assistant in Natural Philosophy in the Arts Faculty of Edinburgh University.
    • In the Edinburgh University Calendar she appears as staff under 'University Assistants, Arts, Natural Philosophy' in the period 1927/28 to 1929/30.
    • However, despite her name appearing in the Calendar in the last of these sessions, she left Edinburgh in 1927 and worked as an assistant in mathematics at Imperial College of Science and Technology, South Kensington, London for three years.
    • In 1925 E T Whittaker communicated the paper The equation of conduction of heat by Marion C Gray to the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Marion Gray joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in session 1921-22, while she was an undergraduate at Edinburgh, although she was formally elected in the meeting in December 1922.
    • She was elected to the Committee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in November 1923.
    • After she retired from the Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1967 she returned to Scotland where she lived in Edinburgh.

  27. Hardie Patrick biography
    • Born: January 1873 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 7 March 1943 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Patrick Hardie's father was George Hardie (born Edinburgh about 1835) who was a hat manufacturer.
    • Patrick Hardie's school education was at Newington School, Edinburgh, followed by George Heriot's School, Edinburgh.
    • He then studied at the University of Edinburgh, first matriculating in 1890.
    • Hardie joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1900 while at Sharp's Institution in Perth, Scotland.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1918, his proposers being William Peddie, David Fowler Lowe, Cargill Gilston Knott, Charles Tweedie.
    • An obituary, written by Sydney Smith, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1944, page 20.

  28. Stirling biography
    • Died: 5 December 1770 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • The terms of the Snell Exhibitions is described in [',' I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).','3]:- .
    • Based on this, together with information from Ramsay (see [',' J Ramsay, Scotland and Scotsmen in the Eighteenth Century (Edinburgh, 1888).','4]) who knew Stirling in later life and wrote that he was:- .
    • Tweddle [',' I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).','3] notes that a student with the name 'James Stirling' matriculated at the University of Edinburgh on 24 March 1710, did not graduate, and has a signature which is similar to that of the mathematician.
    • Another fact, which is not insignificant, is that Stirling's father was a graduate of Edinburgh.
    • 10 (1957), 117-158.','7] or [',' I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).','3]):- .
    • In the reply, dated 16 April 1738, and written from Edinburgh he explains why he has not replied sooner (see [',' T A Krasotkina, The correspondence of L Euler and J Stirling (Russian), Istor.-Mat.
    • 10 (1957), 117-158.','7] or [',' I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).','3]):- .
    • He certainly did not give up mathematics when he took up the post in the mining company, and in [',' I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).','3] there is a discussion of unpublished mathematical work in notebooks of Stirling that were probably written between 1730 and 1745.
    • The year 1745 was the date of the most major of the Jacobite rebellions and Maclaurin played an active role in the defence of Edinburgh against the Jacobites.
    • Charles Edward, the Young Pretender, entered Edinburgh with an army of 2,400 men on 17 September 1745.
    • In 1746 Maclaurin died, partly as a consequence of the battles of the previous year, and Stirling was considered for his chair at Edinburgh.
    • As Stirling's unpublished manuscripts show [',' I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).','3], he did go much further than the 1735 paper but probably the pressure of work at the mining company gave him too little time to polish the work.

  29. Wallace biography
    • Died: 28 April 1843 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He was brought up in Dysart until he was 16 years old, working there as an apprentice bookbinder, then in 1784 his family moved to Edinburgh.
    • Although he was not a student, Wallace did attend mathematics classes at Edinburgh University and both Robison and Playfair encouraged the young man who they realised had very considerable mathematical talents.
    • At this time Wallace began to publish mathematics and his first paper appeared in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1796.
    • A further paper submitted to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1802 made it clear that this school teacher of mathematics had an outstanding research talent (although it later transpired that Legendre had discovered the results six years earlier).
    • He was also approached to write further articles for Encyclopaedia Britannica and for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia while, in addition, he set about writing textbooks for his students at the Military College.
    • Then, in 1819, he was appointed professor of mathematics at Edinburgh University.
    • Leslie had been the professor of mathematics at Edinburgh since 1805, but he resigned the chair when appointed to the more prestigious post of professor of natural philosophy.
    • The Edinburgh chair was considered to be the leading mathematics chair for a Scot to hold, and certainly the Englishman Babbage was not seriously considered although he was supported by Ivory.
    • He soon made an impact on the teaching at Edinburgh, deciding to change from using Leslie's book to teach instead from Playfair's edition of Euclid's Elements.
    • In this Encyclopaedia Britannica article Wallace uses Newton's notation, but in his article Fluxions for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia which was published in 1815 he used Leibniz's differential notation and was therefore the first to write an English treatise on the calculus using differential notation.
    • Wallace retired from his chair at Edinburgh in 1838 due to ill health.
    • Indeed his health had broken down in 1835 and for his last three years in the chair at Edinburgh he did not even teach.

  30. Hardie Robert biography
    • Born: 31 August 1864 in George Street, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 9 March 1942 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Robert was educated at Circus Place School, Edinburgh.
    • Hardie then returned to Edinburgh where he was appointed as an Assistant in Logic and Metaphysics at the University in 1889.
    • Remaining at Edinburgh University he was again promoted, this time to Reader in Ancient Philosophy in 1920.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 and Hardie joined the Society at its inaugural meeting in February of that year.
    • At this time he gave his address as 4 Scotland Street, Edinburgh.
    • He appears to have left the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1930 but joined again two years later after he retired.
    • On Friday 9 March 1923 a discussion on the teaching of elementary geometry was opened by Mr A J Tressland, M.A., F.R.S.E., of the Edinburgh Academy, who advocated the adoption of the sequence in geometrical teaching contained in the schedule recently issued by a special committee of the Assistant-Masters' Association.

  31. Gregory Duncan biography
    • Born: 13 April 1813 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 23 February 1844 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Duncan Gregory's great great grandfather was James Gregory and he was the youngest son of another James Gregory (1753-1821) who was professor of medicine at Edinburgh University.
    • In October 1824 he entered Edinburgh Academy (where Maxwell and D'Arcy Thompson were to be educated).
    • On his return from Geneva, Gregory became an undergraduate at Edinburgh University where he began to study advanced mathematical topics and he also conducted experiments with polarised light.
    • He was most influenced by William Wallace who held the chair of mathematics at Edinburgh University.
    • However his interests were not only in mathematics for at Cambridge he continued to pursue his interest in chemistry which he had shown while an undergraduate at Edinburgh University.
    • He returned to Edinburgh, where he was an unsuccessful applicant for a chair, but he died there shortly afterwards in his father's house, Canaan Lodge, at the age of 30.
    • His work in this area is described in the paper On the real nature of symbolic algebra which Gregory published in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  32. Knott biography
    • Died: 26 October 1922 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Cargill Knott was educated at the High School in Arbroath, Angus, then studied at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He was appointed as an Assistant in Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University in 1879 and held this post until 1883.
    • He held this position from 1883 to 1891 when he returned to Edinburgh to become a Lecturer in Physics.
    • He then became a Reader in Applied Mathematics at Edinburgh University, holding this post until his death.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 March 1880 having been proposed by Peter Guthrie Tait, Alexander Crum Brown, John Gray M'Kendrick, Alexander Buchan.
    • He served on the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh from 1894 to 1897, from 1898 to 1901, and for a third time from 1902 to 1905.
    • Knott was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • In conjunction with two mathematical masters at George Watson's College in Edinburgh, Alexander Yule Fraser and Andrew Jeffrey Gunion Barclay, Knott who was then Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, issued the circular setting up the Society.
    • An obituary by Archibald Milne, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Mary's brother, James Main Dixon (1856-1933) was also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  33. Gwilt biography
    • Born: 25 July 1901 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 21 August 1972 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Richard Gwilt attended George Watson's College, Edinburgh where he was an excellent pupil.
    • In 1917, at the age of sixteen, he was appointed to the Edinburgh Life Assurance Company.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in June 1925.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 March 1941, his proposers being Sir Ernest M Wedderburn,Sir Edmund T Whittaker, A Graham Donald, James P Kendall.
    • An obituary, written by J M Ross, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1973, pages 34-35.
    • At 18 Walker Street, Edinburgh, on Thursday 3 November, to Marjory (nee Mair), wife of Richard Lloyd Gwilt, a son.

  34. Wilson John 2 biography
    • Died: 8 December 1896 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • John Wilson was an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh and graduated with an M.A.
    • He then entered the New College where he was trained for the ministry, becoming a licensed preacher in the Free Presbytery of Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh 22 (1897-99), i-ii.','1]:- .
    • He then moved to Edinburgh and became a Tutor in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy:- .
    • Wilson joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1885, two years after the Society was founded.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh elected Wilson to a fellowship of the Society on 4 February 1878.
    • Edinburgh 22 (1897-99), i-ii.
    • John Wilson, M.A., F.R.S.E., 25 Buccleugh Place, Edinburgh, who was at one time Rector of Bannockburn Academy, having succeeded his father in that office.
    • For the last ten years he resided in Edinburgh, following the vocation of a Mathematical tutor.
    • He was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, of which for a number of years he acted as treasurer, and of which he was elected president only a few weeks ago.
    • He was a frequent attender at the meetings of theRoyal Society of Edinburgh, and some years ago he made some original contributions on "Linkages" to the Society.

  35. Clark John biography
    • Died: 19 July 1947 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • John Clark was born in West Linton, a town about 22 km south of the centre of Edinburgh, on the road to Biggar.
    • He attended West Linton Public School, Peeblesshire, and then in 1877 went to Abbeyhill Heriot School, Edinburgh as a pupil-teacher.
    • After four years at Abbeyhill, Clark attended the Established Church Training College, Edinburgh.
    • He spent two years at the College during which time he also attended classes at Edinburgh University.
    • From 1883 to 1835 he was an Assistant Master at St Leonard's School, Edinburgh.
    • from the University of Edinburgh in July 1889 with Honours.
    • In 1889 he was appointed Mathematics and Physics Master at George Heriot's School, Edinburgh.
    • For example he was a member of the Edinburgh University Physical Society and served a term as President.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1885.
    • Clark was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 February 1891, his proposers being Sir John Murray, David Fowler Lowe, Peter Guthrie Tait, George Chrystal.
    • He served the Royal Society of Edinburgh as Councillor from 1928 to 1931, and Vice-President from 1931 to 1934.

  36. Cunningham Leslie biography
    • Born: 1895 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He entered The Edinburgh Academy in 1903, at the age of eight, and after spending three years there, according to [',' J M Whittaker, Leslie Bennet Craigie Cunningham, 0.B.E., M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, 18-19.','1] he entered Sedbergh School, Yorkshire, in 1906.
    • However, the matriculation records which he completed at the University of Edinburgh (in 1913) show that he spent three years at St Mary's, Melrose, after leaving The Edinburgh Academy, before attending Sedbergh School.
    • He began his studies at Edinburgh University in 1913 and in session 1913-14 he studied Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Chemistry.
    • Only in 1920 did Cunningham return to Edinburgh University to resume his studies after a six year gap.
    • from the University of Edinburgh for a thesis on the trajectory of a falling bomb entitled The motion of an Aircraft Bomb in the Attenuated Atmosphere.
    • Leslie Cunningham was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in March 1925 when he was living in Buckingham Terrace, Edinburgh.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1945, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Edward T Copson, David Gibb, Alexander C Aitken.
    • An obituary, written by J M Whittaker, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, pages 18-19.

  37. Gentle biography
    • Died: 31 March 1964 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • His family moved to Edinburgh in 1889 (moving to 2 Blackwood Crescent) and he completed his schooling at George Heriot's Hospital School.
    • He took the Edinburgh University Leaving Certificate examinations in 1896, passing Mathematics, English, and Dynamics at the Higher level, and Latin at Lower level.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, he first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1896.
    • After matriculating at Edinburgh University, Gentle had an outstanding undergraduate career winning bursaries and prizes.
    • Following graduation, Gentle was appointed as a Mathematics and Physics Master at George Heriot's School in Edinburgh.
    • A special meeting of the Heriot Trust Governors was hold in Edinburgh yesterday for the special purpose of appointing a headmaster for George Heriot's School in succession to Mr J B Clark, M.A., F.R.S.E.
    • In 1896 he entered Edinburgh University, and there, in addition to completing a full course for the B.Sc.
    • He has been a monitor of committee of various educational societies, such as the Edinburgh Branch of the Educational Institute of Scotland, the Secondary Teachers' Association, and the Science Teachers' Association.
    • He was in 1903 elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and in addition a member of the British Association, a member of the Mathematical Society, and an Associate of the Society of Musicians.
    • William Gentle was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1903.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 21 December 1908, his proposers being James Gordon MacGregor, David Fowler Lowe, Thomas Burns, John Brown Clark.
    • An obituary, written by W McL Dewar, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1965, pages 17-18.

  38. Jack Henry biography
    • He writes in [',' H Jack, John G B Meiklejohn, The Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952), 23-24.','1] about Meiklejohn's teaching and, in particular, his experiences in his class:- .
    • Meiklejohn encouraged Jack to study mathematics at University and he also encouraged him to enter the Bursary Competition for Edinburgh University.
    • Jack was awarded a Dalhousie Bursary and matriculated at Edinburgh University in the autumn of 1936.
    • At Edinburgh he was taught by, among others, Edmund Whittaker and Leonard Edge.
    • However, Edinburgh had a very classical syllabus at this time and although he took courses on analysis and geometry, he gained little experience in algebra.
    • There was no group theory taught in Edinburgh between 1936-40.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • These all appeared in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • His next few papers were either published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society or in the Proceeding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Perhaps the most interesting of these is one, which has appeared in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • His work was seen to be important and the Royal Society of Edinburgh awarded him their Keith Prize in 1970 and, in the same year, elected him to a fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  39. Watt biography
    • Born: 21 March 1863 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 3 December 1945 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • James Watt was educated at the Royal High School, Edinburgh.
    • W C E Jamieson of the Tron Church, Edinburgh.
    • In session 47 of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, namely session 1928-29, he joined the Society.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 20 February 1911, his proposers being James Campbell Dewar, Charles Scott Dickson (Lord Dickson), Sir James Dewar, A Crum Brown.
    • An obituary, written by E M Wedderburn, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, pages 36-37.

  40. Leslie biography
    • In 1785 Leslie went to the University of Edinburgh, matriculating as a divinity student.
    • In the same year Playfair was appointed Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh and Leslie became far more interested in attending classes in mathematics and science than he was in divinity lectures.
    • He took on other pupils too and in 1788 he sent his first paper to the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Soon after this Leslie became tutor to Thomas Randolph who was a student at Edinburgh but was from Virginia in North America.
    • Leslie, with strong recommendations from his lecturers at Edinburgh, obtained a position to tutor both Thomas and his brother William and he sailed to Virginia in 1888 to take up this position.
    • After two further unsuccessful attempts at chairs of natural philosophy (one in St Andrews and one in Edinburgh) he was appointed as professor of mathematics at Edinburgh in 1805 after a bitter dispute, since he was not ordained by the Church.
    • Before his election the Edinburgh moderates had insinuated that Leslie was an atheist.
    • When they brought forward their own candidate, Thomas MacKnight, an Edinburgh clergyman, Dugald Stewart and Playfair protested against the uniting of clerical and academic posts and objected to the intended clerical domination of the University of Edinburgh on the pattern of St Andrews.
    • After Leslie's election the Edinburgh moderates, determined to oust Leslie, took the affair to the general assembly of the Church of Scotland, its highest forum, which decided in May 1805 by the narrow majority of 96 to 84 that the affair be dropped and Leslie be left undeposed from his mathematics chair.
    • He wanted to rectify this by teaching mathematics courses specially tailored for his physics students, but the University of Edinburgh senate prevented him from giving such courses since these topics were deemed the responsibility of the professor of mathematics.
    • Leslie was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1807, a Corresponding Member of the French Academy of Sciences in 1820, and was knighted in 1832.
    • ., contributed to a popular work on polar travel, and wrote for the Scottish-based "Edinburgh Encyclopaedia" and for the "Encyclopaedia Britannica".
    • Lampooned in a student magazine as Edinburgh's Falstaff, he was short and fat with a florid face, his front teeth projected, and he tottered when walking.
    • Leslie, who owned a townhouse in Edinburgh with fine library and beautiful paintings, purchased in addition an estate at Coates which is east of Largo, set back from the Fife coast but with a fine view over the Firth of Forth.

  41. Brown Thomas biography
    • Born: 21 May 1893 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Thomas Arnold Brown's father was John Brown, and the family lived at 39 Spottiswoode Road, Edinburgh.
    • Thomas's secondary school education was at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, between October 1898 and July 1911.
    • He was dux of George Watson's in 1911, entering the University of Edinburgh in that year to study mathematics and physics, having passed Preliminary Examination in October 1911.
    • When Brown graduated from the University of Edinburgh, World War I was taking place and he had to undertake war service.
    • At first he began research at Edinburgh under Whittaker as well as undergoing military training.
    • Let us note that on a return trip to Edinburgh he was caught speeding in his car.
    • The engagement is announced between Thomas Arnold Brown, elder son of Mr and Mrs John Brown, 141 Craiglea Drive, Edinburgh, and Mary Cecil (Mollie), elder daughter of the late E A Gibson, B.A., LL.B., M.B., Ch.B., City Coroner for Manchester and Mrs Gibson, Blomfield Court, London W.
    • In December 1915 Thomas Brown joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Brown was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 March 1924, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, A Crichton Mitchell, Sir Ernest Maclagan Wedderburn, Ralph A Sampson.
    • An obituary, written by D Rees, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1966, pages 11-12.

  42. Waterston biography
    • Born: 1811 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Died: 18 June 1883 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • William and Catherine's son George Waterston, an Edinburgh sealing wax manufacturer and stationer, married Jane Blair from Dunkeld.
    • John Waterston studied at Edinburgh High School, then entered Edinburgh University to study mathematics and physics while at the same time being an apprentice in the engineering firm of Grainger and Miller.
    • At Edinburgh University he was a pupil of John Leslie who gave him an excellent training in mathematical physics.
    • He went for a walk along the waterfront close to Edinburgh and was never seen again.

  43. Whittaker biography
    • Died: 24 March 1956 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • George Chrystal, the professor at Edinburgh, died in November 1911 and in the following year Whittaker took up the chair in Edinburgh where he remained for the rest of his career.
    • Soon after he arrived in Edinburgh, Whittaker set up the Edinburgh Mathematical Laboratory to give a practical side to his interest in numerical analysis.
    • Another application which interested him came through his association with actuaries in Edinburgh who were dealing with life assurance.
    • 32 (1957), 234-256.','9] McCrea describes Whittaker's research lectures which he gave twice a week throughout the whole academic year while he was professor in Edinburgh:- .
    • He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, awarded the Society's Gunning Prize in 1929, and served the Society as President for most of the years of World War II.
    • 8.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1937 .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  44. Macintyre biography
    • Born: 3 April 1910 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He was rector of Trinity Academy Edinburgh from 1925 to 1942.
    • Sheila was brought up in Edinburgh where she attended Trinity Academy Edinburgh and during the time that she was studying there her father was appointed rector of the Academy.
    • She then attended Edinburgh Ladies' College, now renamed Mary Erskine School, from 1926 until 1928 when she graduated as Dux in Mathematics and joint Dux of the College.
    • In the same year, 1928, she entered the University of Edinburgh where she won several scholarships.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society 12 (1960-61), 112.','2]:- .
    • A few years later, in 1952, the two Macintyres published a more conventional type of joint paper, namely the 2-author work Theorems on the convergence and asymptotic validity of Abel's series (mentioned by Cossar in the quote above) which was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Sheila Macintyre was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and of the Mathematical Association.
    • On 3 March 1958 she was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh having been proposed for a fellowship by Edward Maitland Wright, Harold S A Potter, Charles Strachan, Reginald V Jones.
    • Edward Maitland Wright, writing in [',' E M Wright, Sheila Scott Macintyre, Year Book of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1961), 21-23.','4], says:- .

  45. Aitken biography
    • Died: 3 November 1967 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • at Edinburgh under Whittaker.
    • Aitken's wife, Mary, had continued to lecture at Otago up to the time they left for Edinburgh.
    • Even before the award of the degree, Aitken was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1925.
    • He was appointed to Edinburgh University in 1925 where he spent the rest of his life.
    • Colin M Campbell, now a colleague of the authors of this archive at the University of St Andrews, was a student in Edinburgh in the early 1960's.
    • Edinburgh's tribute to A C Aitken .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of A C Aitken .
    • 7.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1967 .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  46. Ferguson biography
    • Died: 31 December 1912 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Robert Ferguson's family moved from Airdrie to Edinburgh when Robert was three years old.
    • During this period, beginning in 1843, he studied at the University of Edinburgh and at New College.
    • with First Class Honours in Mathematics, Natural Philosophy and Philosophy by the University of Edinburgh, he studied under Bunsen in Heidelberg and was awarded a Ph.D.
    • In 1858, in partnership with a Mr Bickerton, he took over running the Edinburgh Institution at 8 Queen Street, Edinburgh.
    • Ferguson married Janet Margaret Monteith on 13 August 1864 in Edinburgh and they had two children: Duncan (born 1872) and James (born 1876).
    • After Janet's death he married Mary Leslie (or Marjoribanks) in Edinburgh in 1896.
    • Let us note that Ferguson was a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society at its first meeting in February 1883.
    • Robert Ferguson was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 January 1868, his proposers included Philip Kelland.
    • Obituary: Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  47. Carlyle biography
    • Carlyle entered the Edinburgh University in November 1809 where his parents expected him to train to enter the ministry.
    • Arriving at Edinburgh University he matriculated and began the four year course leading to an M.A.
    • He enrolled in Divinity Hall of the Church of Scotland in Edinburgh for his divinity training, but as his parents could not afford to have him study full time for three years, he chose the option of one year of full time study followed by six years part-time study during which he had to return to Edinburgh and preach a trial sermon once a year for each of the six years.
    • He left Edinburgh in June 1814 and returned to Annandale.
    • At least this had the advantage he could get easily to Edinburgh by taking a ferry ride across the Forth.
    • He continued his part-time divinity training and returned to Edinburgh to give a trial sermon on the text "Before I was afflicted I went astray".
    • In 1817 he tried to understand the Continental approach to the calculus by reading Wallace's article Fluxions which was published in the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia in 1815 and used Leibniz's differential notation.
    • Unhappy with teaching, Carlyle resigned from his post in Kirkcaldy in 1818, and returned to Edinburgh University.
    • He spent three unhappy years in Edinburgh, eventually deciding that he would change direction again.
    • Carlyle held a number of posts as a tutor after leaving Edinburgh University, having no fixed base.
    • Then, after Jane's mother rented a home on the outskirts of Edinburgh for the couple to live in once they were married, the marriage took place on 17 October 1826.
    • Carlyle also applied unsuccessfully for the chair of moral philosophy at St Andrews University, and he even applied for the chair of astronomy at Edinburgh University in 1834.
    • He did however publish Characteristics in the Edinburgh Review in 1831.
    • Carlyle became rector of Edinburgh University in 1865 after Gladstone retired from the office.

  48. Ince biography
    • Died: 16 March 1941 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • In 1909 Ince matriculated at Edinburgh University where he read mathematics.
    • Ince graduated in 1913 with First Class Honours in mathematics and was awarded a scholarship to remain at Edinburgh University to undertake research.
    • After teaching at Edinburgh University during the academic year 1931-32, he then was appointed to Imperial College, London, where he taught until 1935 when he was appointed as head of the department of Technical Mathematics at Edinburgh.
    • After Ince returned to the chair in Edinburgh he became involved with the short student texts which were being published by Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh.
    • The two papers The periodic Lame functions and Further investigations into the periodic Lame functions both appeared in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1940.
    • One further paper, Simultaneous linear partial differential equations of the second order, was edited by Erdelyi after Ince's death and published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1942.
    • Ince was honoured with election to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1923.

  49. Russell A D biography
    • Born: 22 July 1872 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Alexander Russell lived at 19 Graham Street, Edinburgh.
    • He attended George Heriot's School in Edinburgh and passed the Preliminary Examinations of the Scottish Educational Department in English, Mathematics, Latin, Dynamics, French, and German in June 1889 and June 1890.
    • He first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1890.
    • from the University of Edinburgh in 1896.
    • After a year as a Demonstrator in Physics at the University, he was appointed to Morelands School, Edinburgh, where he taught for one year.
    • Russell was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 12 December 1905 having been proposed by William Peddie, John Brown Clark, Robert Traill Omond, and Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • At the meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1897 he became a member of the Society.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.
    • In this obituary Russell is described as being [',' Alexander Durie Russell obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 40 (1956), 32.','1]:- .

  50. Schlapp biography
    • Born: 18 July 1899 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Otto, originally from Germany, had taught German at George Watson's Boys' College but became the first Professor of German at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Robin (as Robert was known to all his colleagues including the authors of this biography) was educated at George Watson's School, Edinburgh, and completed his school education as dux of the School in 1917.
    • Although he had been placed first in the Edinburgh University Bursary Competition, and awarded a George Watson's Bursary and the Glass Mathematical Bursary, Robin enlisted for military service.
    • Returning to Edinburgh University after the war ended, Schlapp graduated with an M.A.
    • Schlapp was then appointed as an Assistant in Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University.
    • Subsequently he was a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics, then Senior Lecturer in Mathematical Physics at Edinburgh University.
    • In January 1923 Schlapp joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 14 March 1927, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Sir Charles G Darwin, David Gibb, Edward Thomas Copson.
    • An obituary, written by Nicholas Kemmer, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1993, pages 111-114.

  51. Blades biography
    • Died: 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He then matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in 1894 where he studies a variety of topics.
    • His teachers at the University of Edinburgh were, amongst others, Chrystal, Tait and Crum-Brown:- .
    • After the requisite period of teaching in an elementary school, for several years Blades was junior lecturer in mathematics and assistant in science and geography in Moray House Training College, Edinburgh.
    • He was also, for some time, lecturer in honours geology in Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh.
    • Later he was head of the mathematics department in George Watson's Ladies' College, Edinburgh.
    • in 1946 by the University of Edinburgh for his work during the war.
    • secretary of Edinburgh University Extra-Mural Committee.
    • On Saturday 4 June 1949 Edinburgh University Extra-Mural Committee held a one-day school in the Junior Secondary School, Currie.
    • Edward Blades joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1905 when he was teaching at George Watson's Ladies' College, Edinburgh.

  52. Gibb biography
    • Died: 28 March 1946 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1900 giving his Edinburgh address as c/o H Flockhart, 3 West Preston Street.
    • with First Class Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy from the University of Edinburgh in July 1906, followed by a B.Sc.
    • Following his graduation, Gibb was a mathematics teacher in a school until Chrystal appointed him a Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh in 1909.
    • He was promoted to Reader in Mathematics at Edinburgh in 1934 and held this post until his death.
    • On the staff he had as colleagues a succession of brilliant men who, while they did much for the reputation of the Edinburgh Mathematical Department, and now occupy chairs in other universities, were in many cases not well acquainted with Scottish educational matters: and the duty of acting as director of studies and generally as liaison officer between the University and the Scottish schools fell chiefly on Mr Gibb, who discharged it admirably.
    • Gibb was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 24 January 1910 having been proposed by George Chrystal, Sir Frank Watson Dyson, Cargill Gilston Knott, and Ellice M Horsburgh.
    • Gibb joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1910.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.

  53. Etherington biography
    • His tutor was Bill Ferrar who had been appointed to Oxford in 1925 after spending two years as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh working under Edmund Whittaker.
    • However, his tutor Bill Ferrar saw that Etherington had mathematical talents far beyond what his Second Class degree indicated, and contacted Edmund Whittaker in Edinburgh recommending Etherington for research towards a Ph.D.
    • He was accepted and, after undertaking research in Edinburgh, was awarded a Ph.D.
    • by the University of Edinburgh in 1932 for his thesis On Relativistic Cosmology, and the Definition of Distance in General Relativity.
    • After only one year, he was appointed to a lectureship at the University of Edinburgh and taught there for 41 years until he retired at the age of 66 in 1974.
    • To emphasise his achievements we note that, at the age of 26, he was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1934.
    • Ivor and Betty Etherington [',' T A Gillespie, Ivor Malcolm Haddon Etherington BA(Oxon), PhD, DSc(Edin), Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook 1995 (1995), 101-.','8]:- .
    • Ffoulkes Edwards was studying medicine at University College Hospital, London and after he took up his lectureship in Edinburgh, Etherington began a long correspondence with him on blood group inheritance.
    • To see the motivation for Etherington's research in this area we quote from the introduction to his paper Non-associative algebra and the symbolism of genetics published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1941:- .
    • Edinburgh.
    • Our colleague, Colin Campbell, was a student at the University of Edinburgh in the early 1960s and was taught by Etherington.
    • As a student at Edinburgh University in the early 1960s I very much remember Dr Etherington (or Dr I H M Etherington but certainly not Ivor Etherington).
    • He served the Edinburgh Mathematical Society during his career, as secretary for ten years between 1933 and 1944, as editor of the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes and as President of the Society in 1947-48.
    • He was awarded the Keith Prize by the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1958.
    • Let us end this biography by giving a quote from [',' T A Gillespie, Ivor Malcolm Haddon Etherington BA(Oxon), PhD, DSc(Edin), Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook 1995 (1995), 101-.','8] concerning Etherington's interests outside mathematics:- .

  54. Mackenzie biography
    • Born: 2 May 1903 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Gladys Mackenzie's father was Lachlan Paterson Mackenzie, an ironfounder, of Polwarth Terrace, Edinburgh.
    • Gladys attended Craigmount School, Edinburgh, from 1913 to 1919 and, in passing, we note a news item which tell us that in 1914 she took part in "a fancy dress frolic for children under twelve dressed as a Normandy Peasant." She sat the Scottish Leaving Certificate Examinations and obtained passes at Higher level in English, French, Latin, and Mathematics, having obtained a pass in Lower mathematics in the previous year.
    • In 1919 Mackenzie matriculated in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Edinburgh giving Church of Scotland as her Religious Denomination.
    • Mackenzie was appointed as an Assistant in the Department of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh.
    • After working in Edinburgh for two years, Mackenzie was appointed to a Lectureship in Physics at Newnham College, Cambridge in 1926.
    • In August 1926: Miss Gladys I Mackenzie, daughter of Mr I P Mackenzie of Polwarth Terrace, Edinburgh, and at present an Assistant in the Department of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh, has been appointed to the Lectureship in Physics at Newnham College, Cambridge.
    • of Edinburgh University, and she was a demonstrator in the Physics Laboratory of Edinburgh University at the time of her appointment.
    • Gladys Mackenzie joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1925.

  55. Young Andrew biography
    • Died: 20 July 1968 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Andrew was educated at Townshead Public School, Montrose, where he spent trhree months, Broughton Public School, Edinburgh, where he spent two and a half years, then at George Watson's College, Edinburgh where he spent seven years.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, he first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1909.
    • He returned to the University of Edinburgh, now 35 years of age, and studied law.
    • In December 1913 Young joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • However, he remained a member through the various stages in his career, while he worked in Bremen, Germany, and after he returned to Edinburgh.
    • Young was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 March 1937, his proposers being Charles H O'Donoghue, Alexander Craig Aitken, Sir Ernest M Wedderburn,Sir Edmund T Whittaker.
    • An obituary, written anonymously, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1970, pages 53-54.

  56. Allardice biography
    • Born: 2 March 1862 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He studied mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, where he first matriculated in 1879, and was awarded an M.A.
    • In 1883 Allardice was appointed as Assistant to the Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, the professor being George Chrystal.
    • Allardice was a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in February 1883.
    • He was Vice-President of the Society from 1889 to 1890, President of the Society in session 1890-91, and Editor of Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in session 1891-92, his final year in Edinburgh.
    • He published around twenty papers in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society during the first ten years of the Society.
    • Robert Edgar Allardice was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 16 January 1888, his proposers being George Chrystal, Peter Guthrie Tait, Robert M Ferguson, John Sturgeon Mackay.
    • An obituary, written by E M Horsburgh, appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Volume 48, 1927-28, 209-10.

  57. Lidstone biography
    • Died: 12 May 1952 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • In 1913 Lidstone was appointed as Manager and Actuary of the Scottish Widows' Fund in Edinburgh.
    • by the University of Edinburgh and the university detailed the contribution which had led them to award Lidstone the degree:- .
    • Mr Lidstone has keen invited here today as a leading representative of the great insurance corporations which have their home in Edinburgh, and the official head of the profession under whose skilful guidance this vast business is conducted.
    • Mr William Penman, a Past-President of the Institute, presented the Address in person to Mr Lidstone at his home in Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh .
    • Lidstone was elected a fellow of the Faculty of Actuaries on arriving in Edinburgh and he served on its council and as its president from 1924 to 1926.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in January 1918.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1918, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, George Macritchie Low, John Horne, Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • An obituary, written by R Ll Gwilt, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1953, pages 28-30.

  58. Barkla biography
    • Died: 23 October 1944 in Braidwood, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Four years later, in 1913, he was appointed to the Chair of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University.
    • NEW EDINBURGH PROFESSOR .
    • Yesterday afternoon the Curators of Patronage of Edinburgh University appointed Professor Charles Glover Barkla, at present Wheatstone Professor of Physics, University of London, King's College, to the vacant Chair of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, caused by the demise of Professor J G MacGregor.
    • Barkla took a prominent part in instituting honours degrees in pure science at Edinburgh and in developing the honours school of physics, modelling his leadership style on that of Thomson at the Cavendish.
    • On 19 January 1914 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Details of Barkla's scientific work appears in his obituary, written by C T R Wilson, which appeared an the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, 17-18.
    • Barkla was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He joined the Society in December 1913 soon after he arrived in Edinburgh to take up his appointment as Professor of Natural Philosophy.

  59. Tweedie biography
    • Died: 14 September 1925 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Charles also had an older sister Annie Jane (born 1866) and an older brother David (born 1865) who, like Charles, also went on to become a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Charles was a pupil at George Watson's College, Edinburgh and while there he was awarded a Sibbald Bursary to study at the University of Edinburgh.
    • by the University of Edinburgh in the same year and gained the Bruce of Grangehill Bursary awarded to the best mathematician in the final year.
    • He also studied at the University of Berlin in the following year before returning to Edinburgh where he was appointed as an Assistant at the University.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 December 1897 having been proposed by George Chrystal, Peter Guthrie Tait, Cargill Gilston Knott, John Sturgeon Mackay.
    • He was also a strong supporter of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society serving the Society as Treasurer from 1895 to 1898 and President in 1903-04.
    • More information about Tweedie is given in an obituary in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society at THIS LINK.

  60. Macdonald William biography
    • Died: 29 December 1941 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He only taught there for a short time before accepting an appointment as Mathematics Master at Merchiston Castle School in Edinburgh.
    • In 1880 he moved schools, but remained in Edinburgh, when he went to Daniel Stewart's College.
    • lately Mathematical master in Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh.
    • He is author of "A Higher Geometry." He was President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society 1888 - 9, and President of the Scottish Secondary School Teachers' Association 1898 - 9.
    • He did accept a fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, becoming a fellow on 1 February 1886.
    • Macdonald was a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining at the first meeting of the Society in February 1883.
    • He also acted as editor of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1896-97.
    • Edinburgh, on 29th December 1941.

  61. Thompson DArcy biography
    • Born: 2 May 1860 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • D'Arcy Thompson's father, also called D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, was a classics master at the Edinburgh Academy when his son was born.
    • D'Arcy lived part of the time with his grandfather Joseph Gamgee and from the age of ten he attended Edinburgh Academy.
    • in his class at Edinburgh Academy was one boy who won the Victoria Cross, one with a seat in the Cabinet, one Royal Academician, and four Fellows of the Royal Society.
    • After starting a medicine course at Edinburgh University in 1877 he studied this for three years before he changed to study zoology at Trinity College, Cambridge.
    • He also received recognition for his mathematics, being made an honorary member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1933.
    • He was President of the Classical Association in 1929 and President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1934-39.
    • 4.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1933 .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  62. Guthrie biography
    • Died: 15 September 1978 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • William Guthrie's father was the Rev W A Guthrie, D.D., who was the Minister at Fountainbridge Church, Edinburgh, but at the time William was born he was headmaster of Foulford school in Cowdenbeath, Fife.
    • William attended Broughton Secondary School, Edinburgh, completing his school education in 1922 when he was dux of the school.
    • He won the Bruce Bursary to study at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Guthrie was a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, a member of the Irish Astronomical Society, and of the Edinburgh Astronomical Society.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1926.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1933, his proposers being Herbert Stanley Allen, Herbert Westren Turnbull, David Jack, Edward Thomas Copson.
    • An obituary, written by H A Bruck, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1979, pages 35-36.
    • W A Guthrie, D.D., and Mrs Guthrie, 13 Crawfurd Road, Edinburgh, and Thelma, only daughter of Mr and Mrs Gibson Pate, Schoolhouse, St Boswells, Roxburghshire.

  63. Hamilton William biography
    • Died: 6 May 1856 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He continued to study logic and moral philosophy at Glasgow before entering the University of Edinburgh in 1806 to study medicine.
    • Veitch reports that in 1810 his [',' J Veitch, Sir William Hamilton (Edinburgh, 1869).','6]:- .
    • in 1811 but he did not receive a fellowship, and returned to Edinburgh.
    • Back in Edinburgh Hamilton joined the legal profession becoming an advocate.
    • In 1821 Hamilton was appointed professor of civil history at Edinburgh University but from 1829 he began to become known as a philosopher when he published an article in the Edinburgh Review which discussed Kant's ideas.
    • Further philosophical articles in the Edinburgh Review on topics such as the philosophy of the conditioned, perception, and logic enhanced his reputation.
    • In 1836 Hamilton became professor of logic and metaphysics at the University of Edinburgh, giving his inaugural lecture on 21 November.
    • After moving to Edinburgh, Hamilton's mother came from Glasgow to live with him in 1815.

  64. Comrie biography
    • Died: 20 December 1944 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • After three years in Aberdeen he became Head of Mathematics in Boroughmuir School, Edinburgh, in 1904.
    • In 1917 he was appointed Headmaster of Castle Hill School, Edinburgh, and at this time he lived at 19 Craighouse Terrace, Edinburgh.
    • Comrie was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 15 March 1909 having been proposed by Sir James Donaldson, P R Scott Lang, James Gordon MacGregor, and George A Gibson.
    • Comrie was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in March 1905.
    • This meant that he played a major role in organising the 1913 Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium:- .
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.
    • John Mackie writes in [',' J Mackie, Peter Comrie obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 36 (1947), 25.','1]:- .

  65. Erdelyi biography
    • Died: 12 December 1977 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • However within a few days of writing the letter Erdelyi was in Edinburgh.
    • For two years he held a research grant from Edinburgh then he became a lecturer there.
    • After returning to Edinburgh for session 1948/49 he resigned in 1949 to take up a chair in California.
    • In 1964 he returned to Edinburgh where a second chair of mathematics had been created to provide leadership since Aitken was in very poor health.
    • He remained in Edinburgh until his death, continuing to produce a steady stream of high quality papers up to the time of his death.
    • He had been elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1945, receiving their Gunning Victoria Jubilee Prize in 1977, and elected a member of the Academy of Sciences of Turin in 1953.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of A Erdelyi .

  66. Rutherford biography
    • Rutherford returned to Scotland in 1932 after completing his doctoral studies and was appointed to the University of Edinburgh as an Assistant Lecturer in Mathematics.
    • After one year in Edinburgh he joined the staff in St Andrews, again as an Assistant Lecturer in Mathematics, but in 1934 he was promoted to Lecturer in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics and given the task of building Applied Mathematics at St Andrews.
    • Looking at the journals in which he published, it is immediately clear how Scottish they are; the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the Glasgow Mathematical Society, and the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Rutherford's papers in the 1940s included On the relations between the numbers of standard tableaux, On the matrix representation of complex symbols, On substitutional equations, Some continuant determinants arising in physics and chemistry, On commuting matrices and commutative algebras; these being published either by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society or by the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Outstanding research contributions led to Rutherford being elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1934 and he received the Keith Prize from the Society for an outstanding series of papers he published in 1951-53.
    • While mentioning the Royal Society of Edinburgh we should note that he served on the Council from 1954 to 1957.
    • In fact he received a posthumous prize from the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, for they awarded him their Makdougall-Brisbane Prize for the papers he published over the period 1964-65.
    • In [',' Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1966-67 (1968), 41-43.','3] Copson writes about some of Rutherford's interests:- .
    • Some of his pictures were exhibited in Edinburgh and Dundee.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of D E Rutherford .

  67. Paton biography
    • Died: 26 August 1973 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • James Paton was born in Cowdenbeath, Fife, but spent his early years in Kelty [',' M A S Ross, James Paton M.A., B.Sc.(Edin.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1974, 15-18.','1]:- .
    • He completed his secondary education at Beath Secondary School, Cowdenbeath, Fife in 1921, and matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in the same year.
    • He accepted a post at the Meteorological Office in London in 1927 but returned to Edinburgh in the following year when appointed to a Lectureship in Natural Philosophy.
    • He remained on the staff at Edinburgh University throughout his career, being a Lecturer from 1928 to 1950, a Senior Lecturer from 1950 to 1954, a reader from 1954 to 1964, and finally Head of Department of Meteorology from 1964 until his death in 1973.
    • On 4 January 1950 the 'Aims of Science Teaching Conference' was held at King's Buildings Edinburgh with Paton as one of the delegates.
    • Paton joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1929.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1946, his proposers being Charles T R Wilson, William M H Greaves,Sir Edmund T Whittaker, George A Carse.
    • An obituary, written by M A S Ross, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1974, pages 15-18.

  68. McKendrick biography
    • Born: 8 September 1876 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Both brothers and their father were fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • In 1920 McKendrick came to Edinburgh as Superintendent of the Research Laboratory of the Royal College of Physicians.
    • In February 1926 he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • A G M'Kendrick (1876 - 1943) rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Indian Medical Service and then became Superintendent of the Research Laboratory of the Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh.
    • A death notice which appeared in the Edinburgh Medical Journal gives a description of his life and work.
    • Anderson McKendrick was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 18 March 1912, his proposers being James Oliver, Diarmid Noel Paton, Ralph Stockman, Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • An obituary, written by W F Harvey, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1944, pages 23-24.
    • Educated at Kelvinside Academy, Glasgow, Colonel McKendrick will be best remembered as Director of the Pasteur Institute of India (Kasauli), a post he held from 1914 until 1920; as superintendent of the Research Laboratories of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh from 1920 to 1941; and for his mathematical work as medical statistician.

  69. Carr biography
    • Died: 14 July 2016 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Carr and Dyson published three joint papers in 1974-1975, one being in the proceedings of the conference Ordinary and partial differential equations held at the University of Dundee, Scotland, in 1974 and the other two in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • In 1974 Carr was appointed as a lecturer in mathematics at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland.
    • This article was in anticipation of the fourth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics which was held in Edinburgh 5-9 July 1999.
    • Robert Edmund O'Malley, an American mathematician who had spent a year at Heriot-Watt University in around 1970, attended the fourth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics and wrote in [',' R O’Malley, The People Were Great in Edinburgh! A Highly Personal Trip Account, SIAM News (23 September 1999).','8] about Carr's contribution to organising this conference:- .
    • Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt mathematicians Jack Carr, Lyn Thomas, Michael Levitin, and Adri Olde Daalhuis joined professional staff from Meeting Makers in Glasgow and lots of young assistants, including Sir Michael Atiyah's son, in making the combined registration/headquarters operation function very efficiently.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1986.
    • In 2002 he and his wife Teresa were given Inspiration Awards by the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • These annual awards recognise the outstanding contribution made by volunteers to the Royal Society of Edinburgh's programme of educational activities for young people.

  70. Ramsay biography
    • Died: 2 July 1926 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • In 1908 he was appointed Second Mathematics Master at George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • Appointment to George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • Mr Peter Ramsay, M.A., B.Sc., has been appointed Dr Pinkerton's successor as head of the Mathematics Department in George Watson' s College, Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh 46 (1925-26), 382.','1]:- .
    • Ramsay became a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1905.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 25 May 1914.
    • DEATH OF EDINBURGH TEACHER .
    • The death occurred suddenly yesterday morning of Mr Peter Ramsay, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.S.E., who was deputy headmaster and head Mathematical master, of George Watson's College, Edinburgh.

  71. Watson William biography
    • Died: 28 June 1952 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • William Watson attended his father's school from 1891 to 1898 and then proceeded to the Royal High School, Edinburgh.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, he first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1902.
    • At first Watson decided to study classics at Edinburgh University and it was only part way through his studies that he changed topics to mathematics and natural philosophy.
    • Watson was already employed as assistant in the Physical laboratory in Edinburgh.
    • Family circumstances led to him returning to Edinburgh and he completed further research there.
    • William Watson joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1913, in the year after he took up his post at Heriot-Watt College.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1923, his proposers being Francis Gibson Baily, Henry Briggs, Alfred Archibald Boon, Arthur Pillans Laurie.
    • An obituary, written by J Cameron Smail, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1953, pages 50-52.

  72. Lawson biography
    • Died: 15 March 1941 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • In 1900 Lawson went to Edinburgh to take up the post of Mathematics Master at George Watson's College.
    • After retiring he moved to Edinburgh, living at 49 Merchiston Crescent.
    • Lawson was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society joining the Society in February 1897 while he was Assistant to the Professor of Mathematics at the University of St Andrews.
    • In a meeting held on Friday 9 March 1923 a discussion on the teaching of elementary geometry was opened by Mr A J Tressland, M.A., F.R.S.E., of the Edinburgh Academy, who advocated the adoption of the sequence in geometrical teaching contained in the schedule recently issued by a special committee of the Assistant-Masters' Association.
    • At the Edinburgh Mathematical Society's 1938 St Andrews Colloquium, held during Lawson's presidency of the Society, he submitted for debate a paper on "Neglect of Form and Law in School Algebra" on the Saturday night.
    • On Friday 4 November 1938 Lawson gave his presidential address to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • An obituary, written by Peter Comrie, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and is at THIS LINK.
    • On Monday 1 August 1938 a letter by George Lawson, written during his time as President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, concerning Merchiston Castle was published in The Scotsman.

  73. Mackay biography
    • Born: 2 July 1927 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Mackay attended George Heriot's School in Edinburgh and then entered the University of Edinburgh where he studied mathematics and natural philosophy (as physics was known in the university at that time).
    • In 1947 he was awarded a scholarship to undertake further study in mathematics at the University of Cambridge and in the following year he graduated from Edinburgh with an MA with Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.
    • He then changed topic and, returning to Edinburgh to study law, he was awarded the degree of LLB (with distinction) in 1955.
    • On St Andrews day (30 November) 1991, Lord Mackay was installed as Chancellor of Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1984 and received their Royal Medal in 2003.
    • He has received honorary degrees from the universities of Edinburgh (1983), Dundee (1983), Strathclyde (1985), Aberdeen (1987), St Andrews (1989), Cambridge (1989), William and Mary (1989), Birmingham (1990), Newcastle (1990), Bath (1994), Glasgow (1994), Oxford (1998), and De Montford (1999).
    • The Queen attended the installation of Lord Mackay of Clashfern as Knight of the Order of the Thistle in a ceremony at St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh.

  74. Dunbar biography
    • He was awarded a bursary in 1907 to go to Edinburgh University.
    • The records at the University of Edinburgh show a gap between 1910 and 1914 when he took no courses.
    • The only additional facts we can add to those given above are that Dunbar was awarded the Robert Wilson Memorial Prize for Chemistry from Edinburgh University for session 1910 and that he was runner-up for the Mackay-Smith scholarship in Natural Philosophy in 1910.
    • At the end of the war Dunbar returned to Edinburgh University.
    • Margaret White was born in Edinburgh in 1892.
    • She then attended Edinburgh University where she graduated M.A.
    • She was an assistant in natural philosophy at Edinburgh University from 1916 to 1920 and she was appointed lecturer in 1920.
    • Dunbar left Edinburgh in 1924 to take up the position of Senior Lecturer in Physics at University College Cardiff.
    • The bearing of Compton's theory on the J-phenomena was investigated by R T Dunbar, an Edinburgh graduate who worked for several years in Barkla's laboratory and was afterwards appointed professor of physics in University College, Cardiff.
    • Robert Dunbar joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1914 while still an undergraduate in Edinburgh.
    • Margaret P White joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1917 while an Assistant in Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University.

  75. Mitchell James biography
    • Born: 1871 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • James Mitchell's father was James Mitchell (born in Edinburgh about 1839) who was a school board officer.
    • James Mitchell studied at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, where he had a highly successful career winning many prizes in a range of subjects.
    • He entered the University of Edinburgh where he held the Welsh Mathematics Bursary, the Horslie-Scott Bursary and the Drummond Mathematics Scholarship.
    • After travels in Europe and the United States he was appointed to the University of Edinburgh, but quickly decided to make a career in school teaching.
    • In March 1894, after obtaining his first degree, Mitchell joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 July 1900, his proposers being A Crum Brown, Cargill Gilston Knott, Peter Guthrie Tait, Alexander Buchan.
    • An obituary, written anonymously, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1959/1960, page 93.

  76. Drysdale biography
    • Died: 1946 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He spent four years at the school before entering Regent Road Public School, Edinburgh, in 1881.
    • He spent the first two years of his secondary education at this school, then proceeded to George Heriot's Hospital School, Edinburgh, where he spent the final five years of his secondary education.
    • He was in the same class as David Johnstone and the two became friends (they went together when they first matriculated at Edinburgh University and appear in the Matriculation Album as consecutative entries).
    • In Edinburgh Drysdale lived at 7 Cambusnethan Street.
    • After having passed Preliminary Examination for Edinburgh University, he first matriculated there in October 1895.
    • In 1899, the year in which he graduated M.A., Drysdale applied to join the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • By this time Drysdale was teaching at the school at which he himself had been a pupil during the bulk of his secondary education, namely George Heriot's School, Edinburgh.

  77. Horsburgh biography
    • Died: 28 December 1935 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He was educated at the Collegiate School, Charlotte Square, Edinburgh, then spent time in Australia before entering the University of Edinburgh.
    • He was appointed as a Lecturer in Electrical Engineering at Leith Technical College before being appointed a Lecturer in Technical Mathematics at Edinburgh University in 1903.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1904 having been proposed by George Chrystal, Charles Tweedie, Sir Thomas Hudson Beare, Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • Horsburgh was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • An abituary, written by E T Whittaker, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society at THIS LINK.

  78. Barclay biography
    • Barclay was a pupil at Hawick Parish School for nine years before matriculating as a student at the University of Edinburgh in 1871.
    • He specialised in mathematics and, after graduating, taught for a period in George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • During this period he was elected fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 January 1886.
    • He moved from Edinburgh to Glasgow in 1892 when he was appointed to the teaching staff of Glasgow High School.
    • In 1936 the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh sent him their felicitations on his continuous membership of the Society for fifty years.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in February 1883 and it was Barclay together with Alexander Yule Fraser, also a mathematics master at George Watson's College at the time, together with Cargill Gilston Knott, an Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, who issued a circular 'to gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge and throughout Scotland generally whom they deemed likely to take an interest in such a Society' calling for a Mathematical Society to be set up.
    • EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY, .
    • It is suggested that the Society be formed, in the first instance, of all those who shall give in their names on or before February 2, 1883, and who are (1) present or former students in either of the Advanced Mathematical Classes of Edinburgh University, (2) Honours Graduates in any of the British Universities, or (3) recognised Teachers of Mathematics; and that, after the above mentioned date, members be nominated and elected by ballot in the usual manner.
    • ANDREW JEFFREY GUNION BARCLAY, late of Watson's College, Edinburgh, and Glasgow High School, in his 95th year.
    • Mr Barclay, who specialised in mathematics, taught for a period in George Watson's College, Edinburgh, and afterwards, from 1892, in Glasgow High School, retiring from the post of head mathematical master shortly before the last war, when he went to reside with a son, a chartered accountant, in London.

  79. Mackay J S biography
    • Died: 26 March 1914 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • However, he decided that he would make teaching his career and in 1866 he was appointed as a Mathematics Master at the Edinburgh Academy; he held this post until he retired in 1904.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 February 1882 having been proposed by Peter Guthrie Tait, George Chrystal, H C Fleeming Jenkin, Alexander Dickson.
    • He served the Royal Society of Edinburgh as a Councillor from 1895 to 1898, and again from 1900 to 1903.
    • Mackay was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • His obituary, written by George A Gibson, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He lived at 69 Northumberland Street, Edinburgh, where he died at the age of 70.

  80. Pairman biography
    • Born: 8 June 1896 in Broomieknowe, Lasswade, near Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Eleanor Pairman was born in Lasswade, which is about six miles south-east of the centre of the city of Edinburgh.
    • Then in 1908 she entered George Watson's Ladies' College in Edinburgh.
    • She matriculated at the University of Edinburgh, beginning her studies in session 1914-15 after winning a John Welsh Mathematical Bursary.
    • In her first year at Edinburgh University she studied Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Logic.
    • Supported by the scholarship, Pairman spent the academic year 1917-18 undertaking graduate studies at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Leaving Edinburgh, Pairman went to London where she worked for a year for Karl Pearson in the Department of Applied Statistics at University College London as a computer (at this time computers were people and not machines!).
    • Pairman joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1917, and read the paper On a difference equation due to Stirling to the meeting of the Society on 11 January 1918, and the paper A new form of the remainder in Newton's interpolation formula to the next meeting of the Society on 8 February.

  81. Edge biography
    • After holding a fellowship at Trinity he was offered a lectureship at the University of Edinburgh by E T Whittaker which he accepted and took up the post in 1932.
    • Edge was to spend the rest of his career at Edinburgh and David Monk, writing in [',' D Monk, Professor W L Edge, The Scotsman (Edinburgh, 4 Oct 1997).','2], suggests that the reason that Edge never moved to a chair in another university was because:- .
    • the Scottish hills and mountains, which he loved, kept him in Edinburgh.
    • Edge played a major role in the success of the Mathematics Department at Edinburgh, first under Whittaker's and then under Aitken's leadership.
    • For many years Edge was someone I [EFR] expected to see whenever I went to the Edinburgh University Staff Club.
    • Edge taught the algebra courses at Edinburgh at this time but he taught algebra with a strong geometric flavour reflecting his deep knowledge, feel and love for geometry.
    • Edge had a deep concern for his students, both while they were studying at Edinburgh and after they had graduated.
    • Monk [',' D Monk, Professor W L Edge, The Scotsman (Edinburgh, 4 Oct 1997).','2] describes Edge's lifestyle and interests outside mathematics as follows:- .
    • They performed in particular on the first Friday of each month that the Edinburgh Mathematical Society met.
    • Honorary Edinburgh Mathematical Society Member: W L Edge .
    • 5.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1983 .

  82. Wedderburn biography
    • He then went to George Watson's College, an independent school in Edinburgh, for three years.
    • In 1898 he completed his school education and won a scholarship to study at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He entered Edinburgh University in 1898, at the age of sixteen and a half.
    • He began mathematical research while still an undergraduate and his first paper, On the isoclinal lines of a differential equation of the first order was published in the Proceedings of The Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1903.
    • Two other papers which he published in the same year in publications of the Royal Society of Edinburgh were on the scalar functions of a vector and on an application of quaternions to differential equations.
    • degree with First Class Honours in mathematics from the University of Edinburgh in 1903.
    • Returning to Scotland in 1905, Wedderburn worked for four years at the University of Edinburgh as an assistant to George Chrystal.
    • The depth of Wedderburn's contribution to algebra during these years in Edinburgh was remarkable.
    • From 1906 to 1908 he served as editor of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Among the honours which Wedderburn received were the MacDougall-Brisbane Gold Medal and Prize from the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1921, and election to the Royal Society of London in 1933.
    • 4.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1946 .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  83. Childs biography
    • Died: 4 July 1956 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Childs was appointed as an Assistant Lecturer in Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University in 1922.
    • Shortly after arriving in Edinburgh as an Assistant, Bernard Childs joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1923.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1956, his proposers being Norman Feather, Robert Schlapp, James Paton, Thomas R Bolam.
    • An obituary, written by Norman Feather, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1957, pages 10-12.
    • (Birm.), F.Inst.P., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1957, 10-12.','1]:- .
    • Over a longer period he was an office-bearer of the Edinburgh Association of University Teachers (Secretary, 1933 - 35 and 1951 - 53; Vice-President, 1953 - 56).

  84. Brown Alexander biography
    • Born: 5 May 1877 in Dalkeith, near Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Alexander Brown attended Newton Public School from 1884 to 1887, then George Watson's College, Edinburgh from 1889 to 1893.
    • He then entered the University of Edinburgh, studying Latin, Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at Ordinary level in 1893-94.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in December 1898.
    • Alexander Brown was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 20 May 1907, his proposers being George Chrystal, Arthur John Pressland, John Sturgeon Mackay, and John Alison.
    • An obituary, written by Lawrence Crawford, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1949, pages 10-11.

  85. Boyle Margaret biography
    • Died: 11 September 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • She and Agnes Mudie both lived at Buchanan Hostel, East Suffolk Road, Edinburgh, and both joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1926.
    • secretary of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society:- .
    • I left Edinburgh several years ago owing to a breakdown in health.
    • As I am not likely to take up mathematics again, or be in the vicinity of Edinburgh, I regret that I must let my membership lapse.
    • When her husband died in 1971 she moved to live with her son David and his wife in Edinburgh, where she died in September 1995.

  86. Numbers biography
    • Born: 6 March 1897 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Annie Numbers began her education at Mrs Steele's Private School in Upper Gray Street in Edinburgh.
    • In 1907 she began her secondary education at Edinburgh Ladies' College (Mary Erskine's), 1907-1914.
    • She then went to Edinburgh University graduating with the degrees of MA (Hons), Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, 1918, and a B.Sc.
    • After a brief spell teaching she was appointed as Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator at the Department of Chemistry at Edinburgh University.
    • Annie Hutton Numbers joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1917 when living at 16 West Savile Terrace, Edinburgh.

  87. Fraser biography
    • with First Class Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in 1881 and was then appointed Second Mathematics Master, George Watson's College, Edinburgh [',' D Maclagan, Alexander Yule Fraser, Proc.
    • Edinburgh 18 (1890-91), 12-13.','1]:- .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in February 1883 and it was Fraser together with Andrew Jeffrey Gunion Barclay, also a mathematics master at George Watson's College at the time, together with Cargill Gilston Knott, an Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, who issued a circular 'to gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge and throughout Scotland generally whom they deemed likely to take an interest in such a Society' calling for a Mathematical Society to be set up.
    • EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY, .
    • It is suggested that the Society be formed, in the first instance, of all those who shall give in their names on or before February 2, 1883, and who are (1) present or former students in either of the Advanced Mathematical Classes of Edinburgh University, (2) Honours Graduates in any of the British Universities, or (3) recognised Teachers of Mathematics; and that, after the above mentioned date, members be nominated and elected by ballot in the usual manner.
    • Fraser became a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and was Secretary during 1883-88, and Treasurer during 1883-85.
    • While Mr Fraser was still a junior master at Watson's College, the idea occurred to him that there was room in Edinburgh for a Mathematical Society.
    • This led to the foundation of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, which is now in its ninth session, and has 150 members.
    • Fraser was elected to a fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 June 1885.
    • Edinburgh 18 (1890-91), 12-13.','1]:- .

  88. Levy Hyman biography
    • Born: 28 February 1889 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Hyman Levy's father was Marcus Levy (born in Russia about 1862) who was a picture frame maker and dealer in paintings in Edinburgh.
    • Levy attended George Heriot's School in Edinburgh, then entered the University of Edinburgh to study mathematics and physics.
    • He graduated from Edinburgh in 1911 with an M.A.
    • In 1916 Levy was honoured by being elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  89. Tweedie David biography
    • Died: 22 March 1934 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • David Tweedie attended Swinton Parish School from 1869 to 1879, then George Watson's School in Edinburgh for the two years 1879-1881.
    • He first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in 1881 at the age of sixteen years.
    • Tweedie graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1886 with an M.A.
    • He became a Mathematics Master at George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • In March 1892 Tweedie joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • After Elizabeth died in 1931, David Tweedie married Gladys Emily Jones in Edinburgh on 28 March 1933.

  90. Tweedie D J biography
    • Born: 17 October 1870 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • David J Tweedie was one of several members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society with the name of Tweedie.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination he first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1889.
    • In January 1897 Tweedie joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • At this time he was teaching at George Heriot's Hospital School in Edinburgh.
    • The move from Edinburgh seems to have made Tweedie decide that his membership of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was not now useful, and he left the Society in the following year.

  91. Rankine biography
    • Born: 5 July 1820 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • For two years from 1836 to 1838 Rankine studied at the University of Edinburgh, attending a wide range of lectures in science subjects, but choosing not to attend mathematics classes.
    • This was not Rankine's first experience of engineering for while he studied at Edinburgh University he had worked on the Edinburgh and Dalkeith Railway which his father was overseeing.
    • After his return to Edinburgh he undertook some investigative work with his father and they published An experimental inquiry into the advantages attending the use of cylindrical wheels on railways (1842).
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1849 and a fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1853.

  92. Scott Lang biography
    • Born: 8 October 1850 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Scott Lang was educated at the Edinburgh Institution, then at the University of Edinburgh.
    • in 1872 and in the same year was appointed as an assistant in Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University.
    • Scott Lang was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 January 1878.
    • Edinburgh 46 (1925-26), 370-371.

  93. Thomson W L biography
    • Died: 3 October 1951 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • His mother was Margaret Thomson (born Edinburgh about 1843).
    • After training at the Church of Scotland Training College in Edinburgh, he entered the University of Edinburgh to study mathematics and physics, graduating in 1891.
    • In 1899 J W Butters left George Heriot's School in Edinburgh to become Rector at the Academy in Ardrossan.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  94. Burgess biography
    • Alexander Burgess attended Wishaw Academy, then spent four years at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, before entering the University of Edinburgh in October 1890.
    • from Edinburgh with First Class Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in 1894.
    • After an appointment as a Mathematics Master at Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh, he was appointed Mathematical master and second master in Rothesay Academy.
    • He spent five years in this position then returned to Edinburgh in 1900 to work in the Mathematical department of Edinburgh Ladies' College.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 March 1902 having been proposed by John Alison, William Peddie, George Chrystal, and John Sturgeon Mackay.
    • Burgess was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, serving on the Committee from November 1906, serving as an editor of the Proceedings in 1907-08, then Secretary during 1908-11, vice-President in 1911-12, and as President of the Society in 1912-13.
    • This was a particularly important Presidency for in the summer of 1913 the Society held their first Colloquium in Edinburgh:- .
    • An obituary, written by Peter Comrie, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • by the University of Edinburgh in 1924 for his thesis Tripolar co-ordinates, straight line and circle.

  95. Greaves biography
    • Died: 24 December 1955 in Blackford, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • He held this position until 1938 when he was appointed to the chair of astronomy at the University of Edinburgh and Astronomer Royal for Scotland.
    • He was Professor of Astronomy at Edinburgh from 1938 until his death in 1955.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1939 having been proposed by James P Kendall, Max Born, Edmund G Dymond, Ruric W Wrigley, Edwin A Baker, and Sir E T Whittaker.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  96. Coutts biography
    • His mother was Elizabeth Martin Barron (born in St Cuthberts, Edinburgh about 1857).
    • He first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1904.
    • (Pure) by the University of Edinburgh in 1912.
    • After graduating, Coutts taught at George Heriot's School, Edinburgh.
    • William Baron Coutts was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 December 1913.
    • His obituary, written by J R H Whiston, appeared in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book (1948-1949), page 12.
    • Born at Kinghorn, Fifeshire, on May 26, 1885, he was educated at Edinburgh University and after a period as a schoolmaster was commissioned in 1915 to the R.G.A.
    • Coutts joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in November 1913.
    • He is one of quite a number who attended the 1913 Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium held in Edinburgh during the week beginning Monday 4th August 1913, then applied for membership of the Society.
    • After he became a Professor at the Military College of Science, he left the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  97. Smithies biography
    • Born: 10 March 1912 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • In fact it was their Socialist involvement which led to their meeting after Frank Senior moved to Edinburgh in 1907.
    • Roberts did an excellent job and ensured that Frank was in a good position to take the entrance examination for Edinburgh University in March 1927.
    • He passed the examination and matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1927.
    • With his father unable to obtain work, things were very difficult for Smithies in his first year at Edinburgh University, but it became easier in his second year when he was awarded a Spence Bursary.
    • In fact this was the second member of the Whittaker family who had lectured to Smithies for he had studied the history of mathematics with John Whittaker's father Edmund Whittaker while at Edinburgh University.

  98. Lockhart biography
    • He showed such outstanding abilities that the College offered him a position as a tutor in their Edinburgh branch.
    • He passed examinations of the Edinburgh University Preliminary Board, namely Higher Latin in September 1911, then Lower Dynamics, Higher English, Mathematics, and French in April 1912.
    • He began reading for a degree in mathematics and natural philosophy at the University of Edinburgh in October 1912, at age 26, but after completing two years, World War I began and he enlisted for military service.
    • After war service, which included periods spent in Gallipoli and Egypt, he resumed his studies at the University of Edinburgh in 1919, taking Natural Philosophy (Intermediate Honours Heat and Electricity) and on the 8th of July of the following year graduated M.A.
    • In October 1920 he was appointed as Mathematics Master at the Edinburgh Academy.
    • Lockhart spent the rest of his career at the Edinburgh Academy, being promoted to Head of Mathematics in 1940.
    • James Lockhart was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in December 1920 immediately after his appointment to the Edinburgh Academy.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1932, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Herbert Westren Turnbull, Charles G Barkla, Sir Charles Galton Darwin.
    • An obituary, written by S Read, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1970, pages 33-34.

  99. Kelland biography
    • In 1838 he was appointed Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh University in succession to William Wallace.
    • In Edinburgh, Kelland joined with James D Forbes, the Professor of Natural Philosophy, in supporting reforms of the Scottish university system.
    • For many years, Kelland served as secretary of the Senatus of Edinburgh University.
    • He was President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh during 1878-79, dying in office.
    • He was also active in the Edinburgh Society of Arts, a member of the Board of Visitors of the Edinburgh Observatory, an examiner for several of Edinburgh's schools and colleges, and a founder and actuarial adviser of the Life Association of Scotland.
    • In addition to his university duties, he gave mathematical lectures to the Edinburgh Ladies' Educational Association, and he took Sunday services in some of Edinburgh's Episcopal churches.
    • Edin., attempted to explain aspects of the important experiments of John Scott Russell, then being carried out near Edinburgh.

  100. Lumsden biography
    • Born: 19 September 1895 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Thomas Lumsden attended Public Schools from 1901 to 1906, then George Heriot's, Edinburgh, from 1906 to 1912.
    • He passed the Leaving Certificate and Edinburgh University Preliminary Examinations in Latin at Lower level and English at Higher level in April 1911, then Mathematics at Higher level in April 1912, passing Dynamics, and Science (also at Higher level) in September of that year.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination for Edinburgh University, he first matriculated in October 1912.
    • He returned to Edinburgh University to take a course in Honours Natural Philosophy in 1918-19.
    • After graduating Lumsden was appointed as an Assistant in Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh (under the Nichol Foundation) for session 1919-20.

  101. Tinney biography
    • She was awarded a National University of Ireland travelling studentship prize which enabled her to undertake research for her doctorate with Max Born at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
    • Born had been forced to flee from Germany when the Nazis came to power in 1933 and, after spells in north Italy and in Cambridge, he had been appointed to the Tait Chair of Applied Mathematics at Edinburgh in 1936.
    • Reinhold Henry Furth (1893-1979) was a Czechoslovakian physics professor at the German University of Prague before World War II but had come to the University of Edinburgh as a research fellow and lecturer.
    • degree in the Faculty of Arts, The University, Edinburgh.
    • Huan Wu Peng was a Chinese student who had come to the University of Edinburgh to study under Max Born.
    • by the University of Edinburgh in 1941 and in the same year she was appointed as an assistant lecturer at University College, Dublin.
    • In 1951 Sheila Power attended the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium held at the University of St Andrews.
    • Her father Michael Power also attended this Colloquium as he had the 1938 Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium held at the University of St Andrews, one year before his daughter went to undertake research in Edinburgh.
    • We note that R D Misra, who also worked in Born's research group at Edinburgh with Power, attended both the 1938 and 1951 Colloquia.
    • Of those in the 1942 Dublin Institute photograph above, Arthur Conway, Padraig de Brun and A J McConnell were also in St Andrews at the 1938 Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium.

  102. Moffat biography
    • Born: 18 June 1872 in Leith (near Edinburgh), Scotland .
    • He entered the University of Edinburgh, first matriculating in October 1890.
    • by the University of Edinburgh in 1893.
    • When he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1897 he gave his address as The Academy, Glasgow, and at this stage he gave only an M.A.
    • He remained a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society throughout his life.

  103. McCrea biography
    • After the award of his doctorate he was appointed as a lecturer in mathematics at the University of Edinburgh.
    • In Edinburgh his professor was Edmund Whittaker who had himself a major interest in astronomy having spent six years as Royal Astronomer in Dublin before his appointment to the chair in Edinburgh.
    • McCrea was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1931.
    • While holding the lectureship in Edinburgh he met Marian Nicol Core Webster who was the second daughter of Thomas Webster, an Edinburgh mining engineer.
    • After holding the lectureship in mathematics in Edinburgh for two years, he was appointed Reader in Mathematics at Imperial College, London, then in 1936 he was named Professor of Mathematics at Queen's University Belfast.
    • Longair writes [',' M Longair, Sir William Hunter McCrea, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book (2000), 192-194.','3]:- .
    • We noted above that he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (proposed by Sir Edmund Taylor Whittaker, Sir Charles Galton Darwin, Edward T Copson, and Charles Glover Barkla) and he was awarded their Keith Medal 1939-41.

  104. Calderwood biography
    • The family moved to Edinburgh when Daniel Calderwood was appointed as headmaster of the Church of Scotland Normal School in Edinburgh, and all Nora's education was in Edinburgh.
    • On 13 July 1907 Calderwood was awarded a bursary by the Edinburgh Burgh Committee on Secondary Education.
    • She then began her studies at Edinburgh Ladies' College, which she attended from 1907 to 1914.
    • In July 1913 Edinburgh Ladies College presented a gold medal to Calderwood as the dux of the music classes.
    • Having passed the Preliminary Examination in October 1914, Calderwood matriculated at the University of Edinburgh.
    • under the supervision of Alexander Aitken and was awarded a doctorate for her thesis Researches in the Theory of Matrices from the University of Edinburgh in 1931.
    • Calderwood joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1919 while she was still an undergraduate at Edinburgh University.

  105. Gregory biography
    • Died: October 1675 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • The notes Gregory made in discovering this result still exist written on the back of a letter sent to Gregory on 30 January 1671 by an Edinburgh bookseller.
    • Gregory left St Andrews for Edinburgh in 1674.
    • Writing after taking up his Edinburgh chair Gregory said:- .
    • In Edinburgh Gregory became the first person to hold the Chair of Mathematics there.

  106. Stewart biography
    • In 1741 he moved from working under one outstanding Scottish mathematician to working under another outstanding Scottish mathematician when he began to study with Maclaurin at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh.
    • He resigned as minister at Roseneath when he was appointed to Maclaurin's chair at Edinburgh in September 1747.
    • In 1772 his health began to deteriorate and his duties as professor at Edinburgh were taken over by his son Dugald.
    • was a founder member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, being elected a fellow of the first meeting of its physical class on 3 November 1783.
    • After the death of his father, Dugald Stewart resigned from the Chair of Mathematics at Edinburgh when he was appointed Professor of Moral Philosophy at Edinburgh.
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  107. Lonie biography
    • Died: 4 January 1894 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • At the close of the mathematical examination, Professor Kelland [Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh] congratulated Mr Lonie on the appearance which his classes had made; and expressed a confident expectation that the evident talent and energy of the new master will speedily enable him to make the appearances of his classes all that is either possible or desirable in such a school.
    • Asked about whether the burgh school system meets the needs of the whole community, Lonie answers [',' Reports from the Commissioners Education Scotland Session 1867-68 XXIX Appendix (Thomas Constable, Edinburgh, 1868).','4]:- .
    • Asked about which subjects should be compulsory and which optional, he replies [',' Reports from the Commissioners Education Scotland Session 1867-68 XXIX Appendix (Thomas Constable, Edinburgh, 1868).','4]:- .
    • He also believes that parents do not necessarily have correct ideas about the best subjects for their children to study [',' Reports from the Commissioners Education Scotland Session 1867-68 XXIX Appendix (Thomas Constable, Edinburgh, 1868).','4]:- .

  108. Pullar biography
    • Died: 31 August 1940 in Morningside, Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Pullar joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1898 when he was at the Academy in Montrose.
    • Mary Pullar died in Edinburgh in 1940, and David Pullar, who was a mining engineer, also died in Edinburgh on 10 November 1967.
    • David Pullar was unmarried and left his home at 1 Ravelston Terrace, Edinburgh, to the Rev.

  109. Bath biography
    • He held the lectureship in St Andrews until 1937 when he moved to Edinburgh.
    • When Frederick Bath resigned his position in Dundee in 1936 on his appointment to Edinburgh University, Walter Ledermann filled the vacancy.
    • Bath taught at Edinburgh from 1937 to 1945.
    • At St George's Church, Headstone, on 4 April 1940, Frederick Bath, Edinburgh University, to Olga, daughter of Dr and Mrs H B Heywood, Harrow, Middlesex.
    • At Queen Mary Nursing Home, Edinburgh, on 17 May 1942, to Olga, wife of Frederick Bath, a daughter.
    • Bath was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in June 1928.
    • Frederick Bath was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1929, his proposers being John Edward Aloysius Steggall, Herbert Westren Turnbull, David Waterston, Herbert Stanley Allen.
    • An obituary, written by W L Edge, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1984, pages 167-169.

  110. Darwin C G biography
    • After five years at Cambridge, Darwin was appointed Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh in 1924.
    • Before taking up the post he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1923.
    • Before he took up the appointment in Edinburgh, Darwin had been elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1922.
    • The Royal Medal of the Royal Society has been awarded to Professor C G Darwin, F.R.S., of the Tate Chair of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, for his researches in mathematical physics, especially in quantum mechanics.
    • On 3 March 1924 he was made a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, having been proposed by Sir James Alfred Ewing, Charles Glover Barkla, William Archer Tait, and Sir Edmund T Whittaker.
    • He was awarded the Gunning Victoria Jubilee Prize 1932-6 of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • In 1936 Darwin left Edinburgh to take up the position of Master of Christ's College, Cambridge.
    • He was awarded honorary degrees by the universities of Bristol, California, Chicago, Edinburgh, Delhi, Dublin, Manchester, and St Andrews.
    • We mentioned above that Darwin was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  111. Macdonald James biography
    • He first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1884.
    • It is not entirely clear [to the writers of this biography] why he graduated eleven years after first matriculating, but given that he became a rector and was made a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh two years after graduating, it is reasonable to assume that he must have taught in schools during these eleven years.
    • Certainly the record of courses he took at Edinburgh University contains a break between session 1887-88 and session 1893-94 and there is no record of him attending any courses in the five intervening sessions.
    • At Edinburgh he was awarded the Fergusson Scholarship in Mathematics, the Neil Arnott Scholarship in Physics and the Maclaren Scholarship in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.
    • at the University of Edinburgh.
    • A member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, Macdonald joined in February 1896 while teaching in Leith but before his appointment as Headmaster there.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 June 1897, his proposers being George Chrystal, Peter Guthrie Tait, Alexander Crum Brown, Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • An obituary, written anonymously, appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Volume 57 (1936-37), 436.
    • Mr Macdonald was educated at Edinburgh University, where he graduated with first class honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, and obtained the Fergusson Scholarship in Mathematics, the Neil Arnott Scholarship in Physics and the Maclaren Scholarship in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.

  112. Keill biography
    • Born: 1 December 1671 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • John's father was Robert Keill who was an Edinburgh lawyer.
    • John attended school in Edinburgh, then studied at Edinburgh University under David Gregory obtaining his degree in 1692 with distinction in both mathematics and physics.

  113. Williamson biography
    • He attended the Edinburgh Academy from 1912 to 1919.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, Williamson first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1919.
    • As an undergraduate at Edinburgh, Williamson studied Ordinary Mathematics, Natural Philosophy and Greek in session 1919-20.
    • Turnbull writes [',' H W Turnbull, John Williamson obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952), 23-24.','1]:- .
    • Williamson was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1928 having been proposed by Herbert Westren Turnbull, Sir Edmund Taylor Whittaker, Ralph Allan Sampson, and Charles Glover Barkla.
    • On 1 February 1924, when he was a Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of St Andrews, Williamson joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.
    • Also [',' H W Turnbull, John Williamson obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952), 23-24.','1]:- .

  114. Wilson Alexander biography
    • Died: 18 October 1786 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Wilson was awarded an honorary degree by the University of St Andrews on 6 August 1763 and was a founding member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1783.
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  115. Whittaker John biography
    • His father, Mary's grandfather, was Sir Thomas Boyd who had been Lord Provost of Edinburgh and had a major role in the founding of the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary and four Edinburgh Schools including George Watson's College.
    • His parents moved again, this time to Edinburgh in Scotland, in 1912.
    • He then attended St Salvator's School in St Andrews until he won a scholarship to Fettes Academy in Edinburgh.
    • Then at the age of 15 he entered Edinburgh University where he became friends with Hodge who was in the same class.
    • He spent two years as an Assistant Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh (1927-29) where his father E T Whittaker held the Chair of Mathematics, and during this time he was awarded a D.Sc.
    • by Edinburgh University and a Smith's Prize by Cambridge.

  116. Madwar biography
    • This exempted him from sitting the Preliminary Examination for the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and his first matriculation there was in October 1914.
    • On his matriculation form he gave his home address as Custom House, Alexandria, Egypt, and his Edinburgh address as Rosehill, Corstorphine.
    • Madwar's university studies at the University of Edinburgh included courses in Chemistry (taught by Dr Dobbin), Natural Philosophy (taught by Dr Carse and Dr Barkla), and Mathematics (taught by Dr Horsburgh) in session 1914-15.
    • He won two medals during his studies at Edinburgh.
    • He then continued to live in Edinburgh, working for the year 1918-19 as an assistant engineer for Lesly Co.
    • He was then awarded a scholarship which enabled him to return to Scotland to study for his doctorate at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1925.
    • by Edinburgh University in 1926.
    • In 1926 he became an Associate member of the Royal Civil Engineering Society and in the following year was elected to the Royal Society of London and the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  117. Third biography
    • Died: 11 August 1948 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Third joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1897.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was not the only British mathematical society that Third joined for, on 9 May 1901, he paid the life-composition fee of the London Mathematical Society and became a member for life.
    • After retiring, Third moved to Edinburgh where he spent the final 20 years of his life.

  118. Copson biography
    • with First Class Honours in Mathematics in 1922 and was appointed by Whittaker to a lecturing post in Edinburgh in the same year.
    • Whittaker interviewed Copson on the platform of Windemere station and offered him a lectureship in mathematics at the University of Edinburgh while on the train.
    • by Edinburgh in 1928 and remained on the staff there until 1930, when he was appointed Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of St Andrews under Turnbull.
    • Copson was honoured by election to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1924 and was awarded the Keith Prize of the Society in 1941 for an outstanding series of papers published in the Proceedings.
    • He also served the Edinburgh Mathematical Society being Secretary (1924-30), editor of the Proceedings, and President on two occasions, 1930 and 1954-55.
    • Honorary Edinburgh Mathematical Society Members: E T Copson and M F Atiyah .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of E T Copson .
    • 5.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1979 .

  119. Turner John biography
    • Turner first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1886 when he was fifteen years old.
    • He took up the position of Assistant Mathematical Master at The Edinburgh High School in session 1892-93.
    • Edin., a classics scholar, was Rector of The Edinburgh High School when Turner was appointed.
    • In November 1894, Turner joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • By this time he was a mathematics master at the Royal High School, Edinburgh.
    • He was Editor of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society from 1904, then was Honorary Treasurer of the Society from 1905 to 1909.
    • After he retired in 1933, he remained a member, giving his address as 110 Findhorn Place, Edinburgh, 9.
    • He reached the positions of Depute Rector and Principal Teacher of Mathematics at the Royal High School, Edinburgh, before he retired.
    • (Oxon.), LL.D., F.R.S.E., a classics scholar, was Rector of the Edinburgh Royal High School during the last thirteen years the Turner taught there.

  120. Atiyah biography
    • Lily, born in Edinburgh in 1928, was the daughter of a dock worker at the Rosyth naval yard.
    • She had studied mathematics first at the University of Edinburgh and then took the Cambridge Tripos.
    • Atiyah has published a number of highly influential books: K-theory (1967); (with I G Macdonald) Introduction to commutative algebra (1969); Vector fields on manifolds (1970); Elliptic operators and compact groups (1974); Geometry on Yang-Mills fields (1979); (with N J Hitchin) The geometry and dynamics of magnetic monopoles (1988); The geometry and physics of knots (1990); (Video) The mysteries of space (1992); Siamo tutti Matematici Ⓣ (2007); and Edinburgh Lectures on Geometry, Analysis and Physics (2010).
    • Among the prizes that he has received are the Feltrinelli Prize from the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei in 1981, the King Faisal International Prize for Science in 1987, the Gunning Victoria Jubilee Prize from the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1990, the Benjamin Franklin Medal in 1993, the Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medal in 1993, the Order of Andres Bello (1st Class) from the Republic of Venezuela in 1997, the Royal Medal from the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2003, the Order of Merit (Gold) from the Lebanon in 2005, and the President's Medal from the Institute of Physics in 2008.
    • Many universities have awarded him an honorary degree including: Bonn (1968), Warwick (1969), Durham (1979), St Andrews (1981), Trinity College Dublin (1983), Chicago (1983), Edinburgh (1984), Cambridge (1984), Essex (1985), London (1985), Sussex (1986), Ghent (1987), Reading (1990), Helsinki (1990), Leicester (1991), Rutgers (1992), Salamanca (1992), Montreal (1993), Waterloo (1993), Wales (1993), Queen's-Kingston (1994), Keele (1994), Birmingham (1994), Open University (1995), Manchester (1996), Chinese University of Hong Kong (1996), Brown University (1997), Oxford (1998), University of Wales Swansea (1998), Charles University Prague (1998), Heriot-Watt University (1999), University of Mexico (2001), American University of Beirut (2004), York (2005), Harvard University (2006), Scuola Normale Pisa (2007), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (2008).
    • Honorary Edinburgh Mathematical Society Members: E T Copson and M F Atiyah .
    • 13.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1979 .

  121. Beattie biography
    • Carruthers Beattie attended St John's Boarding School in Workington for seven years, then spent a year at Moray House in Edinburgh before beginning his university education.
    • He was an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh matriculating in October 1885.
    • from the University of Edinburgh in 1896 for his thesis The Behaviour of Bismuth Plates in a Steady Magnetic Field.
    • by the University of Edinburgh.
    • Sir Carruthers Beattie is an alumnus and Doctor of Science of Edinburgh, who went to Cape Town as Professor of Physics thirty years ago, and soon traversed the heart of the African continent in the course of a magnetic survey.
    • Beattie was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in November 1891.
    • John Carruthers Beattie was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 March 1897, his proposers being Sir W Thomson (Lord Kelvin), Peter Guthrie Tait, Alexander Crum Brown, Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • An obituary, written by Lawrence Crawford, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947.

  122. Gregory David biography
    • However in 1683 Pitcairne publicly challenged John Young, who had taught mathematics at Edinburgh University since James Gregory's death, as to his suitability to do so.
    • It led to Young being dismissed and, at the age of 24, David Gregory was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, filling the chair previously held by his uncle.
    • At Edinburgh David Gregory taught some Newtonian theories but it now realised that he laid much less influence on this than was at one time thought.
    • He lectured at Edinburgh University on optics, geometry, mechanics and hydrostatics.
    • Gregory himself published Exercitatio geometria de dimensione curvarum in 1684 while at Edinburgh which was an interesting work developing his uncle's work on infinite series.
    • In 1691, the year after Presbyterianism was established as the official state religion in Scotland, Gregory resigned the mathematical chair at the University of Edinburgh and assumed the Savilian Professorship of Astronomy at Oxford.
    • In 1692 Gregory was made a fellow of Balliol College and was awarded a degree from Oxford for a thesis on optics which he based on the lectures he had given in Edinburgh.
    • Gregory spent some months in Edinburgh in his role with the Scottish mint working on bringing the Scottish currency into line with that of England.

  123. Morrison biography
    • School, spending seven years at this school, but attended George Watson's College, Edinburgh, for three years before matriculating at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Morrison left Edinburgh University before completing his B.Sc., taking up a position in physics at Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh, in 1886.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in February 1883 and Morrison was one of the founder members although he was only an Edinburgh undergraduate at the time.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1892, his proposers being Peter Guthrie Tait, Alexander Crum Brown, Alexander Buchan, Cargill Gilston Knott.
    • An obituary, written by Alexander Brown, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1945, page 20.

  124. Thomson William biography
    • William Thomson was educated at Perth Academy and then at the University of Edinburgh.
    • In the same year he was appointed as an Assistant in Mathematics at Edinburgh University, a position he held until 1883.
    • During his time in Edinburgh Thomson was an assistant to the professor who was, at that time, George Chrystal.
    • When Thomson left Edinburgh in 1883, Allardice succeeded him as Chrystal's assistant.
    • Thomson was an assistant at Edinburgh University when the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 but he did not join the Society at this time, rather he joined in December 1888 when he was Professor of Mathematics at Stellenbosch, Cape Colony.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1882, his proposers being George Chrystal, Peter Guthrie Tait, Alexander Crum Brown, Sir William Turner.
    • An obituary, written by J M Watt, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1948/1949, pages 48-49.

  125. Merriles biography
    • After having passed Preliminary Examination he first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1899.
    • He also attended Moray House Training College, Edinburgh, between 1899 and 1902.
    • At Edinburgh University, among the courses Merriles took at Ordinary level were Latin, Education, Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and English.
    • During his period as an undergraduate at Edinburgh University, Merriles also taught arithmetic and mathematics at Moray House Practising School, both Elementary and Upper, between May 1902 and October 1904.
    • After graduating Merriles taught mathematics and science at the Edinburgh Provincial Training College from April 1905 to September 1919.
    • He was appointed to George Watson's Ladies College, Edinburgh, on 16 September 1919.
    • Merriles joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1905, the year in which he graduated from Edinburgh University.

  126. Bevan-Baker biography
    • During World War I he served with the Friends Ambulance Unit in Italy, then after ending his war service he taught for a short time at University College, London before being appointed as a Lecturer in Mathematics at Edinburgh University in 1920.
    • He had married Margaret Stewart Barbour in Edinburgh in 1918; they had five children, three girls and two boys.
    • In 1924 Baker left Edinburgh when he was appointed Professor of Mathematics in Royal Holloway College, University of London.
    • Baker was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1920.
    • Baker served the Society as Secretary from 1921 until he left Edinburgh in 1924.
    • Bevan Baker was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Cargill G Knott, Ellice M Horsburgh, Alexander H Freeland Barbour.
    • An obituary, written by E T Copson, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1964, pages 7-8.

  127. Macdonald biography
    • Born: 19 January 1865 in Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Hector was the older of his parents two sons and, as a young child, he lived in Edinburgh.

  128. Ford biography
    • From 1914 he lectured at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, where he was appointed as Junior Lecturer in Mathematics following the death of John Urquhart.
    • The following article appeared in an Edinburgh student magazine called The Gambolier [',' Lester R Ford., M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics, University of Edinburgh, The Gambolier VII (12) (Wednesday, 27 January 1915), 140.','2]:- .
    • It was during his period in Edinburgh that he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1914.
    • He published An introduction to the theory of automorphic functions as an Edinburgh Mathematical Tract No 6 in 1915.
    • Ford read a paper to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society On a class of continued fractions at the second meeting of the 1916-17 session.
    • The paper, submitted in 1917, gives Ford's address as The University of Edinburgh.

  129. Scott Robert biography
    • Born: 28 July 1849 in Leith, near Edinburgh, Scotland .
    • Robert's mother was Mary Forsyth, son of the Edinburgh advocate Robert Forsyth.
    • Robert Scott was educated at the High School, Edinburgh, then in Stuttgart before becoming a student at University College, London.

  130. McDuff biography
    • Her father, Conrad Hal Waddington, was appointed Professor of Genetics at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland while her mother, Margaret Justin Blanco White, was an architect who had a Civil Service post in Edinburgh.
    • Dusa was educated at a girls school in Edinburgh and, although the standard was less good than at the boys school, nevertheless she had an exceptionally good mathematics teacher.
    • By the time that Dusa completed her secondary schooling in Edinburgh she had a boyfriend.
    • This led to her choosing the University of Edinburgh for her undergraduate studies, turning down a scholarship which she had won to go to Cambridge University.
    • During her undergraduate years at Edinburgh Dusa married her boyfriend and took his name becoming Dusa McDuff.
    • from Edinburgh in 1967, Dusa went to Girton College, Cambridge for her doctoral studies.
    • She has continued to receive prestigious awards such as honorary degrees from the University of Edinburgh (1997) and the University of York (2000).

  131. Spence biography
    • John Galt, who was a school friend of Spence and continued the friendship throughout his life, writes [',' J Galt, The Life of William Spence, in John Herschel (ed.), Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1819), i-v.','4]:- .
    • Struthers was a remarkable man who [',' J Galt, The Life of William Spence, in John Herschel (ed.), Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1819), i-v.','4]:- .
    • This work, published by John Murray and Archibald Constable, London and Edinburgh, in 1809 showed him as one of the first British mathematicians to be familiar with the work of Lagrange and Arbogast.
    • After spending a while in Greenock, they set out to travel to Edinburgh as the first leg of their journey back to England.
    • After Spence died, John Herschel edited Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence which was published by Oliver and Boyd in Edinburgh in 1819.
    • The book, which cost £1 16s, was reviewed in [',' Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence, Esq., The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal 7 (1822), 194.','5]:- .
    • Galt writes [',' J Galt, The Life of William Spence, in John Herschel (ed.), Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1819), i-v.','4]:- .
    • In [',' J Galt, The Life of William Spence, in John Herschel (ed.), Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1819), i-v.','4] Galt gives this tribute to Spence:- .

  132. Gillespie biography
    • He began to publish a series of important papers in the Cambridge Philosophical Society and in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Robert Gillespie was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1925 when he was a research student at Cambridge, although the address he gave was that of his parents: Ashcot, Kilbarchan Road, Johnstone.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1933, his proposers being Thomas Murray MacRobert, Neil McArthur, Richard Alexander Robb, William Arthur.
    • An obituary, written by Robert A Rankin, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1978, pages 31-32.
    • In this RSE obituary Gillespie's books Integration (Edinburgh, 1939) and Partial Differentiation (Edinburgh, 1951), both published in Oliver & Boyd's series of university mathematical texts, are mentioned.
    • Their son Alastair Gillespie is a mathematician who has also been President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, serving in this capacity from 2001 to 2003.

  133. Brash biography
    • William Brash's father was Robert Brash (born in West Calder, Edinburgh about 1852) who was a vanman and later a stableman.
    • To prepare for his university studies, Brash then went to George Watson's Boys' College, Edinburgh, when he spent two years.
    • In July 1905 Brash won the Medal for Mathematics from George Watson's and in October of the same year he first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Not only did Brash win bursaries at George Watson's, but he also won a Edinburgh University bursary.
    • Edinburgh University bursaries: October 1905 John Welsh Mathematical Bursary (subject of examination - mathematics, especially pure geometry) William Brash, George Watson's College.
    • Brash returned to West Calder after studying in Edinburgh, then in 1915 he moved to Stirling when he was appointed to Stirling High School.
    • As many Edinburgh mathematics graduates did, Brash joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society after graduating.

  134. McIntosh biography
    • in 1890 and, in the same year, was appointed as a Teacher at George Watson's Boys' College in Edinburgh.
    • He taught there until 1899 when he was appointed as Head of Mathematics at Edinburgh Ladies' College.
    • We have explained that McIntosh served as Head of Mathematics at Edinburgh Ladies' College, but mathematics was not his only academic interest.
    • McIntosh was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1895.
    • He was also a fellow of the Royal Physical Society and was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 February 1903, his proposers being John Sturgeon Mackay, Sir Francis Grant Ogilvie, Sir John Murray, Alexander Morgan.
    • An obituary, written by James Ritchie, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1958, pages 40-41.

  135. Keldysh Mstislav biography
    • FRSE, Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook (1979), 46-47.','20]:- .
    • FRSE, Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook (1979), 46-47.','20]:- .
    • FRSE, Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook (1979), 46-47.','20]:- .
    • FRSE, Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook (1979), 46-47.','20]:- .
    • He led a delegation which visited the Royal Society of Edinburgh in February 1965 and those who were privileged to attend the dinner which our President, the late Professor J N Davidson, gave in his honour, will recall the impression which his speech on that occasion made on his audience - especially an impromptu part on the influence of Scott on Russian literature occasioned by his discovery (of only that evening) that Scott had been President of the Society.
    • He was elected to many academies: the Mongolian Academy of Sciences (1961), the Polish Academy of Sciences (1962), the Czech Academy of Sciences (1962), the Romanian Academy of Sciences (1965), the German Academy of Sciences (1966), the Saxony Academy of Sciences in Leipzig (1966), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1966), the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (1966), the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (1970), and was elected an Honorary Foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 July 1968.

  136. Smeal biography
    • In 1914 Smeal was appointed as Assistant Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    • In December 1919 he was promoted to Lecturer in Mathematics at Edinburgh (at the same time as Raymond W Brink).
    • Smeal's letter of resignation was put to the Court of Edinburgh University on 25 April 1921.
    • Edinburgh University appointed George Robinson as Smeal's successor at Edinburgh.
    • Smeal joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1914 soon after his appointment as an Assistant at Edinburgh.

  137. Turnbull biography
    • The first was given at a meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1942 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of Newton's birth.
    • The second was given at a meeting of Edinburgh University's Mathematical and Physical Society.
    • He was also elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh, receiving their Keith Medal and Gunning Victoria Jubilee Prize.
    • 7.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1954 .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  138. Frewin biography
    • Leslie was born in Glasgow but his family had moved to Portobello, near Edinburgh, before he entered George Watson's Boy's College, Edinburgh, in 1908 just before he was six years old.
    • He passed the Preliminary Examination for Edinburgh University in October 1920 and matriculated to begin his studies in session 1920-21.
    • Frewin joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1923, immediately following his graduation.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Frewin the went to New College, Oxford where he undertook further study and returned to Edinburgh in 1925 when appointed to George Watson's College, Edinburgh.

  139. Jack William biography
    • Edinburgh 44 (1923-24), 255-257.','1]:- .
    • Edinburgh 44 (1923-24), 255-257.','1]:- .
    • While holding this post he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 May 1875.
    • In the same year that he was elected to a fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Jack was honoured with the award of an LL.D.
    • Edinburgh 44 (1923-24), 255-257.','1]:- .
    • William Jack was elected an honorary member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1902.

  140. MacRobert biography
    • We should say something of MacRobert's involvement with three Scottish societies; the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Glasgow Mathematical Association.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for many years and served as President of the Society in 1921-22.
    • his scheme was that the Proceedings should be retained for research papers, but that the Society should publish in place of the Mathematical Notes a new periodical, to be called the Journal of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, which would contain articles on History, Methods of Teaching, Notes, Discussions on Elementary Mathematics, etc.
    • No further meetings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society took place in Glasgow until after MacRobert retired.
    • MacRobert was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921 proposed by George Alexander Gibson, Andrew Gray, James Gordon Gray, and Robert Alexander Houstoun.

  141. Dougall biography
    • Dougall was an excellent research mathematician publishing articles on both pure and applied mathematics in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh awarded him their Makdougall-Brisbane Prize 1902-4.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in April 1885, in the third session of the new Society, while he was still an undergraduate at Glasgow University.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921, his proposers being George Alexander Gibson, Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Cargill Gilston Knott, James Gordon Gray.
    • An obituary, written by Ian N Sneddon, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1962, pages 33-34.

  142. Jack biography
    • From there went to the University of Edinburgh but soon after this World War I started.
    • At first he was able to continue with his studies and, for example, he was awarded a First Class Certificate in the Second Ordinary Class in Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh taught by Lester R Ford in June 1915.
    • After graduating, Jack began research in physics at Edinburgh University under George Carse.
    • Jack was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1920 immediately after graduating from Edinburgh with his first degree.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 March 1930, his proposers being Herbert Stanley Allen, Herbert Westren Turnbull, William Saddler, Charles Glover Barkla.
    • An obituary, written by E T Copson, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1976, pages 54-55.

  143. Rankin biography
    • The Rev Oliver Rankin became Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature and Theology in the University of Edinburgh in 1937.
    • Robert attended Garlieston School and from there went to Fettes College, an independent school in Edinburgh.
    • Rankin graduated in 1937 and in the same year his father became Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature and Theology at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1955, he received the Society's Keith Prize for his publications in 1961-63.
    • He contributed an excellent article on Robert Simson to the archive based on a lecture he gave at the Royal Society of Edinburgh; one which I was fortunate enough to hear.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society: the first hundred years (1883-1983) Part 1 .

  144. Grieve biography
    • In 1903, he was awarded a MacDougall Bursary of £25 to attend Edinburgh University.
    • Grieve first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1903.
    • with First Class Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy from Edinburgh University in April 1908.
    • for this research and joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in November 1923.
    • Inspector of Schools and lived in Orchardhead Road, Liberton, Edinburgh.
    • Isabella died at 16 Orchardhead Road, Liberton, Edinburgh on 1 December 1930 and Grieve married Eliza McPherson on 16 July 1932 at Duke of Gordon Hotel, Kingussie, Inverness.
    • Inspector of Schools having only shortly moved there from Edinburgh.

  145. Sang biography
    • At Edinburgh University during 1818 - 1824, he impressed professors William Wallace and John Leslie in mathematics and natural philosophy, despite periods of illness.
    • Sang first worked in Edinburgh as surveyor, civil engineer and mathematics teacher and lectured on natural philosophy.
    • He resigned against the Sultan's wishes, returning to Edinburgh in 1854 to teach mathematics.
    • An active Fellow of the Royal Scottish Society of Arts and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, he received awards from both and from the Institution of Civil Engineers, London (1879).
    • of Edinburgh University and an honorary member of the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia.
    • Mainly in Edinburgh-based journals, Sang wrote extensively on mathematical, mechanical, optical and actuarial topics including vibration of wires, a theory of toothed wheels, an improved lighthouse light, railways, bridges, manufacturing and life insurance.

  146. Meiklejohn biography
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination he first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1892.
    • He went to the University of Edinburgh to study classics and in his first session studied Ordinary Latin and Greek.
    • Henry Jack writes [',' H Jack, John Meiklejohn obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952) 24-25.','1]:- .
    • Meiklejohn joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1898, in the year in which he graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK.
    • As to his hobbies, Henry Jack writes [',' H Jack, John Meiklejohn obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952) 24-25.','1]:- .

  147. McCowan biography
    • In fact references to McCowan in the Minutes of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1885 wrongly put M.A.
    • In January 1885 McCowan was proposed for membership of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society by Thomas Muir, the proposal being seconded by Andrew Barclay.
    • McCowan read papers at meetings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society frequently during a very active period between 1891 and 1895.
    • A regular attendee at meetings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, he presented the papers: On a representation of elliptic integrals by curvilinear arcs (12 June 1891); On the solution of non-linear partial differential equations of the second order (13 May 1892); and Note on the solution of partial differential equations by the method of reciprocation (11 November 1892).
    • of Edinburgh.
    • At the meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society on 14 December 1900, the chairman, John Watt Butters, made a sympathetic reference to the death of Dr John McCowan who was president of the society during Session 1894-95.

  148. Ruse biography
    • at Oxford he was awarded the Bruce of Grangehill Research Scholarship by the University of Edinburgh.
    • He was appointed as a Lecturer in Mathematics in Edinburgh University in 1928 and held this position until 1937.
    • Ruse joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1927.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 March 1931, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, Sir Charles G Darwin, Edward Thomas Copson, Charles Glover Barkla.
    • An obituary, written by A W Goldie, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1975, pages 47-48.

  149. Ledermann biography
    • In 1937 he became a temporary lecturer in Dundee but the most fruitful work he undertook during this period was as a private assistant to Professor Sir Godfrey Thomson at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Thomson headed the Moray House Group at Edinburgh which was undertaking research into intelligence testing.
    • The quality of the work Ledermann undertook at this time is clearly shown from the fact that Edinburgh awarded him a D.Sc.
    • While in Edinburgh Ledermann also worked with Max Born and A C Aitken.
    • Ledermann has received honours for his work which include election to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1944) and an honorary doctorate from the Open University (1993).

  150. Peddie biography
    • William Peddie attended Kirkwall Grammar School, Orkney, and then studied at the University of Edinburgh, being awarded a B.Sc.
    • He was appointed as an Assistant in Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University in 1883 becoming a Lecturer in 1892.
    • He married Jessie Isabella Dott (born in Edinburgh about 1864) in 1891.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1887 having been proposed by Peter Guthrie Tait, Sir Thomas Muir, George Chrystal, and Alexander Crum Brown.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  151. McWhan biography
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, The Mathematical Association, and the Glasgow Mathematical Association.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1908 and remained a member throughout his life.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921, his proposers being George Alexander Gibson, Andrew Gray, Robert Alexander Houstoun, James Gordon Gray.
    • An obituary, written by R A Houstoun, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1944, page 24.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association.

  152. Somerville biography
    • When Mary was ten years old she was sent to Miss Primrose's boarding school for girls in Musselburgh (a few miles east of Edinburgh on the Firth of Forth).
    • When Mary was about thirteen, the family rented a house in Edinburgh where they spent the winter months, the summers being spent in Burntisland.
    • Social life in Edinburgh was strongly encouraged, however, where Mary enjoyed [',' E C Patterson, Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (New York 1970-1990).','1]:- .
    • In particular John Playfair, then professor of natural philosophy at Edinburgh, encouraged her and through him she began a correspondence with William Wallace (Playfair's former pupil) who was then professor of mathematics at the Royal Military College at Great Marlow.
    • At this time William and Mary lived in Edinburgh and, advised by Wallace, Mary read the most advanced French texts of the day.
    • When William Somerville was appointed as Inspector to the Army Medical Board in 1816, the family moved from Edinburgh to London.

  153. Weatherhead biography
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, Weatherhead first matriculated at the University of Edinburgh in October 1916 where he was awarded the John Welsh Mathematical Scholarship.
    • After the war ended he returned to Edinburgh University in 1919 and graduated with an M.A.
    • in Edinburgh and by 1925 he had qualified to become a fellow of The Faculty of Actuaries.
    • In December 1935 he was appointed as an external examiner in Actuarial Mathematics for the University of Edinburgh.
    • Mr Weatherhead has had a successful professional career in Edinburgh, where he relinquished the position of joint actuary of the Scottish Equitable Life Assurance Society to take up service with our Company, and we welcome him as a valuable addition to our staff.
    • Finally we note that Weatherhead was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in November 1925.

  154. Gray Andrew biography
    • Gray then received private tuition in Edinburgh before entering the University of Glasgow in 1872.
    • On 5 March 1883, Gray was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Gray wrote a number of excellent books and published many papers in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the Royal Society of London.
    • Edinburgh 45 (1924-25), 373-377.','3]:- .
    • Also during this latter period of his life he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1922.

  155. Gibson biography
    • He was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and was President of the Society 1888-89.
    • In 1902 he was made an Honorary Member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 December 1889 having been proposed by Sir William Thomson (Lord Kelvin), William Jack, Sir Thomas Muir, and George Chrystal.
    • He was also honoured with an Hon LL.D from Edinburgh University in 1905, and a similar degree from Glasgow University in 1927.
    • For further information on Gibson, see his obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Proceedings at THIS LINK .

  156. McVittie biography
    • George entered the University of Edinburgh in 1923.
    • He graduated in 1928 with an M.A., and then studied for a doctorate, beginning work in Edinburgh with Whittaker as advisor, and continuing at Christ's College Cambridge with Eddington as his advisor.
    • McVittie held appointments as follows: Assistant Lecturer at Leeds University 1930-34; Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh 1933-34; Reader at King's College, University of London 1936-48; Professor at Queen Mary's College, University of London 1948-52; Professor at Illinois University Observatory 1952-1972; and Honorary Professor at the University of Kent at Canterbury 1972-1988.
    • McVittie was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 March 1943, having been proposed by David Gibb, Ivor M H Etherington, Robert Schlapp, and Alexander C Aitken.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, being elected in December 1927.

  157. Bonsall biography
    • After the award of his first degree, Bonsall had to choose between remaining at Oxford to undertake research or take up a temporary one-year lectureship at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
    • He chose to spend the year lecturing in Edinburgh and there he met W W Rogosinski who had just been appointed to the chair of mathematics at Newcastle.
    • In 1963, the University of Edinburgh instituted a second chair of mathematics, the Maclaurin chair.
    • In 1984, Bonsall retired from his chair at the University of Edinburgh and, together with his wife Jill, moved to Harrogate and there he was able to indulge his passion for gardening as well as continuing to undertake research and write papers.
    • These honours include election as a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1966 and to the Royal Society in 1970.
    • He served the Edinburgh Mathematical Society as President in 1976-77.

  158. Roach biography
    • One interest he does not mention in his CV is his love of [',' A McBride, Gary Francis Roach, OStJ, FRAS, FIMA, FRSA, Royal Society of Edinburgh.','2]:- .
    • Other interests are detailed in [',' A McBride, Gary Francis Roach, OStJ, FRAS, FIMA, FRSA, Royal Society of Edinburgh.','2]:- .
    • Roach received many honours including being elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1977), awarded a D.Sc.
    • He was president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1981-82).
    • FRSE is fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  159. Briggs biography
    • Briggs made the difficult journey from London to Edinburgh to see Napier in the summer of 1615.
    • A description of their meeting was told by John Marr to William Lilly who writes the following (see [',' G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.','6]):- .
    • Mr Briggs appoints a certain day when to meet at Edinburgh; but failing thereof, Merchiston was fearful he would not come.
    • Napier replied that he had had the same idea but ([',' G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.','6]):- .
    • He spent a month with Napier on his first visit of 1615, made a second journey from London to Edinburgh to visit Napier again in 1616, and would have made yet a third visit the following year but Napier died in the spring before the planned summer visit.

  160. Ivory biography
    • James junior, the subject of this biography, was educated at Dundee Academy, then at the University of St Andrews, completing his studies at Edinburgh University.
    • His time at Edinburgh University was supposed to end in him completing his theological studies leading to his ordination, but he changed his plans after enjoying mathematics, physics and philosophy courses in Edinburgh taught by John Playfair, Dugald Stewart and others.
    • He was also honoured by many foreign scientific societies such as the Gottingen Academy in 1814, the Prussian Academy in 1826, the Academy of Sciences in Paris in 1828, the Academy of Modena in 1829, the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1935, and the Irish Academy in 1839.

  161. McLeod biography
    • In 1958, after completing the work for his D.Phil., McLeod was appointed as a lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He spent two years in Edinburgh before being appointed as a fellow of Wadham College, Oxford in 1960.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1974 and a fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1992.
    • He received the Whittaker Prize from the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1965 and the Keith Medal and Prize from the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1987.

  162. Fuchs Klaus biography
    • After the award of his doctorate, in 1937, Fuchs was offered a lectureship in the Department of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh by Max Born.
    • In January 1938 Fuchs joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • In the summer of that year he attended the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium held in University Hall, St Andrews.
    • These requests were successful in December 1940 and Fuchs returned to Edinburgh.
    • Soon after his return to Edinburgh he received a request from Rudolf Peierls to go to Birmingham and work on the theoretical side of the British project to develop an atomic bomb.

  163. Craig biography
    • Craig was a pupil of David Gregory in Edinburgh.
    • He entered the University of Edinburgh in 1684 and graduated with an M.A.
    • However, during his time as an undergraduate in Edinburgh, he travelled down to Cambridge in 1685 where he published a mathematical text of which we give some details below.
    • While he was still a student in Edinburgh, Craig published Methodus figurarum lineis rectis et curvis comprehensarum quadraturas determinandi Ⓣ which contains Leibniz's dy/dx notation.

  164. Keast biography
    • John and Rose were Roman Catholics who married in 1940 in Broxburn, a town in West Lothian, Scotland, located about 20 km west of Edinburgh.
    • In October 1960, Keast began his studies at the University of Edinburgh taking courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry.
    • Mike Osborne, who came to Edinburgh in July 1963 as Assistant Director of the University Computer Unit, contributed some lectures on the numerical solution of differential equations to Fulton's honours course.
    • At Edinburgh University, Keast was in a class which contained a number of students who went on to academic careers including Colin Campbell, whose career was at the University of St Andrews, and Alistair Watson, whose career was at Dundee University.
    • Colin Campbell, who had been in the same class as Keast as an undergraduate at Edinburgh, had spent 1964-65 studying for a Master's degree at McGill in Canada before being appointed to St Andrews in 1965.

  165. Walker Arthur biography
    • Leaving Oxford, he then moved to Edinburgh to undertake research.
    • thesis to Edinburgh, Walker was examined by Eddington.
    • Walker was elected both a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and a fellow of the Royal Society of London.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh honoured Walker by awarding him their Keith Medal in 1950.

  166. Braikenridge biography
    • Braikenridge claimed to have discovered the theorem, and many other results, in 1726 when he was living in Edinburgh and that Maclaurin had learnt of them.
    • After a few days it happened that I visited Colin Maclaurin, Edinburgh Professor, who at that time was visiting London, who recalled his conversation with Craig who had described my theorems, and [Maclaurin] said moreover that he had discovered similar ones and he showed me manuscripts which he said contained his own discoveries; but I am ignorant of the method he used for he did not entrust the manuscript to my hands, nor was I allowed to glance over it.
    • [Braikenridge] taught mathematics here [in Edinburgh] privately for some years, and some time ago (viz.
    • Maclaurin did not dispute the fact that Braikenridge had published first; what did annoy him was the fact that he had been teaching courses at Edinburgh since 1725 which had contained these results yet he felt that Braikenridge was suggesting that he [Maclaurin] had not known of the results since he had not published them.
    • Braikenridge attacks even more vigorously Maclaurin's apparently innocent comment that Braikenridge taught mathematics in Edinburgh privately for some years:- .

  167. Sheppard biography
    • Sheppard spent some time in Edinburgh following his retirement and during this time he collaborated with Aitken.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1926 while living in Edinburgh and remained a member for the rest of his life.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1932, his proposers being Sir Edmund T Whittaker, George James Lidstone, Alexander C Aitken, William Ogilvy Kermack.
    • An obituary, written by A C Aitken and E T Whittaker, appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Volume 56 (1935-36), 279-82.

  168. Haldane biography
    • He then went to the University of Edinburgh where he studied divinity.
    • In 1819 Leslie, who had been the professor of mathematics at Edinburgh since 1805, resigned the chair when appointed to the more prestigious post of professor of natural philosophy.
    • Haldane applied for the Edinburgh Chair of Mathematics which was at that time considered the most prestigious mathematics chair in Scotland.
    • Earlier that year, on 24 January, he had been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  169. Wattie biography
    • from Oxford, Wattie taught at George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • In 1896 he became one of His Majesty's Inspectors in Edinburgh.
    • After three years in Edinburgh, he moved to Keith, in Banffshire.
    • Wattie joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1889 when he was teaching English at George Watson's College, Edinburgh.

  170. Craig James biography
    • James attended Daniel Stewart's College in Edinburgh, being dux of the school in 1885.
    • He then was an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh, where he was awarded an M.A., then went to Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he was a Wrangler in the Mathematical Tripos.
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 17 February 1908 having been proposed by George Chrystal, William J Macdonald, John Alison, and John Brown Clark.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  171. Aitchison biography
    • The family lived in East Linton, a small town about 35 km east of Edinburgh.
    • For his secondary education he attended Preston Lodge High School, in Prestonpans, a town on the Firth of Forth about half way between Edinburgh and East Lothian.
    • However, when he was in his final year, the headmaster, Andrew Millar, said to him "You'll be going to university, won't you?." Aitchison said later that being a shy boy he certainly was not going to argue with the headmaster, so he said "Yes", and applied to the University of Edinburgh.
    • This had little impact on his school career and, by the time he entered the University of Edinburgh in 1943, the war was still in progress.
    • In 1968 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  172. Goldie biography
    • At this time he returned to Scotland as Superintendent of the Edinburgh Office which was responsible for running three Meteorological and Magnetic Observatories at Aberdeen, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick.
    • Goldie was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in December 1926 while he was working in Edinburgh.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 9 March 1925, his proposers being Thomas James Jehu, Ralph Allan Sampson, Sir James Walker, Sir Ernest Maclagan Wedderburn.
    • An obituary, written by W A Harwood, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1965, pages 18-20.

  173. Muir biography
    • In 1871 Muir became an assistant at Glasgow University and it was shortly after this that he published his first paper with the Royal Society of Edinburgh who then elected him a fellow [election to a fellowship is rather different today!].
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 and in the following year Muir was elected as president.
    • He gave a presidential address, which was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society of 1884, entitled On the promotion of research.
    • Muir received several awards from the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  174. Butchart biography
    • Edinburgh 51 (1930-31), 200-201.','1]:- .
    • Raymond Butchart was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1914.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 1 February 1915, his proposers being William Peddie, Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Peter Comrie, Sir Ernest M Wedderburn.
    • An obituary, written by J E A Steggall, appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Volume 51 (1930-31), 200-201.

  175. Thom George biography
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 and Thom was one of the founder members, joining the Society at its first meeting in February of that year.
    • The University of St Andrews conferred an honour on Thom during his time as President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Principal of Dollar Institution, president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Another member of the Society, John Sturgeon Mackay, M.A., mathematical master Edinburgh Academy, was also offered an LL.D.
    • Thom left the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1902, the year in which he retired due to ill health.

  176. Birkhoff biography
    • Of local interest in St Andrews is the fact that Birkhoff was one of the main speakers at the 1926 St Andrews Colloquium and was elected an honorary member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1927.
    • He gave four lectures at the Gregory Tercentenary celebrations by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in July 1938 and was awarded an honorary LL.D.
    • He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Academie des Sciences in Paris, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, the Circolo Matematico di Palermo, the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, the Gottingen Academy, the Royal Institute of Bologna, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences of Lima, Peru.
    • 5.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1926 .

  177. Bell Robert biography
    • Bell was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in March 1899.
    • He served the Society as editor of the Proceedings from 1911 until he left Edinburgh to take up the Professorship at the University of Otago.
    • Robert John Tainsh Bell was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1916, his proposers being George Alexander Gibson, Andrew Gray, Robert Alexander Houstoun, Diarmid Noel Paton.
    • An obituary, written by R P Gillespie, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1966, pages 10-11.

  178. Graham Tommy biography
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Tommy Graham attended the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium held in St Andrews in 1934, 1938, 1951, 1955, 1959, 1964 and 1968.
    • He was elected President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, serving in 1952-53.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  179. Levi-Civita biography
    • He was also an honorary member of the London Mathematical Society, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He attended the 1930 Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in St Andrews.
    • 5.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1930 .

  180. Macintyre Archibald biography
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • A few years later, in 1952, the two Macintyres published a more conventional type of joint paper, namely the 2-author work Theorems on the convergence and asymptotic validity of Abel's series which was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Archibald Macintyre was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 March 1947.
    • Finally, let us record that Macintyre was a member of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, the London Mathematical Society and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  181. Bayes biography
    • We do know that in 1719 Bayes matriculated at the University of Edinburgh where he studied logic and theology.
    • Records which still survive at the University of Edinburgh record that he gave the homily on 14 January 1721 with the text being "Matthew Chapter 7 verses 24-27", and again on 20 January 1722 with the text being "Matthew Chapter 11 verses 29-30".
    • At some time Bayes must have studied mathematics but there is no evidence that he did so at Edinburgh University.
    • However, he certainly had the opportunity to study mathematics at Edinburgh and when he wrote at age 34:- .

  182. Metzler biography
    • In June 1918 Metzler joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and remained a member of the Society throughout his career.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 3 March 1902, his proposers being D H Marshall, R M Wenley, John George Adami, James Douglas Hamilton Dickson.
    • An obituary, written by A C Aitken, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, page 34.

  183. Sampson biography
    • In 1910 Sampson was appointed to a professorship at the University of Edinburgh and also as Astronomer Royal for Scotland.
    • We have mentioned several of these above, but let us also mention that he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 December 1911 being proposed by Sir Frank Watson Dyson, Sir James Walker, Arthur Robinson, and James Gordon MacGregor.
    • Sampson retired from his positions at Edinburgh University at age 71 in 1937 due to failing health.

  184. Ferrar biography
    • Bill was therefore delighted to accept Whittaker's invitation of a senior lectureship in Edinburgh where, in addition to Whittaker, his colleagues were Copson and Aitken.
    • It was perhaps in Edinburgh that the foundations were laid of his own high reputation as a lecturer.
    • In those days many Edinburgh undergraduates had little money to buy textbooks and so were very dependent on lectures.

  185. Clerke biography
    • Clerke began publishing in that year when her articles Brigandage in Sicily and Copernicus in Italy (both written during her time in Italy) appeared in the Edinburgh Review.
    • These were the first of 55 articles that she published in the Edinburgh Review.
    • The publishers of the Edinburgh Review were Adam and Charles Black of Edinburgh and at this time they were publishing the ninth edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica.

  186. Howie biography
    • He was Chairman of the Scottish Central Committee for Mathematics from 1975 to 1981, and served as President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society during 1973-74.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1971, served on its Council from 1992 to 1995 and was Curator of the Society 2006-2011.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh awarded Howie their Keith Prize for the papers he published in their Proceedings during the period 1979-81.
    • He also served as Editorial adviser for Proceedings A of the Royal Society of Edinburgh for two spells, namely during 1988-91, and again during 1997-2000.

  187. Thomson biography
    • This paper Fourier's expansions of functions in trigonometrical series was written to defend Fourier's mathematics against criticism from the professor of mathematics at the university of Edinburgh.
    • In addition to his activities with the Royal Society, as one would expect of such an eminent Scottish professor, he served the Royal Society of Edinburgh over many years.
    • 8.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1883 .

  188. Wishart biography
    • His mother was Elizabeth Wishart (born in Edinburgh about 1866).
    • He attended Perth Academy and then, in 1916, entered the University of Edinburgh.
    • Pearson had a project for Wishart to work on and, given that Whittaker had set up his mathematical laboratory in Edinburgh, it was clear why Whittaker's advice on a possible assistant had been sought.

  189. McQuistan biography
    • McQuistan was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in December 1908.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921, his proposers being Andrew Gray, George Alexander Gibson, James Gordon Gray, Robert Alexander Houstoun.
    • An obituary, written by R O Street, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, pages 23-24.

  190. Gray James biography
    • Gray was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in March 1909.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 18 January 1909, his proposers being Andrew Gray, William Jack, Cargill Gilston Knott, George Chrystal.
    • An obituary, written by Robert Alexander Houstoun, appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Volume 55 (1934-35), 154-155.

  191. Crawford biography
    • Crawford joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in April 1885 while he was still a student in Glasgow.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 January 1903, his proposers being Sir W Thomson (Lord Kelvin), Thomas Muir, George Chrystal, John Sturgeon Mackay.
    • An obituary, written by S Skewes, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1952, pages 14-15.

  192. Polkinghorne biography
    • During these last months he received an offer of a lectureship in theoretical physics in Edinburgh, Scotland, so on returning to the UK he went straight there to take up the post.
    • Polkinghorne particularly enjoyed teaching at Edinburgh and also began supervising research students, another part of being a university teacher that he found very satisfying.
    • While in Edinburgh his first child, Peter, was born in 1957.
    • After two years at Edinburgh he was invited to return to Cambridge as a lecturer.

  193. Scott Agnes biography
    • After five years at the school she then attended Boroughmuir Higher Grade School, Edinburgh, for seven years.
    • After having passed the Preliminary Examination, Scott first matriculated at Edinburgh University in October 1912.
    • Before graduating, Scott joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1917.
    • She gave her address as Argyle Cottage, Liberton, the same as she had given when she matriculated at Edinburgh University, and clearly her family address.

  194. Eddington biography
    • Eddington wrote (see for example [',' A V Douglas, The life of Arthur Stanley Eddington (Edinburgh-New York, 1956).','6]):- .
    • Eddington wrote, in a parody of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (see for example [',' A V Douglas, The life of Arthur Stanley Eddington (Edinburgh-New York, 1956).','6]):- .
    • In addition to election to the Royal Society, he was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Irish Academy, the National Academy of Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Prussian Academy of Sciences and many others.

  195. Simpson Mary biography
    • On first matriculation in the Faculty of Pure Science of Edinburgh University in October 1919 she gave her Religious Denomination as Episcopalian.
    • Joppa is very close to Portobello (they are on the coast and were the seaside resorts for Edinburgh), so it is reasonable to assume she lived there when she attended Portobello H.
    • In December 1923 she joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • She did not remain long in Edinburgh, for she was appointed by the University of St Andrews to a position in University College, Dundee in 1924.

  196. Timms biography
    • From February 1929, before taking up his position as an assistant in St Andrews, Timms joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1933, his proposers being Herbert Westren Turnbull, Edward Thomas Copson, Alexander Craig Aitken,Sir Edmund T Whittaker.
    • An obituary, written by W L Edge, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1984, page 213.

  197. Talbot biography
    • He visited Edinburgh in the early 1840s and published Sun Pictures of Scotland in 1845 which contains photographs of Scotland including the Scott Monument on Princes Street in Edinburgh.
    • He was awarded an honorary degree by Edinburgh University in 1863:- .

  198. Robb biography
    • Robb was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in February 1925.
    • He was also elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 4 March 1929, his proposers being Thomas Murray MacRobert, John McWhan, Donald Neil McArthur, William Arthur.
    • An obituary, written by Robert A Rankin, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1978, pages 52-53.

  199. Brown Walter biography
    • Brown joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1911.
    • Walter Brown was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1923, his proposers being Andrew Gray, George A Gibson, John Walter Gregory, James Gordon Gray, Dugald Black McQuistan.
    • An obituary, written anonymously, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1958, pages 14-15.

  200. Trail biography
    • The runners up, with 119 and 90 respectively, were Robert Hamilton, who joined the staff later and John Playfair, afterwards professor at Edinburgh.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh was founded in 1783 and Trail was a Founder Member, elected on 17 November 1783.

  201. Mitchell biography
    • There was also a group in Edinburgh, headed by Mike Osborne, who came to Edinburgh in 1964 as Assistant Director of the University Computer Unit.
    • After a seminar in St Andrews given by John Todd, and attended by some of the Edinburgh group, Ron and Mike exchanged ideas about the need for more interaction, and Mike Osborne suggested a conference.

  202. Peirce B O biography
    • While in Leipzig, he had met Isamella Turnbull Landreth who was a Scottish girl from Edinburgh who was studying music at the Conservatory in Leipzig.
    • Having now secured a permanent academic post, Peirce married Isamella Landreth in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 27 July 1882; they had two daughters.
    • by Edinburgh University in 1874, served at Logie-Pert from 1884 to 1934.

  203. Wittich biography
    • Wittich matriculated at Frankfurt an der Oder in 1576 and there he met John Craig, from Edinburgh, who was dean at Frankfurt an der Oder for several years before returning to Edinburgh.
    • In turn he took his annotated copy with him when he returned to Edinburgh, and he surely must have shown it to Napier who was living in a castle in the area.

  204. Macmillan biography
    • Macmillan was working at Clifton Bank School by 1887 for in that year he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society giving the School as his address.
    • Clearly the boys became excellent sportsmen as can be seen from many newspaper reports where Clifton Bank has triumphed at rugby or cricket over schools from Fife, Perth, Dundee, and Edinburgh.
    • As we noted above, Macmillan joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in March 1887 when the Society was in its sixth session, four years after it was founded.

  205. Slater biography
    • He graduated from the Academy in 1929 and began his university studies at the University of Edinburgh [',' D G Kendall, Noel Bryan Slater, Bull.
    • He clearly benefited by and often commented with satisfaction upon the breadth of his Edinburgh studies, and these were attended by marked success; he was elected both Arnott Scholar in Experimental Physics, and Maclaren and Ferguson Scholar in Mathematics, and he was a medallist in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.

  206. Bolam biography
    • His first post was at the Trinity Navigation School of Newcastle and from there he went to Leith, the port for the city of Edinburgh, where he taught at the Government Navigation School.
    • When James Bolam become a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1883 he was head of the Government Navigation School in Leith:- .
    • He was then made an honorary member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and, on retirement from the College, moved to St Helen's, Drumchapel, Dumbartonshire where he lived with his son.

  207. Born biography
    • After a short time in India, in 1936 he became Tait professor of applied mathematics at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
    • One of his research students described Born's days in Edinburgh:- .

  208. Arbuthnot biography
    • Certainly John did not take part in the military campaign and there is some evidence that he was in Edinburgh studying mathematics with David Gregory.
    • In 1690, because of the unrest in Scotland, David Gregory left Edinburgh and went to Oxford and Arbuthnot may have spent time in Oxford.
    • A detailed treaty was proposed in the summer of 1706 and Arbuthnot published a pamphlet A sermon preach'd to the people at the Mercat Cross of Edinburgh on the subject of the union which made clear that its author was a Scot who believed in the economic benefits of a union.

  209. Pack biography
    • 14 April 1920 - 3 December 2016, Royal Society of Edinburgh.','4]:- .
    • 14 April 1920 - 3 December 2016, Royal Society of Edinburgh.','4]:- .
    • He organised many of the Scottish events of the European Music Year 1985 in Scotland, in particular a concert given by Scottish schoolchildren in the Usher Hall, Edinburgh, on 21 June 1985.

  210. Eastwood biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 9 March 1925 having been proposed by Sir Edmund T Whittaker, David Gibb, Sir Charles Galton Darwin, and Edward Thomas Copson.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  211. Bjerknes Vilhelm biography
    • He organised the International Meeting of the Association in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1936.
    • He was elected to many national academies such as the Norwegian Academy of Oslo (1893), the Washington Academy of Science (1906), the Dutch Academy of Science (1923), the Prussian Academy (1928), the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1930), the Royal Society of London (1933), the U.S.

  212. Kuratowski biography
    • F.R.S.E., Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1980-81 (1982), 40-47.','15]:- .
    • The USSR Academy of Sciences, the Hungarian Academy, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Academy of the German Democratic Republic, the Academy of Sciences of Argentina, the Accademia dei Lincei, the Academy of Arts and Letters of Palermo, and the Royal Society of Edinburgh all elected him to membership.

  213. McArthur biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921 having been proposed by George Alexander Gibson, Andrew Gray, James Gordon Gray, and Robert Alexander Houstoun.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes ia at THIS LINK .

  214. Mikhlin biography
    • The book [',' S G Mikhlin, Multidimensional singular integrals and integral equations, International Series of Monographs in Pure and Applied Mathematics 83 (Pergamon Press, Oxford-London-Edinburgh-New York-Paris-Frankfurt, 1965).','1] is dedicated to her memory.
    • He could travel to countries of the Eastern European block and even was a member of the Soviet delegation at the 1958 International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, Scotland.
    • A complete collection of his results in this field up to 1965, as well as contributions by Francesco Tricomi, Georges Giraud, Alberto Calderon and Antoni Zygmund, is contained in the monograph [',' S G Mikhlin, Multidimensional singular integrals and integral equations, International Series of Monographs in Pure and Applied Mathematics 83 (Pergamon Press, Oxford-London-Edinburgh-New York-Paris-Frankfurt, 1965).','1].

  215. Burchnall biography
    • For twenty years he served on the board of governors of Barnard Castle School, latterly as chairman of the governors [',' Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1974-75 (1976), 30-33.','3]:- .
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 March 1953.

  216. Dougall Charles biography
    • His daughter Elizabeth, like her father, wrote poetry, and she married John Hogben, a former pupil, who became the proprietor of the Edinburgh Book Shop in George Street - a branch of Thin's - and they founded the Moray Press.
    • Dougall joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1897 when teaching at Whitehill School in Glasgow.
    • DOUGALL.- At "The Inclosure," Stirling, the residence of his sister, Mrs T B Ferguson, suddenly, on 2 January 1930, Charles Shirra Dougall, M.A., J.P., Rector Emeritus of Dollar Academy, and lately of 23 Cargil Terrace, Edinburgh, second son of the late Robert Dougall, Kippen.

  217. Wright biography
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1937 and was awarded their Makdougall-Brisbane Prize in 1952:- .
    • He served on the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh from 1948 to 1949 and again from 1953 to 1956.

  218. Cassels biography
    • He attended Neville's Cross Council School in Durham and from there he went to George Heriot's School in Edinburgh where he completed his schooling.
    • He then entered Edinburgh University, graduating with an M.A.

  219. Veblen biography
    • He was elected to the Danish Academy of Sciences, the Academy of Sciences (Paris), the Polish Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and a number of other national academies in, for example, Ireland, Italy, and Peru.
    • In addition to an honorary degree from Oxford, he received similar honours from the universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Hamburg, and Oslo.

  220. Speiser Andreas biography
    • After being examined on his thesis, Speiser went to Britain where he spent time in London but also visited Edinburgh in August 1909.
    • Speiser later explained that he had a thought which led to a new direction in his studies while he was in Edinburgh:- .
    • When I walked around Edinburgh in August 1909, I suddenly thought: Maybe it's really true that mathematics is the source of art.

  221. Russell Scott biography
    • In 1825, he moved to Edinburgh, where he taught mathematics at a 'South Academy', perhaps founded by himself and a friend.
    • During 1832-33, following the death of John Leslie, he substituted for the professor of natural philosophy at Edinburgh University; but he did not apply for the vacant post, which he was sure would go to David Brewster.
    • He spoke of his work at early meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, founded in 1831; and the Association appointed him and Sir John Robison of Edinburgh to a 'Committee on Waves' to conduct observations and experiments.

  222. Fichera biography
    • He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences of Italy (the "Academy of Forty"), the Academy of Sciences of Turin, the Academy of Palermo, the Academy of Bologna, the Lombardo Institute, the Peloritana Academy, the Zelantea Academy, the Academy of Modena, the Gioenia Academy, the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Academia Europaea, the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Georgian Academy of Sciences.
    • In fact he was elected to an honorary fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1976.

  223. Humbert Pierre biography
    • After studying in Paris for three years he left for Scotland to undertake research at the University of Edinburgh.
    • At the University of Edinburgh Humbert undertook research under Whittaker whose philosophy of mathematics, and of science more generally, fitted in precisely with those of Humbert.
    • His whole career would be influenced by the one year, 1913-14, which he spent in Edinburgh and in many of his publications Whittaker's influence can be seen.

  224. Miller John biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 21 February 1910 having been proposed by George A Gibson, Magnus Maclean, Andrew Gray, and William Jack.
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  225. Cassels James biography
    • After having passed the University of Edinburgh Preliminary Examination he first matriculated at the university in October 1910.
    • At Edinburgh University Cassels studied Ordinary Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Chemistry in session 1910-11; Ordinary Logic, Intermediate Honours Mathematics and Experimental Physics in 1911-12; Intermediate Honours Mathematics, and Natural Philosophy (Dynamics and Thermodynamics), Advanced Mathematics, and Experimental Physics in session 1912-13; Honours Advanced Mathematics, Function Theory, Electrostatics, Dynamics (Advanced), and Experimental Physics (Advanced) in session 1913-14.
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in January 1927.

  226. Arthur biography
    • Arthur was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in January 1920.
    • William Arthur was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1921, his proposers being George Alexander Gibson, Andrew Gray, James Gordon Gray, Robert Alexander Houstoun.
    • An obituary, written by D Martin, appears in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1980, pages 32-33.

  227. Halmos biography
    • Halmos spent part of his 1973 sabbatical leave in Edinburgh and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  228. Oppenheim biography
    • Following the award of his doctorate, Oppenheim was appointed as a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1956, nominated by Edmund Whittaker, Alex Aitken, Edward Copson and Robert Rankin.

  229. Cayley biography
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1865.
    • He received honorary degrees from the universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Edinburgh, Dublin, Gottingen, Heidelberg, Leyden and Bologna.

  230. Frechet biography
    • He was elected to the Polish Academy of Sciences in 1929 and the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1947.
    • 3.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1938 .

  231. Brink biography
    • Brink spent the academic year 1919-20 at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland where he was appointed as a lecturer in Mathematics.
    • This led to him joining the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1919.

  232. Penney biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1970.

  233. Menshov biography
    • In 1958 Menshov attended the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh and he was invited to address the Congress with his paper On the convergence of trigonometric series.
    • The first of the two pictures of Menshov which we have given was taken while he was at the Congress in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1958.

  234. Sneddon biography
    • He received many honours for his work, notably election to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1958 and to the Royal Society of London in 1983.

  235. Roth Klaus biography
    • Davenport presented Roth with the Fields Medal at the International Congress in Edinburgh in 1958.
    • He received many other honours including fellowship of the Royal Society of London in 1960 and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1993.

  236. Babbage biography
    • However in 1820 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and in the same year he was a major influence in founding the Royal Astronomical Society.

  237. Pearson biography
    • He was also elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  238. Airy biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1835, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1836, having received the Society's Copley Medal in 1831.

  239. Salmon biography
    • Salmon was awarded honorary degrees at Oxford (1868), Cambridge (1874), Edinburgh (1884) and University of Christiana (Oslo) (1902).

  240. Boys biography
    • The University of Edinburgh awarded Boys an honorary degree in 1932.

  241. Coulson biography
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1941 and to the Royal Society of London in 1950.

  242. Adams biography
    • He did, however, accept honorary degrees from Oxford, Dublin, Edinburgh, and Bologna.

  243. Arago biography
    • We described above the adventures he had in taking readings in the south, but later, in 1821, the two extended their results to the north making measurements of the force of gravity using a pendulum in Scotland at Leith, near Edinburgh, and in the Shetland Islands.

  244. Munn biography
    • Douglas did his duty as a committee man, serving for four years on the Council of the London Mathematical Society and for a short period on the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and taking his turn as President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1984-85).

  245. Adamson biography
    • It is perhaps a hard-headed rather than an exciting presentation, but the author, an ardent Scotsman writing in the Edinburgh series, would presumably wish to have it that way.
    • He was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and was honoured by being elected President of the Society in 1983-84.

  246. Morgan William biography
    • Andrew Press, Edinburgh, (1992)','29] and [',' D O Forfar, History of the Development of the Actuarial Profession and of Actuarial Thought in Scotland, 26th ','32].
    • Clark, Edinburgh (1914).

  247. Simson biography
    • The work ran through more than 70 different editions, revisions or translations published first in Glasgow in 1756, with others appearing in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dublin, London, Cambridge, Paris and a number of other European and American cities.
    • Several of his pupils achieved distinction in mathematics, notably Maclaurin, Stewart, John Robison who became Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh and Trail.

  248. Shimura biography
    • He attended the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, Scotland, in August 1958, during the months of the Paris trip, as an official Japanese delegate and presented his paper Fonctions automorphes et correspondances modulaires.
    • This last investigation formed the topic of his lecture at the International Congress in Edinburgh.

  249. Hill biography
    • He was also elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1908, the Royal Belgium Academy of Science (1909), the Norwegian Academy of Science (1910), the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (1913), and the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome (1913).

  250. Smith John biography
    • John Smith was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • His obituary written by R P Gillespie, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society at THIS LINK.

  251. Offord biography
    • On 4 March 1946 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  252. Nassau biography
    • In 1918 he went to the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and after spending some time there moved back to the University of Syracuse where he submitted his thesis Some Theorems in Alternants for which he was awarded a Ph.D.
    • He had already joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1919.

  253. Troughton biography
    • He was also elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1822.

  254. Hutton biography
    • He later received an honorary degree from the University of Edinburgh.

  255. Lloyd Humphrey biography
    • Hamilton's theoretical approach was described by Lloyd in his 'Report on the progress and present state of physical optics' which he made to the British Association for the Advancement of Science at its meeting in Edinburgh in 1834.
    • In 1845 he was elected as an honorary member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and in the following year he was elected President of the Royal Irish Academy, a position he held until 1851.

  256. Dirac biography
    • The list of these is long but among them are USSR Academy of Sciences (1931), Indian Academy of Sciences (1939), Chinese Physical Society (1943), Royal Irish Academy (1944), Royal Society of Edinburgh (1946), Institut de France (1946), National Institute of Sciences of India (1947), American Physical Society (1948), National Academy of Sciences (1949), National Academy of Arts and Sciences (1950), Accademia delle Scienze di Torino (1951), Academia das Ciencias de Lisboa (1953), Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Vatican City (1958), Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Rome (1960), Royal Danish Academy of Sciences (1962), and Academie des Sciences Paris (1963).

  257. De Morgan biography
    • When I send a bit of investigation to Edinburgh, the W.
    • He also refused an honorary degree from the University of Edinburgh.

  258. Spottiswoode biography
    • We should also mention his election to the Academy of Sciences in Paris and the award of honorary degrees by the universities of Cambridge, Dublin, Edinburgh, and Oxford.

  259. Brouwer biography
    • 2.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1954 .

  260. Macbeath biography
    • Among the honours that Macbeath received, we note that he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 7 March 1955.

  261. Carre biography
    • Carre [',' D Brewster (ed.), Louis Carre, in The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia 5 (2) (William Blackwood, Edinburgh, 1830), 545-546.','1]:- .

  262. Schrodinger biography
    • In 1936 Schrodinger was offered the chair of physics at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
    • Born was then offered the Edinburgh post which he quickly accepted.

  263. Volterra biography
    • In December 1938 he was affected by phlebitis: the use of his limbs was never recovered, but his intellectual energy was unaffected, and it was after this that his two last papers 'The general equations of biological strife in the case of historical actions' and 'Energia nei fenomeni elastici ereditarii' were published by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the Pontifical Academy of Sciences respectively.

  264. Ringrose biography
    • The Royal Society of London elected Ringrose as a fellow in 1977 and he has also been elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  265. Oleinik biography
    • She was elected to: the Russian Academy of Sciences; the Academia Nazionale dei Lincei in Italy; the Sachsische Akademie of Sciences in Germany; the Italian Academy of Sciences in Palermo; the Italian Academy of Sciences in Milan; and the Royal Society of Edinburgh in Scotland.

  266. Wilson Bertram biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 5 March 1934 having been proposed by Sir Edmund T Whittaker, James H Ashworth, Nicholas M H Lightfoot, Edward Thomas Copson.
    • His obituary written by U S Haslam-Jones, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and is at THIS LINK.

  267. Muirhead biography
    • Robert Muirhead was an active member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • An obituary, written by John Dougall, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  268. Blackburn biography
    • From 1831 until 1836 Blackburn attended the Edinburgh Academy then continued his education at Eton.

  269. Taylor James biography
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in February 1883 and Taylor was present at the first meeting, becoming a founder member.
    • Somewhat confusingly another James Taylor, who was a Mathematical Master at Edinburgh Academy, joined the Society in November 1886 so for around 12 years the Society had the rather confusing situation of having two members with precisely the same name (neither appears to have had a middle name).

  270. Steggall biography
    • He was an enthusiastic member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society which, by coincidence, was founded in the year that Steggall arrived in Scotland to take up his professorship in Dundee.

  271. Stuart biography
    • James Stuart's father was Joseph Gordon Stuart (born in Edinburgh about 1816) who owned a Flax Spinning Mill in Milton of Balgonie in Fife.
    • James' mother was Catherine Booth (born in Edinburgh about 1816).

  272. Green Sandy biography
    • While mentioning the honours given to Green, we should record that he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1968, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1987.
    • As another little personal note, let me [EFR] say how delighted I was to be congratulated by Sandy when I myself was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1997.

  273. Kruskal Martin biography
    • In 1997 Kruskal was elected to the Royal Society of London, in 2000 he received an honorary doctorate from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, and in 2001 he was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  274. Brown Gavin biography
    • in 1966 for his thesis Norm and stability properties of semi-algebras and in the same year he worked as a Junior Research Fellow at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He was honoured by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for his outstanding mathematical work in 1977 when they awarded him their Sir Edmund Whittaker Memorial Prize.

  275. Chree biography
    • His first paper On certain forms of vibration was presented to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in session 1885-86.
    • We mentioned above Chree's association with the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  276. MacLane biography
    • Among his other honours we note that he was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1972.

  277. Milne-Thomson biography
    • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 6 March 1933.

  278. Nash-Williams biography
    • This survey was based on lectures which Nash-Williams gave at the Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium held in St Andrews in 1980.

  279. Picken biography
    • His mother was Margaret Picken (born in Edinburgh about 1847).
    • Picken was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in May 1903 and remaining a member during his career in New Zealand and Australia.

  280. Sommerville biography
    • Edinburgh Math.

  281. Haughton biography
    • Another aspect of Haughton's work which we choose neither to describe as a positive contribution nor as a negative one is his paper On Hanging considered from a Mechanical and Physiological point of view which was published in the London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine in 1866.
    • Haughton received many honours including election to the Royal Irish Academy (1845), election to the Royal Society of London (1858), and honorary degrees from the University of Oxford in 1868, the University of Cambridge in 1880, the University of Edinburgh in 1884, and the University of Bologna in 1888.

  282. Murray biography
    • These include election as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1979), as a Fellow of the Royal Society of London (1985).
    • He was made an Honorary Member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 2008, received the Royal Society's Bakerian Medal and Prize Lecture (2009), Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, Gold Medal (2009), European Academy of Sciences' Leonardo da Vinci Medal (2011), and the William Benter Prize in Applied Mathematic (2012).

  283. Atkinson biography
    • Atkinson received many honours for his contributions including election to fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada (1967), election to fellowship in the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1975), and the McDougall- Brisbane Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh for 1974-76 for his paper Limit-n criteria of integral type (1974).

  284. Graves John biography
    • Hamilton, however, strongly supported Graves' results and when he spoke at the 1834 meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Edinburgh, he offered another proof of the results.
    • He was unsuccessful and wrote a letter to James David Forbes (1809-1868), who was at that time professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh.

  285. Watson biography
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh elected him to an honorary fellowship.

  286. Sobolev biography
    • In 1958 Sobolev was part of the Soviet delegation to the International Mathematical Union, the delegation being led by Vinogradov, and Sobolev attended the International Congress at Edinburgh that year and gave an invited address on partial differential equations.

  287. Glaisher biography
    • He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the National Academy of Sciences in the United States, and was awarded an honorary degree by Victoria University Manchester (1902) and the University of Dublin on the occasion of their tercentenary.

  288. Bowditch biography
    • He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1809, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Royal Society of London both in 1818, and the Royal Irish Academy in 1819.

  289. Young Thomas biography
    • Young continued his medical training, entering the University of Edinburgh in 1794.
    • He did not find this hard for he had been moving steadily away from the strict Quaker rules, attending dances and the theatre while in Edinburgh.

  290. Pinkerton biography
    • An obituary of Peter Pinkerton, written by John Dougall, was published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society at THIS LINK.

  291. Weber biography
    • He was elected an honorary fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 2 March 1874.

  292. Valiant biography
    • Valiant moved to Scotland in 1975 to take up a lectureship at the University of Edinburgh.
    • In Edinburgh he was promoted to reader in 1981 but went to the United States in 1982 when he was a visiting professor at Harvard.

  293. Green biography
    • Sir Edward Bromhead was one of the subscribers to the Essay and he had written immediately to Green offering to send any further papers to the Royal Society of London, the Royal Society of Edinburgh or the Cambridge Philosophical Society.
    • The third was on hydrodynamics and this work was published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh (of which Bromhead was a Fellow) in 1836.

  294. Baker biography
    • 6.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1926 .

  295. Listing biography
    • Among the honours which Listing did receive were election to the Gottingen Academy and the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  296. Vinogradov biography
    • He then went on to the International Congress at Edinburgh.
    • at St Andrews, which was held just before the International Congress of Mathematicians at Edinburgh in 1958.

  297. Pincherle biography
    • He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences of Italy (the "Academy of Forty"), the Reale Accademia delle Scienze of the Institute of Bologna, the Reale Accademia delle Scienze of the Institute of Turin, the Reale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere, the Reale Istituto Veneto, the Accademia Pontaniana of Naples, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Bavarian Academy of Sciences, the Academy of Science of Coimbra, the Helvetic Society of Sciences, and made an honorary member of the Moscow Mathematical Society and the Calcutta Mathematical Society.

  298. Peirce Benjamin biography

  299. Piaggio biography
    • Piaggio was a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining the Society in May 1912.

  300. Ladyzhenskaya biography
    • Olga had not been allowed to travel outside Eastern Europe, apart from in 1958 when she attended the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, and not again until 30 years later in 1988.

  301. Hall biography
    • In 1955 he was one of the main speakers at the Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium in St Andrews where he gave five lectures on Symmetric Functions in the Theory of Groups.

  302. Vagner biography
    • Certainly Tamm was a good person to talk to - he was educated at the University of Edinburgh, then moved to the Moscow University, graduating in 1918.

  303. Cartwright biography

  304. Darboux biography

  305. Airey biography
    • Airey joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in November 1913 when he was the Principal of The Technical Institute, West Ham, London.

  306. Adams Edwin biography
    • In November of the same year he became a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, remaining in the Society through his career.

  307. Poisson biography

  308. Freundlich biography

  309. Cauchy biography

  310. Larmor biography

  311. Diaconis biography
    • Between these two Congresses, he was a main speaker at the Edinburgh Mathematical Society's St Andrews Colloquium in 1996, and the American Mathematical Society's Gibbs lecturer in 1997.

  312. Collingwood biography

  313. Ribenboim biography
    • In the same year he attended the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, being the second such congress he had attended.

  314. Glenie biography

  315. Cantor Moritz biography
    • Edinburgh Math.

  316. Darwin biography

  317. De Prony biography

  318. Delambre biography

  319. Thom biography
    • Hopf, who awarded the Fields Medal to Thom in Edinburgh, pointed in his presentation address to the importance of Thom's theory:- .

  320. Plana biography

  321. Niven Charles biography
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 and at the meeting in June of that year Niven was elected as an honorary member.

  322. Boltzmann biography

  323. Hardy biography

  324. Walsh biography
    • His posthumous papers show that he was thus in frequent correspondence with the French Academy, the Royal Society of London and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Irish Academy and other similar bodies.

  325. Steele biography
    • She joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in June 1925.

  326. Kerr biography
    • During this period he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, becoming a member in April 1884 after attending Muir's lecture on The Promotion of Research with Special Reference to the Present State of the Scottish Universities and Secondary Schools in the previous month.

  327. Tucker Robert biography
    • He wrote over 40 research papers which were published in leading journals such as 17 papers in the Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society, 9 papers in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, 10 papers in the Messenger of Mathematics, and 4 papers in the Quarterly Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics.

  328. Fisher biography
    • In the event Fisher withdrew the paper and submitted it to the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh where it was accepted.

  329. Gauss biography

  330. Lamb biography

  331. Rennie biography
    • Chris Smyth (University of Edinburgh) was on the staff at James Cook University from 1977 to 1984 and now hosts a web site with copies of all of these Notes (see www.maths.ed.ac.uk/cook/).

  332. Ramsden biography

  333. Legendre biography

  334. Le Verrier biography

  335. Franklin Benjamin biography

  336. Orr biography
    • Timoney, known as Dick, worked with Edmund Whittaker in Edinburgh before returning to University College Dublin in 1932 where he became a colleague of Orr.

  337. Semple biography
    • After winning the Rayleigh Prize in 1929, Semple was appointed to a lecturing post at the University of Edinburgh.

  338. Grauert biography
    • He was invited to give a 30 minute address to the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh in 1958, and a one hour address to the International Congress of Mathematicians in Stockholm in 1962.

  339. Wu Wen-Tsun biography
    • He was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1958 but was unable to attend.

  340. Herschel William biography
    • He performed in a number of cities including Edinburgh and Newcastle-upon-Tyne but around this time he began to study languages and the theory of music.

  341. Jacobson biography
    • I was invited to give a course of lectures at the St Andrews Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  342. Mazya biography
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2001), and the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2002).

  343. DArcy biography
    • We quote from [',' Patrick d’Arcy, in David Brewster (ed.), The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia 2 (J and E Parker, 1832), 316-318.','7] regarding d'Arcy's appearance and character:- .

  344. Rhodes biography
    • In fact the British Association for the Advancement of Science had met in Edinburgh in 1871 and set up a Mathematical Tables Committee.

  345. Feller biography
    • Feller delivered the one hour plenary talk Some new connections between probability and classical analysis at the International Congress of Mathematicians held in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1958.

  346. Cardan biography
    • He arrived in Edinburgh on 29 June and saw the Archbishop immediately.

  347. Francoeur biography
    • He was elected to the many other Academies including St Petersburg, Lisbon, Edinburgh, Rouen, Lyon, Cambra, and Toulouse.

  348. Stieltjes biography
    • In May 1884 Hermite attended celebrations at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland to celebrate the three hundredth aniversary of the founding of the university.

  349. Bohr Niels biography

  350. Dupin biography

  351. Lions biography
    • He has been awarded an honorary doctorate from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland.

  352. Brashman biography
    • This was intended as a refutation of William Hamilton's essay On the study of mathematics as an exercise for the mind published in the Edinburgh Review in 1836, in which Hamilton claims not only that mathematics is useless in developing mental facilities but he even claims that it is pernicious.

  353. Yano biography
    • Being in the UK it was easy for him to attend the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh which was held in that year.

  354. Vilant biography

  355. Bessel biography

  356. Mocnik biography
    • In July 1830 there had been a revolution in Paris and the French royal family, who were members of the Bourbon dynasty, had fled from Paris and, after living first in Edinburgh, then in Prague, had moved to Gorizia in 1835.

  357. Bogolyubov biography
    • The International Congress of Mathematicians was held in Edinburgh in 1958 and Bogolyubov (jointly with Vasilii Vladimirov) gave one of the plenary addresses On some mathematical problems of quantum field theory.

  358. Beale biography
    • Beale received a number of honours for her contributions including being invited to give evidence before the royal commission on secondary education (the Bryce commission) in 1894, being given the freedom of the borough of Cheltenham on 21 October 1901, and awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Edinburgh on 11 April 1902.

  359. Ball Robert biography

  360. Bers biography
    • In 1958 Bers address the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he lectured on Spaces of Riemann surfaces and announced a new proof of the measurable Riemann mapping theorem.

  361. Greenhill biography
    • 6.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1908 .

  362. Taylor Geoffrey biography

  363. Milne William biography
    • Milne joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1910.

  364. DOcagne biography
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held a Colloquium in 1914 following a highly successful colloquium in the previous year.

  365. Mytropolsky biography
    • He was a speaker at the International Congress for Mathematicians in Edinburgh in 1958, in Stockholm in 1962, in Moscow in 1966, in Nice in 1970, in Vancouver in 1974, in Warsaw in 1983, in Berkeley in 1986, and in Kyoto in 1990.

  366. Penrose biography
    • Oliver went on to become professor of mathematics first at the Open University, then at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland.

  367. Philip biography
    • Philip joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1885, two years after the Society was founded.

  368. Bisacre biography
    • In December 1925 Bisacre joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society giving his address as c/o Messrs Blackie & Co., 17 Stanhope Street, Glasgow.

  369. De Groot biography
    • These play a role in Automorphism groups of rings which was the topic of his address to the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1958.

  370. Chapman biography

  371. Hadamard biography

  372. Feuerbach biography
    • Edinburgh Math.

  373. Jacobi biography

  374. Ayyangar biography
    • Ayyangar joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in November 1923.

  375. Pedoe biography
    • By this time World War II had begun and his next paper Some properties of the paraboloid z = x2 + y2 (1939) had been published in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes.

  376. MacColl biography
    • Merridew's English Library and its club-like Reading and Conversation Rooms fully equipped with Britain's major newspapers and reviews, like the 'Westminster' or the 'Edinburgh Review', was a well known institution of Boulogne's cultural life.

  377. Martin biography
    • He was also a member of the London Mathematical Society, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the French Mathematical Society, the German Mathematical Society, and the Mathematical Circle of Palermo.

  378. Smith biography

  379. Aiyar biography
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1895 when he was a Probationary Deputy Collector in Trichinopoly, India.

  380. Jerrard biography
    • He wrote in [',' J Cockle, Concluding remarks on a recent mathematical controversy, London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine (4) 26 (1863), 223-224.','4]:- .

  381. Nijenhuis biography
    • During his time at the University of Washington, he was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland in August 1958.

  382. Horn biography
    • Denbigh was at that time Professor of Chemical Technology at Edinburgh University and Heriot-Watt University in Scotland.

  383. Cantor biography

  384. Orlicz biography
    • Orlicz participated in congresses of mathematics in Oslo (1936), Edinburgh (1958), Stockholm (1962) and Warsaw (1983), and in many scientific conferences.

  385. Carslaw biography

  386. Ostrowski biography
    • After being awarded a Rockefeller Research Fellowship, Ostrowski spent the academic year 1925-26 in Britain, spending periods at each of the universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Edinburgh.

  387. Liouville biography

  388. Sylvester biography

  389. Pisier biography
    • The first was at the meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1995, when he gave the lecture Operator spaces and group representations, and the second was in 2004 at Belfast University when he spoke on Factorization of completely bounded maps on "exact" C*-algebras and operator spaces.

  390. See biography
    • In December 1916 See joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, giving his address as Professor of the U.S.

  391. De Valera biography
    • Max Born and Albert Einstein were also mentioned; however, both had recently accepted positions - Born at Edinburgh and Einstein at Princeton.

  392. Abellanas biography
    • He also attended the International Congress of Mathematicians held at Edinburgh, Scotland, in August 1958.

  393. Rogosinski biography
    • Rogosinski lectured to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in the summer of 1945 and, a consequence of this lecture became the book Volume and integral (1952) published in the Oliver and Boyd Series of University Mathematical Texts.

  394. Einstein biography

  395. Bonnycastle biography
    • Bonnycastle was passionately fond of quoting Shakespeare, and telling stories; and if the Edinburgh Review had just come out, would give us all the jokes in it.

  396. Whitehead biography
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh awarded him their James Scott Prize in 1922 (he was the first recipient).

  397. Strong biography
    • He advocated the Continental approach to the calculus in his article Fluxions which appeared in Encyclopaedia Britannica in 1810 and in his article Fluxions for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia which was published in 1815 he used Leibniz's differential notation.

  398. Laplace biography

  399. Erlang biography
    • Originally published in Danish in 1910, an expanded version describing these new principles was published in English as How to reduce to a minimum the mean error of tables which he contributed to the Napier Tercentenary Memorial Volume published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1915.

  400. Hermite biography

  401. Cremona biography

  402. Kummer biography

  403. Faraday biography

  404. Maskelyne biography

  405. FitzGerald biography

  406. McConnell biography
    • This paper, published in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, was entitled Whittaker's correlation of physics and philosophy.

  407. Schiffer biography
    • Schiffer was invited at give a plenary lecture at the International Congress of Mathematicians held in Edinburgh, Scotland, in August 1958.

  408. Stokes biography

  409. Richardson Archibald biography
    • His obituary in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes is at THIS LINK .

  410. Wright Sewall biography
    • During this time he held two visiting professorships; he was Hitchcock Professor at the University of California Berkeley during 1943 and Fulbright Professor at the University of Edinburgh during session 1949-1950.

  411. Wilton biography
    • He joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1928.

  412. Lagrange biography

  413. Planck biography

  414. Broadbent biography
    • She had been brought up in Edinburgh, Scotland.

  415. Hamilton biography

  416. Biot biography

  417. Richmond biography
    • 3.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1930 .

  418. Whewell biography

  419. Shanks biography
    • He was influenced to undertake this task by William Rutherford from Edinburgh.

  420. Boas biography
    • In the Easter vacation Ralph visited my native city of Edinburgh for a few days, and I was able to show him some of the local sights.

  421. Hendricks biography
    • John Hamilton Moore (1738-1807), born in Edinburgh, Scotland and educated in Ireland, had established a Nautical Academy in Brentford, Middlesex, England in 1770 and published his Practical Navigator two years later.

  422. Lorentz biography

  423. Clausius biography

  424. Newcomb biography

  425. Black biography

  426. Jeffreys biography

  427. Poincare biography

  428. Burton biography
    • Marcus Levy (born about 1862) became a picture frame maker and dealer in paintings in Edinburgh.

  429. Picard Emile biography

  430. Cherry biography
    • Cherry also spent one term teaching at the University of Edinburgh in 1927 substituting for Charles Galton Darwin (son of George Howard Darwin).

  431. Helmholtz biography

  432. Warschawski biography
    • Ostrowski had taken up the position in Gottingen in 1923 but when Warschawski began his studies in 1926 he had just returned from a year of study in Britain at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Edinburgh.

  433. Nagata biography
    • In fact Nagata announced his negative solution to Hilbert's 14th problem in his invited lecture On the fourteenth problem of Hilbert at the International Congress of Mathematicians held in Edinburgh, Scotland, in August 1958.

  434. Coxeter biography
    • 3.nHonorary Fellow of the Edinburgh Maths Societyn1959 .

  435. Bradistilov biography
    • Bradistilov participated in many international conferences, in particular meetings which took place in Dresden, Edinburgh, Moscow, Kiev, Warsaw, Berlin, Milan, Budapest, Munich, lmenau, and Athens.

  436. Harary biography
    • I [EFR] first met Harary in 1972 when he was one of the plenary speakers at the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews.

  437. Kirchhoff biography

  438. Hirzebruch biography
    • He was elected to the the Orden pour le merite fur Wissenschaft und Kunste, the German Academy of Scientists Leopoldina, the Heidelberg Academy, the Mainz Academy, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences, the Nordrheinwestfalen Academy, the National Academy of Sciences (United States), the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Paris Academy of Sciences, the Gottingen Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, the Sachsische Akademie, the Berlin Academy of Science, the Royal Society of London, the Royal Irish Academy, the Polish Academy of Sciences, Academia Europaea, the European Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  439. Enriques biography

  440. Herschel biography

  441. Jackson Frank biography
    • He had, however, already published his first mathematical paper with Theorems in the products of related quantities appearing in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1895.

  442. Forsyth biography

  443. Rayleigh biography

  444. Quetelet biography

  445. Lexell biography


History Topics

  1. EMS History
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society 1883-1933 .
    • It is about 7.45 pm on Monday 12 March 1883 and we are passing the Mathematics Class Room of the University of Edinburgh.
    • We have stumbled across the first ordinary meeting of the newly formed Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • After being an assistant to James Clerk Maxwell at the Cavendish Laboratory he was Regius Professor of Mathematics at St Andrews 1877-1879, then Professor at Edinburgh.
    • The men Chrystal is addressing are mainly mathematics masters from Edinburgh schools.
    • Among them we recognise Andrew Barclay and Alexander Fraser, both Mathematical Masters at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, and Thomas Muir, Mathematical Master at the High School, Glasgow.
    • We recognise a few university men: Robert Allardice, Chrystal's assistant; Peter Guthrie Tait the Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh; and Cargill Knott, Tait's assistant, who is carefully taking notes and is clearly the Secretary.
    • So pressing does this appear to me to be that for several winters back - more particularly this winter - I have been thinking of trying to start something in Edinburgh in the nature of a mathematical seminary.
    • We are told of a circular issued by Cargill Knott, Andrew Barclay and Alexander Fraser, addressed 'to gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge and throughout Scotland generally whom deem likely to take an interest in such a Society'.
    • It is suggested that the Society be formed, in the first instance, of all those who shall give in their names on or before February 2, 1883, and who are (1) present or former students in either of the Advanced Mathematical Classes of Edinburgh University, (2) Honours Graduates in any of the British Universities, or (3) recognised Teachers of Mathematics; and that, after the above mentioned date, members be nominated and elected by ballot in the usual manner.
    • About 25 were Mathematics masters, a couple were Rectors such as George Thom at the Dollar Institution, then there was James Bolam, a self-taught mathematician from the Government Navigation School in Leith, Robert Omond who headed at The Observatory, Ben Nevis, a number of Edinburgh undergraduates, a few Ministers of religion, and a few university teachers of mathematics and natural philosophy.
    • Up to 1860 an undergraduate in a Scottish university (St Andrews (founded 1411), Glasgow (1450), Aberdeen (1494), and Edinburgh (1582)) studied for an M.A., essentially a set course consisting of English, Latin, Greek, Mental Philosophy, Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.
    • Edinburgh Staff 1883 .
    • A mathematical society aimed primarily at university staff would make no sense - only 8 university based mathematicians in 4 Scottish universities and travel from St Andrews and Aberdeen to Edinburgh was hard.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded to fill this gap - to provide the means for further study of mathematics.
    • Muir understood precisely what was wrong with the Scottish system, and how the Edinburgh Mathematical Society might help.
    • I assert with confidence - for I believe that those with more experience than myself will endorse what I say - that there is not a single member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society but might do useful work in the cause of mathematical research.
    • The fourth president of the Society was Robert McNair Ferguson, the Headmaster of the Institution, Edinburgh.
    • On Friday 12 November 1886 the Edinburgh Mathematical Society began its fifth session.
    • However, he decided that he would make teaching his career and in 1866 he was appointed as a Mathematics Master at the Edinburgh Academy; he held this post until he retired in 1904.
    • Mackay was unmarried, lived at 69 Northumberland Street, Edinburgh, where he died at the age of 70.
    • He was appointed Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh in 1912 following the death of George Chrystal in November of the previous year.
    • After six years as Royal Astronomer of Ireland (1906-12), he was appointed to the chair at Edinburgh.
    • Soon after he arrived in Edinburgh, Whittaker set up the Edinburgh Mathematical Laboratory to give a practical side to his interest in numerical analysis.
    • His influence on the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was rapid, for in 1913 they ran the first mathematical colloquium to he held in the UK.
    • The Mathematical colloquium organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society this year for the first time, began its meetings yesterday in the rooms of the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.
    • The idea of holding such a colloquium was an outcome of Professor Whittaker's announcement that he purposed organising, as part of the Mathematical Honours curriculum in the University of Edinburgh, a mathematical laboratory for systematic numerical discussion of functions and methods of calculation.
    • A Course of Five Lectures and Demonstrations by E T Whittaker, Esq., Sc.D., F.R.S., Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, on Practical Harmonic Analysis and Periodogram Analysis; an Illustration of Mathematical Laboratory Practice.
    • (Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh), on The Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equations in the Mathematical Laboratory.
    • Edinburgh Staff 1928 .
    • The schoolteachers, who continued to join the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, had a vigorous supporter within the Society.
    • In 1927 MacRobert proposed expanding this into the Journal of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society which would publish articles of pedagogic interest, historical articles, etc.
    • The next EMS Committee meeting took place on 1 May 1931 in Edinburgh.
    • Inglis did not attend the December meeting, so Etherington (the Secretary and a Lecturer at Edinburgh) wrote to him, informing him that the President, Mr Lawson, has arranged that Dr Mackie of Leith Academy would open a discussion on the teaching of mathematics in February.

  2. Maxwell's House
    • On a grey November day we [JOC and EFR] made the 50 mile train journey from St Andrews to Edinburgh to visit James Clerk Maxwell's house.
    • The house where James Clerk Maxwell was born is at 14 India Street, Edinburgh about a fifteen minute walk from the railway station which is in the centre of Edinburgh.
    • James Clerk Maxwell was born on 13th June 1831 in Edinburgh at 14 India Street, a house built for his father in that part of Edinburgh's elegant Georgian New Town which was built after the Napoleonic Wars.
    • Although the family moved to their estate at Glenlair, near Dumfries, shortly afterwards, James returned to Edinburgh to attend school at The Edinburgh Academy.
    • He continued his education at the Universities of Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • In this article we describe Maxwell's early life in Edinburgh and Glenlair and illustrate it with references to items in the house.
    • His brother Sir George Clerk inherited one part of the families property at Penicuik, south of Edinburgh, while John Clerk Maxwell inherited the Maxwell estate at Middlebie near Dumfries.
    • John Clerk Maxwell's sister Isabella married James Wedderburn and they were living at 31 Heriot Row in Edinburgh.
    • When George Clerk moved to the Penicuik estate, John Clerk Maxwell was left at home with his mother in Edinburgh.
    • He had met Frances through a friendship with her brother John Cay with whom he shared an interest in designing machinery and attending meetings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • James Clerk Maxwell's mother, Frances, had a sister Jane Cay who lived at 6 Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh.
    • It was decided that James should attend the Edinburgh Academy and in November 1841 the family travelled from Glenlair, stopping a few days at his uncles house in Penicuik, and at other relations at Newton, before reaching Isabella Wedderburn's house at 31 Heriot Row on 18 November.
    • James was mostly to live here, but sometimes at Aunt Jane's in Great Stuart Street, while he attended the Edinburgh Academy.
    • You can see a picture at Glenlair, the stop at Newton and the arrival in Edinburgh all taken from watercolours by Jemima Wedderburn.
    • You can see an engraving of Edinburgh Academy as it was when James went there.
    • Edinburgh 10 (1880), 331-339.','5] relates James Clerk Maxwell's early days at the Edinburgh Academy:- .
    • Back in Edinburgh James was taken by his father to a meeting of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 18 December 1843.
    • At the Edinburgh Academy things were about to change [',' M Magnusson, The clacken and the slate (London, 1974).','4]:- .
    • Edinburgh 10 (1880), 331-339.','5]:- .
    • One by his father, as he states in his diary entry and this is now in the possession of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the other by James himself and this copy is on view in the Display Cabinet at 14 India Street.
    • The paper was accepted by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and read to the Society on 6 April 1846.
    • The paper was printed in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and here is Plate XI as it appears in the paper .
    • Edinburgh 10 (1880), 331-339.','5]:- .
    • For example [',' L Campbell and W Garnett, The life of James Clerk Maxwell with selections from his correspondence and occasional writings (London, 1884).','1] he wrote The Song of the Edinburgh Academy in 1848:- .

  3. Tait's scrapbook
    • I gave the lecture at 14 India Street, Edinburgh, the birthplace in 1831 of James Clerk Maxwell, and now owned by the James Clerk Maxwell Foundation.
    • 14 India Street, Edinburgh .
    • The house where James Clerk Maxwell was born is at 14 India Street, Edinburgh about a fifteen-minute walk from the railway station which is in the centre of Edinburgh.
    • From Dalkeith to professor at Edinburgh .
    • Following this his mother moved from Dalkeith to Edinburgh where Peter attended Circus Place School for a year before entering Edinburgh Academy in 1841.
    • There were two important aspects of the move to Edinburgh.
    • Tait was top of his class in each one of his six years at Edinburgh Academy but, of course, Maxwell was not in the same class.
    • In November 1847, Tait entered the University of Edinburgh.
    • Maxwell entered Edinburgh University at the same time at Tait and together they attended the second mathematics class taught by Kelland and the natural philosophy (physics) class taught by James David Forbes.
    • Tait remained at Edinburgh University for only one year before entering Peterhouse, Cambridge in 1848.
    • The Chair of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh became vacant in 1859, J D Forbes having moved to the University of St Andrews to become Principal.
    • When the Edinburgh paper, the Courant, reported the result it noted that Tait had been chosen in preference to Maxwell since:- .
    • The Edinburgh professor .
    • The first extract is from an article about Tait in the student newspaper of the University of Edinburgh:- .
    • Did one wish to give a stranger a good impression of the style and quality of the lectures which are delivered to Edinburgh students, without a doubt he would take him some forenoon to hear Professor Tait.
    • Professor Tait was the last of the old school amongst the Edinburgh professoriate, and he always insisted on maintaining its traditional vogue, no matter how quaint these might now be.
    • Tait was proud of the University of Edinburgh as is clear in his address to graduates in 1888 (taken from the Scrapbook):- .
    • The University of Edinburgh never stood higher, in the estimation of those at least whose judgement is of any value, than on the occasion of its Tercentenary four short years ago.
    • You should let the world know that the true source of mathematical methods as applicable to physics is to be found in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • The activity was at last concluded, however, and the results embodied in a paper which was submitted to the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • The University of Edinburgh conferred "the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws on Professor P.

  4. Chrystal and the RSE
    • The Royal Society Of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street .
    • Professor George Chrystal's close connection with the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) began with his appointment to the chair of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh and continued throughout the rest of his life.
    • He was asked to address the Society in 1879, the year of his appointment to Edinburgh, then he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh at its meeting on Monday, 2nd February 1880.
    • The most important achievement of Chrystal's time as General Secretary was to acquire for the RSE a permanent site for its offices and library at 22-24 George Street, Edinburgh, accommodation it still occupies today although it has recently acquired the adjacent property in addition.
    • For those familiar with Edinburgh today and interested in identifying the Royal Institution, we should say that it has been named the Royal Scottish Academy since 1911.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh now had to fight for recognition that it required accommodation and Chrystal, as its General Secretary, had to organise the Society's case.
    • The Secretary of State for Scotland received a first deputation, which consisted of Fellows of the Society led by its President Lord Kelvin, in Edinburgh.
    • I hope you will by your presence support a deputation next week to the Secretary for Scotland to make a last appeal for justice to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in the matter of its accommodation.
    • The second deputation, again headed by Lord Kelvin, consisted of Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scottish members of parliament, Fellows of the Royal Society of London and other eminent scientists.
    • Sir William Turner persuaded [',' N Campbell, R Martin and S Smellie, The Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783-1983 (Edinburgh, 1983).','1]:- .
    • History of the Royal Society of Edinburgh .

  5. Chrystal and the RSE references
    • References for: The Royal Society Of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street .
    • N Campbell, R Martin and S Smellie, The Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783-1983 (Edinburgh, 1983).

  6. Chrystal and the RSE references
    • References for: The Royal Society Of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street .
    • N Campbell, R Martin and S Smellie, The Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783-1983 (Edinburgh, 1983).

  7. Burt Thompson
    • David Raitt Robertson Burt, Lecturer in Zoology at the University of St Andrews, wrote about Natural History at the University of St Andrews in James B Salmond (ed.), Veterum Laudes (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1950), 108-119.
    • He was born on 2nd May 1860, the son of D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, previously classical master at the Edinburgh Academy and at that time Professor of Greek in Queen's College, Galway.
    • He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy (1870-77) where he was a member of Clyde's class, in which there were a number of boys who afterwards became famous in science or achieved distinction in other spheres.
    • Like his two predecessors in the United College D'Arcy Thompson was a student at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He went from Edinburgh to Cambridge where he studied under F M Balfour and Michael Foster, and after graduating he taught physiology for a year under the latter.

  8. Ledermann interview
    • It was Walter's brother who was studying medicine in Edinburgh who heard about the St Andrews scholarships.
    • Then he said go to Edinburgh, Professor Whittaker might help you - and he did - I was so lucky.
    • He attended the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium of 1938 in St Andrews (the last for a number of years due to the war).
    • The previous Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium had been held in St Andrews in the summer of 1934.

  9. Knots and physics
    • a few days ago Tait showed me in Edinburgh a magnificent way of producing [vortex rings].
    • It is remarkable that Thomson was able to develop his ideas quickly enough that he could publish On vortex atoms in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh still in 1867.
    • These manuscripts by Maxwell were not published at the time they were written despite Tait asking him to submit his ideas on knot theory to the Royal Society of Edinburgh for publication.
    • He returned to the topic of knots in his address to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1883:- .

  10. Gregory's observatory
    • Gregory left St Andrews in the summer of 1674 to take up his new appointment at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Gregory, writing from Edinburgh, replied to James Frazer on 13 July 1675 explaining his reasons for not replying to his earlier letter and for leaving St Andrews: .
    • These and many other discouragements obliged me to accept a call here to the College of Edinburgh where my salary is near double and my encouragements otherwise much greater.
    • I would willingly know when you were transplanted from St Andrews to Edinburgh, if you have removed all the instruments also, and carried them with you, or if they lie still there as appertaining to that University.

  11. U of St Andrews History

  12. Mental arithmetic
    • Aitken became an excellent professional mathematician holding the chair of mathematics in Edinburgh in Scotland.
    • Royal Society for Engineers, London 44 (1954), 295-309.','1] and by an Edinburgh psychologist in [',' I M L Hunter, An exceptional talent for calculative thinking, British Journal of Psychology 53 (3) (1962), 243-258.','9].
    • The second illustration comes from the testing of Aitken's powers by the Psychology Department in Edinburgh.

  13. The four colour theorem
    • He published two improved versions of his proof, the second in 1880 aroused the interest of P G Tait, the Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh.
      Go directly to this paragraph
    • Tait addressed the Royal Society of Edinburgh on the subject and published two papers on the (what we should now call) Four Colour Theorem.
      Go directly to this paragraph

  14. Science in the 17th century
    • The chair was not attached to any college, and James Gregory, who had just become a member of the Royal Society, worked in the Upper Hall of the university library [',' R G Cant, The University of St Andrews: A Short History (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1946).','1].
    • When he was in his apogee, involved in the design and planning of the first observatory in Britain, he left for the University of Edinburgh.

  15. Maxwell's House references
    • Edinburgh 10 (1880), 331-339.

  16. Science in the 17th century references
    • R G Cant, The University of St Andrews: A Short History (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1946).

  17. Christianity and Mathematics references
    • R Hooykaas, Religion and the rise of modern science (Edinburgh, 1973), .

  18. Weather forecasting
    • In 1948, Charney developed the quasi-geostrophic approximation, which reduces several equations of atmospheric motions to only two equations in two unknown variables [','R S Harwood, Atmospheric Dynamics (Chapter 1: Basics, Chapter 5: Balance of Forces in Synoptic Scale Flow, Chapter 13: Quasi-Geostrophic Equations) (University of Edinburgh, 2005) ','14, chapter 13].

  19. Fair book insert
    • Let M denote Nelson's Monument on the Calton Hill of Edinburgh, L the tower at the end of the quay at Leith, I the island of Inchkeith, P the pier at Pettycur, and B the school at Burntisland: also let PB = 10110 feet, the angles PBL = 29°56', IBL = 40°27', LBM = 8°24', MPB = 86°52', LBM = 4°35' and IPL = 37°52'.

  20. Classical light
    • Anyone visiting Edinburgh in Scotland should go to see the camera obscura there near the top of the Royal Mile and marvel at just how effective the camera obscura is in this enjoyable tourist attraction.

  21. Fermat's last theorem
    • However when Taylor lectured at the British Mathematical Colloquium in Edinburgh in April 1995 he gave the impression that no real doubts remained over Fermat's Last Theorem.
      Go directly to this paragraph

  22. Fair book
    • Lord Melville's statue in St Andrews Square Edinburgh is 16 ft high and stands on the top of a column 136 feet high; at what distance from the base of the column in the same horizontal plane will the statue appear under the greatest possible vertical angle, what will that angle be, and at what distaance may the statue be viewed under an angle of 3°.

  23. The Scottish Book
    • What follows is the preface to a typed document entitled "The Scottish Book" sent by Stan Ulam from Los Alamos to Professor Copson in Edinburgh on January 28 1958.

  24. Maxwell's House references
    • Edinburgh 10 (1880), 331-339.

  25. Zero
    • Yet if the same answer is given to the question about the cost of a flight from Edinburgh to New York then I know that three hundred and fifty pounds is what is intended.

  26. Newton poetry
    • He had studied physics as well as literature at Edinburgh University, then went to London where he taught at William Watt's Academy.

  27. Weather forecasting references
    • R S Harwood, Atmospheric Dynamics (Chapter 1: Basics, Chapter 5: Balance of Forces in Synoptic Scale Flow, Chapter 13: Quasi-Geostrophic Equations) (University of Edinburgh, 2005) .

  28. Christianity and Mathematics references
    • R Hooykaas, Religion and the rise of modern science (Edinburgh, 1973), .

  29. Science in the 17th century references
    • R G Cant, The University of St Andrews: A Short History (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1946).

  30. Weather forecasting references
    • R S Harwood, Atmospheric Dynamics (Chapter 1: Basics, Chapter 5: Balance of Forces in Synoptic Scale Flow, Chapter 13: Quasi-Geostrophic Equations) (University of Edinburgh, 2005) .


Societies etc

  1. Royal Society of Edinburgh
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh .
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh was founded in 1783.
    • Although Maclaurin died nearly forty years before the founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh he played a very important part.
    • The Society for the Improvement of Medical Knowledge was founded in Edinburgh in 1731 and Maclaurin became one of its members.
    • Not happy with such restricted topics, he worked to expand the Medical Society of Edinburgh into a wider society to include other branches of learning.
    • In 1737 the broader Society was formed with the full title "Edinburgh Society for Improving Arts and Sciences and particularly Natural Knowledge".
    • As one might expect this was far too long a title for people to use, and the Society was known as the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh.
    • The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh was not the only Edinburgh Society of which Maclaurin was a member.
    • He also belonged to the Rankenian Club which met in Ranken's Inn in Edinburgh.
    • This Club was founded in 1716 nearly ten years before Maclaurin was appointed to the University of Edinburgh, and it was a Club which suited Maclaurin with its mixture of congenial fellowship and the aim of its members in pursuing knowledge.
    • It is generally accepted that the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh was the major player in the move towards the establishment of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, but undoubtedly the Rankenian Club played its part.
    • Shapin describes the events which led to the founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in [',' S A Shapin, The Royal Society of Edinburgh : A study of the social context of Hanoverian science (Doctoral Thesis, University of Pennsylvania, 1971).','2], see also his paper [',' S A Shapin, The Royal Society of Edinburgh, British J.
    • Both the University of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Advocates worried about this proposal by the Society of Antiquaries, for they saw an expanded Society with a Royal Charter as a competitor to them in certain of their functions.
    • In a move to counter this proposal the Professor of History at the University of Edinburgh, John Walker, proposed that the University of Edinburgh, the Faculty of Advocates, the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh, and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland should seek a Royal Charter to establish the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Proposal for establishing at Edinburgh, a Society for the advancement of Learning and Useful Knowledge.
    • Unable to agree, a meeting between the Rev Robertson, Principal of the University of Edinburgh, and Buchan, the leader of the Society of Antiquaries, was suggested.
    • This left two separate parties who now both aimed to set up a Royal Society in Edinburgh.
    • The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh proposed to the University of Edinburgh that they go it alone in setting up the Society.
    • The Faculty of Advocates and a Member of Parliament for Edinburgh made preliminary enquiries in London and advised the University of Edinburgh to proceed.
    • The authors of [',' N Campbell, R Martin and S Smellie, The Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783-1983 (Edinburgh, 1983).
    • The Senatus [of the University of Edinburgh] met on 30 November 1782, a petition was submitted to the King, and on 29 March 1783 the King's signature was obtained.
    • On 6 May 1783, the Royal Charter and that of the Society of Antiquaries were extended under the Great Seal in Edinburgh.
    • The first meeting of the new Royal Society of Edinburgh took place in the Old Library of Edinburgh University on Monday 23 June 1783.
    • It was decided that all members of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh should automatically become Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • From its beginnings the Society set itself up as a Scottish wide Society, based in Edinburgh.
    • The beginning of the Royal Society of Edinburgh was described in the first volume of the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh published in 1788.
    • About the end of the year 1782 in a meeting of the Professors of the University of Edinburgh, many of whom were likewise members of the Philosophical Society and warmly attached to its interests, a scheme was proposed by the Rev.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh met in the library of Edinburgh University in its early years.
    • The story of how the Society was ejected from the Royal Institution and their subsequent fight for a new home is recounted in our article The Royal Society of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street.
    • From its beginnings the Royal Society of Edinburgh was not exclusively a scientific society.
    • From 1890 to 1895 Thomson was President of the Royal Society of London, then, this time as Lord Kelvin, he was President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh for a third time from 1895 until his death in 1907.
    • Three mathematicians from our archive served the Royal Society of Edinburgh as General Secretaries: Playfair from 1798 to 1819, Tait from 1879 to 1901, and Chrystal from 1901 to 1912.
    • It was during Chrystal's time as General Secretary that the Society was forced out of its rooms in the Royal Institution and the story of this is told in the separate article The Royal Society of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street.
    • Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (alphabetical list) .
    • Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (chronological list) .

  2. Edinburgh Mathematical Society
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883.
    • However the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was rather different from the other societies since it was founded by school teachers rather than by university teachers.
    • The initial idea came from two mathematics teachers at George Watson's College in Edinburgh, namely A Y Fraser and A J G Barclay.
    • Together with Cargill G Knott, assistant to the professor of physics at the University of Edinburgh P G Tait, they sent out a letter dated 23 January 1883:- .
    • to gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge, and throughout Scotland generally whom we deem likely to take an interest in such a Society..
    • on Friday 2 February 1883 in the Mathematics Classroom of Edinburgh University.
    • The first president, elected at the meeting, was J S Mackay, the head mathematics master at The Edinburgh Academy.
    • George Chrystal, the professor of mathematics at Edinburgh University, and Peter Guthrie Tait, the professor of natural philosophy, were elected honorary members of the Society at this first meeting.
    • In 1884 the Society began publication of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Although initially an Edinburgh Society, it very soon extended its remit to cover Scotland.
    • The Society held its first meeting outside Edinburgh when it met in Glasgow in March 1900.
    • George Chrystal, one of the Society's first honorary members, died in 1911 and in the following year Edmund Whittaker took up Chrystal's chair in Edinburgh.
    • Almost immediately he encouraged the Edinburgh Mathematical Society to hold a mathematical colloquium which it did in Edinburgh in 1913.
    • A second colloquium was held in Edinburgh in the following year, prior to the outbreak of World War I, but the series had to be discontinued for the duration of the War.
    • Turnbull was appointed Regius Professor of Mathematics in the United College of St Salvator and St Leonard at the University of St Andrews in 1921 and he was enthusiastic that the Edinburgh Mathematical Society should resume its Colloquium but that the venue should be St Andrews.
    • (Many) more details about the Edinburgh Mathematical Society are given at THIS LINK.

  3. References for RSE
    • References for Edinburgh Royal Society .
    • N Campbell, R Martin and S Smellie, The Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783-1983 (Edinburgh, 1983).
    • S A Shapin, The Royal Society of Edinburgh : A study of the social context of Hanoverian science (Doctoral Thesis, University of Pennsylvania, 1971).
    • S A Shapin, The Royal Society of Edinburgh, British J.

  4. References for EMS
    • References for Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • P Heywood, Edinburgh Mathematical Society, European Mathematical Society Newsletter 33 (September, 1999), 18-20.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  5. EMS 1980
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1980 .

  6. EMS 1951
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1951 .

  7. EMS 1938
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1938 .

  8. EMS 1930
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1930 .

  9. EMS 1955
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1955 .

  10. EMS 1996
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1996 .

  11. EMS 1926
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1926 .

  12. EMS 1968
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1968 .

  13. EMS 1926
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1926 .

  14. EMS 1959
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1959 .

  15. EMS 1934
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1934 .

  16. EMS 1913
    • EMS Colloquium held in Edinburgh in 1913 .

  17. EMS 1984
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1984 .

  18. EMS 1992
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1992 .

  19. EMS 1972
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1972 .

  20. EMS 1964
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1964 .

  21. EMS 1988
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1988 .

  22. EMS 1976
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1976 .

  23. List of societies by date of foundation
    • 1783 Edinburgh Royal Society .
    • 1883 Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  24. Allahabad Mathematical Society
    • The Society has reciprocity arrangement with various Societies including the American Mathematical Society, the Canadian Mathematical Society, the Cambridge Philosophical Society, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society.
    • He was given leave to travel to the UK in 1929 and, after spending a while at Edinburgh, he went to the University of Liverpool where he completed a Ph.D.

  25. Quaternion Association
    • Alexander Macfarlane (1851-1913) studied at the University of Edinburgh where he wrote a Ph.D.
    • After teaching at the University of Edinburgh and the University of St Andrews, Macfarlane went to the United States where he was professor of physics at the University of Texas from 1885 to 1894, and then professor of mathematical physics at Lehigh University.

  26. Alphabetical List of Mathematical Societies
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Edinburgh Royal Society .

  27. South African Mathematical Society
    • in statistics from the University of Edinburgh in 1947 for his thesis On Multivariate Sampling With and Without Replacement supervised by Alex Aitken, had been appointed to the Statistics Department in the University of Pretoria in 1949.

  28. New Zealand Mathematical Society
    • It set about the task of making reciprocity agreements with other Societies, mostly overseas, and agreements have been made with the American Mathematical Society, the Australian Mathematical Society, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Society of Japan, the London Mathematical Society and the Southeast Asian Mathematical Society.

  29. Irish Mathematical Society
    • The Irish Mathematical Society (Cumann Matamaitice na heireann) came into being on 14 April 1976 when a constitution, based on that of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, was accepted by a meeting held in Trinity College Dublin following a symposium organised by the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.

  30. British Association
    • Before we end this article, let us note that Brewster became principal of the United College of St Salvator and St Leonard of the University of St Andrews in 1838 and then, in 1859, became principal of the University of Edinburgh.


Honours

  1. Royal Society of Edinburgh
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh .
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh was founded in 1783.
    • Although Maclaurin died nearly forty years before the founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh he played a very important part.
    • The Society for the Improvement of Medical Knowledge was founded in Edinburgh in 1731 and Maclaurin became one of its members.
    • Not happy with such restricted topics, he worked to expand the Medical Society of Edinburgh into a wider society to include other branches of learning.
    • In 1737 the broader Society was formed with the full title "Edinburgh Society for Improving Arts and Sciences and particularly Natural Knowledge".
    • As one might expect this was far too long a title for people to use, and the Society was known as the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh.
    • The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh was not the only Edinburgh Society of which Maclaurin was a member.
    • He also belonged to the Rankenian Club which met in Ranken's Inn in Edinburgh.
    • This Club was founded in 1716 nearly ten years before Maclaurin was appointed to the University of Edinburgh, and it was a Club which suited Maclaurin with its mixture of congenial fellowship and the aim of its members in pursuing knowledge.
    • It is generally accepted that the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh was the major player in the move towards the establishment of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, but undoubtedly the Rankenian Club played its part.
    • Shapin describes the events which led to the founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in [2], see also his paper [4].
    • Both the University of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Advocates worried about this proposal by the Society of Antiquaries for they saw an expanded Society with a Royal Charter as a competitor to them in certain of its functions.
    • In a move to counter this proposal the Professor of History at the University of Edinburgh, John Walker, proposed that the University of Edinburgh, the Faculty of Advocates, the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh, and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland should seek a Royal Charter to establish the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Proposal for establishing at Edinburgh, a Society for the advancement of Learning and Useful Knowledge.
    • Unable to agree, a meeting between the Rev Robertson, Principal of the University of Edinburgh, and Buchan, the leader of the Society of Antiquaries, was suggested.
    • This left two separate parties who now both aimed to set up a Royal Society in Edinburgh.
    • The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh proposed to the University of Edinburgh that they go it alone in setting up the Society.
    • The Faculty of Advocates and a Member of Parliament for Edinburgh made preliminary enquiries in London and advised the University of Edinburgh to proceed.
    • The Senatus [of the University of Edinburgh] met on 30 November 1782, a petition was submitted to the King, and on 29 March 1783 the King's signature was obtained.
    • On 6 May 1783, the Royal Charter and that of the Society of Antiquaries were extended under the Great Seal in Edinburgh.
    • The first meeting of the new Royal Society of Edinburgh took place in the Old Library of Edinburgh University on Monday 23 June 1783.
    • It was decided that all members of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh should automatically become Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • From its beginnings the Society set itself up as a Scottish wide Society, based in Edinburgh.
    • The beginning of the Royal Society of Edinburgh was described in the first volume of the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh published in 1788.
    • About the end of the year 1782 in a meeting of the Professors of the University of Edinburgh, many of whom were likewise members of the Philosophical Society and warmly attached to its interests, a scheme was proposed by the Rev.
    • The Royal Society met in the library of Edinburgh University in its early years.
    • The story of how the Society was ejected from the Royal Institution and their subsequent fight for a new home is recounted in our article The Royal Society Of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street.
    • From its beginnings the Royal Society of Edinburgh was not exclusively a scientific society.
    • From 1890 to 1895 Thomson was President of the Royal Society of London, then, this time as Lord Kelvin, he was President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh for a third time from 1895 until his death in 1907.
    • Three mathematicians from our archive served the Royal Society of Edinburgh as General Secretaries: Playfair from 1798 to 1819, Tait from 1879 to 1901, and Chrystal from 1901 to 1912.
    • It was during Chrystal 's time as General Secretary that the Society was forced out of its rooms in the Royal Institution and the story of this is told in the separate article The Royal Society Of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street.
    • There is a link below to some of the mathematicians in this archive who have been elected Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: .
    • N Campbell, R Martin and S Smellie, The Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783-1983 (Edinburgh, 1983).
    • S A Shapin, The Royal Society of Edinburgh : A study of the social context of Hanoverian science (Doctoral Thesis, University of Pennsylvania, 1971).
    • S A Shapin, The Royal Society of Edinburgh, British J.
    • Fellows of the Royal Society Of Edinburgh (Alphabetical list) .
    • Fellows of the Royal Society Of Edinburgh (Chronological list) .
    • The Royal Society Of Edinburgh and the purchase of 22-24 George Street .

  2. Fellows of the RSE
    • Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh .
    • Below is a list of about 330 Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh who were (among other things) mathematicians.

  3. Fellows of the RSE
    • Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh .
    • Below is a list of about 330 Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh who were (among other things) mathematicians.

  4. Cumming
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  5. Stewart 2
    • Birth place: In the College Buildings of Edinburgh .

  6. MacKnight
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  7. Scott
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  8. Brown Alexander
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  9. Butters
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  10. Schlapp
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  11. Swan
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  12. Russell
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  13. Hodge
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  14. Hamilton 2
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  15. Macdonald
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  16. Brown 1
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  17. Levy Hyman
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  18. Goodwillie
    • Birth place: Liberton, Edinburgh .

  19. McLaren
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  20. Marshall 1
    • Birth place: 31 Howe Street, Edinburgh .

  21. Macintyre
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  22. Allardice
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  23. Thompson D'Arcy
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  24. Lang
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  25. Russell A D
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  26. Stewart Dugald
    • Birth place: In the College Buildings of Edinburgh .

  27. Scott Lang
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  28. Maxwell
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  29. Rankine
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  30. Lamb 1
    • Birth place: Royal Bank House, Granton, Edinburgh .

  31. Abel Prize
    • 2004 Sir Michael Francis Atiyah, University of Edinburgh and Isadore M Singer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology:- .

  32. Lagrange Prize
    • Awarded every four years, it was awarded for the first time at the Opening Ceremony of ICIAM 99 in Edinburgh, Scotland, in July 1999.

  33. Collatz Prize
    • Awarded every four years, it was awarded for the first time at the Opening Ceremony of ICIAM 99 in Edinburgh, Scotland, in July 1999.

  34. Mitchell James
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  35. Hutton James
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .

  36. International Congress Speaker
    • EDINBURGH 1958 .

  37. Pioneer Prize
    • Awarded every four years, it was awarded for the first time at the Opening Ceremony of ICIAM 99 in Edinburgh, Scotland, in July 1999.

  38. Copson lectures.html
    • His wife, Beatrice, the elder of two daughters of Edmund Taylor Whittaker, professor of mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, died in February 2004.

  39. Maxwell Prize
    • Awarded every four years, it was awarded for the first time at the Opening Ceremony of ICIAM 99 in Edinburgh, Scotland, in July 1999.

  40. IMA President
    • HRH The Duke of Edinburgh 1976 - 1977 .

  41. Mitchell
    • Birth place: Edinburgh .


References

  1. References for Sprague
    • Shelved at: VXL/73 rsl [IF archive] (Lon) [Faculty: Edinburgh University Library, Special Collections Department 072.1942 SPR] [RKN: 4587] .
    • [Faculty: Edinburgh University Library, Special Collections Department Pamphlet file, vol 13] [RKN: 70761] .
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh, Archive of Fellows, .
    • T B Sprague, Annuities, article in 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica (scientific eds, J Clerk Maxwell and T H Huxley) (A and C Black, Edinburgh, 1875).
    • [Faculty: Edinburgh University Library, Special Collections Department 368.3 SPR Pamphlet file, vol 13 Pamphlet file, vol 44] [RKN: 70199] .
    • T B Sprague, On the nature of the curves whose intersections give the imaginary roots of an algebraic equation, Transactions of Royal Society of Edinburgh 30 (1882), 467-480.
    • T B Sprague, On a new algebra, by means of which permutations can be transformed in a variety of ways, and their properties investigated, Transactions of Royal Society of Edinburgh 37 (1893), 399-411.
    • T B Sprague, Note on the evaluation of functions of the form 00, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1884).
    • T B Sprague, On the different possible non-linear arrangements of eight men on a chess board, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1889).
    • T B Sprague, On the transformation and classification of permutations, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1890).
    • T B Sprague, On the geometrical interpretation of ii, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1893).
    • T B Sprague, On the eight Queens' problem, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1899).
    • T B Sprague, On the singular points of plane curves, Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1902).
    • T B Sprague, Presidential Address to the Actuarial Society of Edinburgh and to the Faculty of Actuaries, Transactions of the Actuarial Society of Edinburgh, 1, 269-287.

  2. References for Playfair
    • D Allan, Virtue, Learning and the Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh, 1993).
    • J H Burnett, D Howarth and S D Fletcher, The University Portraits (Edinburgh, 1986).
    • H Coburn, Memorial's of His Time (Edinburgh, 1861).
    • R Guild and A Law, Edinburgh University Library 1580 to 1980 : A Collection of Historical Essays (Edinburgh, 1982).
    • F Jeffrey, The Works of John Playfair (Edinburgh, 1822).
    • A G Playfair, The Playfair Book or Notes on the Scottish Family of Playfair (Edinburgh, 1932).
    • D Talbot Rice, The University Portraits (Edinburgh, 1957), 171-173.

  3. References for Chrystal
    • Edinburgh 32 (1911-12), 477.
    • G Chrystal, Promoter's Address to Graduates of Arts, University of Edinburgh, The Scotsman Edinburgh, 22 April 1885.
    • G Chrystal, Promoter's Address to The Graduates in Arts and Science, University Of Edinburgh The Scotsman Edinburgh, 15 April, 1892.
    • G Chrystal, Promoter's Address to Graduates of Arts, University of Edinburgh, The Scotsman Edinburgh, 11 April, 1908.
    • J S Flett, Notice of Account of His Student Days, 1886-1894, Edinburgh University Library MSS DC.6.116, 10-11.

  4. References for Sang
    • (possibly C G Knott), Dr Edward Sang's Logarithmic, Trigonometrical, and Astronomical Tables, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1907-8), 183-196.
    • D Bruce Peebles, Edward Sang (with list of writings), Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (Obituary Notices), 21 (1897), xvii-xxxii.
    • Edward Sang MSS and related papers, The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, Acc.
    • (89 volumes/items of tables, correspondence etc., previously held by the Royal Society of Edinburgh).
    • Edward Sang MSS, Edinburgh University Library 40 vols.
    • C D Waterston, Notes on portraits in oils, busts and statuettes, the property of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, displayed in the rooms of the Society, The Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook (1994), 83-117.

  5. References for Mackie
    • T M M Allen, John Mackie obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 40 (1956) 27-28.
    • John Mackie obituary, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book (1956), 43-4.
    • First Matriculation Book (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).
    • Theses and Prize Essays (University of Edinburgh).

  6. References for Bevan-Baker
    • (Edin.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1964, 7-8.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates, 1859-88 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  7. References for Dunbar
    • Biographical index of Alumni and Staff, Edinburgh University.
    • Graduates in Arts Under New Ordinances, 1915, Edinburgh University.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  8. References for Russell A D
    • Alexander Durie Russell obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 40 (1956), 32.
    • Alexander Durie Russell obituary, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book (1956), 47-48.
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Science (University of Edinburgh).

  9. References for Archibald James
    • Edinburgh 46 (1925-26), 385.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates, 1859-88 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  10. References for Beattie
    • L Crawford, Sir John Carruthers Beattie, Kt., D.Sc., LL.D., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, 12-13.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates, 1859-88 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  11. References for Hardie Patrick
    • S Smith, Patrick Sinclair Hardie, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1944, 20.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Science (University of Edinburgh).

  12. References for Barclay
    • Edinburgh Yearbook (1944), 29.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates, 1859-88 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  13. References for Cunningham Leslie
    • J M Whittaker, Leslie Bennet Craigie Cunningham, 0.B.E., M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, 18-19.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  14. References for MacMillan Chrystal
    • W N Boog Watson, The First Eight Ladies, University of Edinburgh Journal 23 (1967-1968), 227-234.
    • Obituary: Jessie Chrystal Macmillan, University of Edinburgh Journal 9 (1937-1938).
    • Jessie Chrystal Macmillan, Graduates in Science up to 1899 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Jessie Chrystal Macmillan, Graduates in Arts 1898-1900 (University of Edinburgh).

  15. References for Burgess
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  16. References for Macdonald James
    • Edinburgh 57 (1936-37), 436.
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Science (University of Edinburgh).

  17. References for Gibb
    • R Smart, David Gibb obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 36 (1947), 28-30.
    • First Matriculation 1900-01 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  18. References for Brown Thomas
    • (Cantab.)., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1966, 11-12.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  19. References for Buchan
    • (Edin.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1977, 27-28.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  20. References for Meiklejohn
    • H Jack, John Meiklejohn obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952) 24-25.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  21. References for Kennedy-Fraser
    • David Kennedy-Fraser, M.A., B.Sc., F.E.I.S., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1963, 18-19.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  22. References for Carse
    • A Melville Clark, George Alexander Carse, M.A., D.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1951, 9-11.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  23. References for Whittaker
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  24. References for Lockhart
    • (Edin.), F.R.S.E., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1970, 33-34.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  25. References for Terrot
    • J Grant, Old and New Edinburgh: Its History, its People, and its Places, IV (London, 1881).
    • Charles Hughes Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh; and George Grub, Professor of Law in the University of Aberdeen (Edinburgh, 1893).
    • Edinburgh, VIII (85) (1872-1873), 9-14.

  26. References for Johnstone
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).
    • Minutes of the Edinburgh Provincial Committee for Teacher Training.

  27. References for McBride
    • Many solutions or none? A centenary account, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 33 (January 1943), 1-13.
    • J A M'Bride, Two illustrations of Newton's Third Law, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 2 (1909), 16-18.
    • R A Robb, James Alexander McBride, B.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1950 (Edinburgh, 1951), 27.

  28. References for Gentle
    • (Edin.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1965, 17-18.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  29. References for Brown Alexander
    • L Crawford, Alexander Brown, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1949, 10-11.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  30. References for Simpson Mary
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • First Matriculation Book 1919-20 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  31. References for Vilant
    • D M Masson, Memories of two Cities, Edinburgh and Aberdeen, in F Masson (ed.), Macmillan's Magazine (Oliphant, Anderson & Co., Edinburgh and London, 1864-65).
    • Edinburgh, n.d.
    • Printed for Bell & Bradfute, Edinburgh, and F Wingrave, London (1783/1798).

  32. References for Calderwood
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  33. References for Madwar
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  34. References for Frewin
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  35. References for Tweedie D J
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  36. References for Scott Agnes
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  37. References for Butters
    • J B Clark, John Watt Butters, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, 17-18.
    • I M H Etherington, John Butters obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 36 (1947), 24.
    • First Matriculation 1869-1888 (University of Edinburgh).

  38. References for Turner John
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  39. References for Napier
    • L Gladstone-Millar, John Napier: Logarithm John (Edinburgh, 2003) .
    • M Napier, Memoirs of John Napier of Merchiston, his lineage, life, and times, with a history of the invention of logarithms (Edinburgh, 1904).
    • G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.

  40. References for Grieve
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  41. References for Merriles
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  42. References for Cassels James
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  43. References for Weatherhead
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  44. References for Gray Marion
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  45. References for Moffat
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  46. References for Numbers
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  47. References for Lumsden
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  48. References for Wallace
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • D Talbot Rice, The University Portraits (Edinburgh, 1957), 217-218.

  49. References for Etherington
    • Edinburgh.
    • T A Gillespie, Ivor Malcolm Haddon Etherington BA(Oxon), PhD, DSc(Edin), Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook 1995 (1995), 101-.
    • D Monk, Obituary: Ivor Malcolm Haddon Etherington, University of Edinburgh Bulletin (1995).

  50. References for Williamson
    • H W Turnbull, John Williamson obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952), 23-24.
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  51. References for Maclaurin
    • Colin Maclaurin, The Scottish Nation III (Edinburgh, 1869), 37-38.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • R Schlapp, Colin Maclaurin : A biographical note, Edinburgh Math.

  52. References for Maxwell
    • E G Forbes, James Clerk Maxwell (Edinburgh, 1982).
    • P M Harman, Edinburgh philosophy and Cambridge physics : the natural philosophy of James Clerk Maxwell, in Wranglers and physicists (Manchester, 1985), 202-224.
    • Edinburgh 10 (1880), 331-339.

  53. References for Hardie Robert
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  54. References for Brash
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  55. References for Drysdale
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts, 1884-1925 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  56. References for Ince
    • A W Young, Edward Lindsay Ince, Year Book of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1940-41), 18.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  57. References for Ford
    • Lester R Ford., M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics, University of Edinburgh, The Gambolier VII (12) (Wednesday, 27 January 1915), 140.
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).

  58. References for Coutts
    • First Matriculation 1904-05 (University of Edinburgh).
    • Graduates in Arts (University of Edinburgh).

  59. References for Pairman
    • First Matriculation Book, 1914-1915, Edinburgh University.
    • Graduates in Arts, 1917, Edinburgh University.

  60. References for Sommerville
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh 54 (1935), 220-221.

  61. References for Blades
    • First Matriculation Book, 1894, Edinburgh University.
    • Graduates in Arts, 1898-1900, Edinburgh University.

  62. References for Morgan William
    • Andrew Press, Edinburgh, (1992) .
    • Clark, Edinburgh (1914).

  63. References for Mackenzie
    • First Matriculation Book, 1919-1920, Edinburgh University.
    • Graduates in Arts, 1924, Edinburgh University.

  64. References for Stewart
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh 1 (1788), 57-76.

  65. References for Philip Flora
    • The First Eight Ladies, University of Edinburgh Journal 23 (), 227-234.
    • M Hartveit, How Flora got her cap: the higher education of women in Edinburgh, BSHM Bulletin 24 (2009) .

  66. References for Rutherford
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1966-67 (1968), 41-43.

  67. References for Lonie
    • C Roger, History of St Andrews: with a full account of the recent improvements in the city (Adam & Charles Black, Edinburgh, 1849).
    • Reports from the Commissioners Education Scotland Session 1867-68 XXIX Appendix (Thomas Constable, Edinburgh, 1868).

  68. References for Macintyre
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society 12 (1960-61), 112.
    • E M Wright, Sheila Scott Macintyre, Year Book of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1961), 21-23.

  69. References for Stirling
    • I Tweddle, James Stirling: this about series and such things (Edinburgh, 1988).
    • J Ramsay, Scotland and Scotsmen in the Eighteenth Century (Edinburgh, 1888).

  70. References for Jack Henry
    • H Jack, John G B Meiklejohn, The Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952), 23-24.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  71. References for Spence
    • J Galt, The Life of William Spence, in John Herschel (ed.), Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1819), i-v.
    • Mathematical Essays by the late William Spence, Esq., The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal 7 (1822), 194.

  72. References for Carre
    • D Brewster (ed.), Louis Carre, in The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia 5 (2) (William Blackwood, Edinburgh, 1830), 545-546.

  73. References for Rankine
    • D E Channell, Rankine : William John Macquorn Rankine, FRSE, FRS (Edinburgh, 1986).
    • Edinburgh 8 (1875), 296-306.

  74. References for Aitken
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1967-68 (1969), 5-8.

  75. References for Wedderburn
    • S., Edinburgh Math.
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1946-48 (1949), 51-52.

  76. References for Macintyre Archibald
    • Edinburgh Math.

  77. References for Russell
    • J Watling, Bertrand Russell (Edinburgh, 1970).

  78. References for Gillespie
    • (Cantab.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1978, 31-32.

  79. References for Hamill
    • W L Edge, Obituary: Miss C M Hamill, Edinburgh Math.

  80. References for Metzler
    • A C Aitken, William Henry Metzler, A.B., Ph.D., Hon.D.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1946, 34.

  81. References for Peddie
    • R Smart, William Peddie obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 36 (1947) 26-27 .

  82. References for Bell Robert
    • (Otago), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1966, 10-11.

  83. References for Timms
    • W L Edge, Geoffrey Timms O.B.E., Ph.D.(Cantab.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1984, 213.

  84. References for Butchart
    • Edinburgh 51 (1930-31), 200-201.

  85. References for Pack
    • 14 April 1920 - 3 December 2016, Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  86. References for Craig James
    • H J L Robbie, James Ireland Craig, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 39 (1954) 18 .

  87. References for Schlapp
    • N Kemmer, Robert Schlapp M.A.(Edin.), Ph.D.(Cantab.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1993, 111-114.

  88. References for Lidstone
    • R Ll Gwilt, George James Lidstone, LL.D., F.I.A., F.F.A., F.S.A., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1953, 28-30.

  89. References for Young Thomas
    • D-F Arago, Biographical memoir of Dr Thomas Young, Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal 20 (1836), 213-240.

  90. References for Watson
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1964-65 (1966), 37-39.

  91. References for Feuerbach
    • Edinburgh Math.

  92. References for Levi-Civita
    • H S Ruse, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita, Edinburgh Math.

  93. References for Goldie
    • (St Andrews), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1965, 18-20.

  94. References for McKendrick
    • W F Harvey, Anderson Gray McKendrick, 1876-1943, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1944, 23-24.

  95. References for Newton
    • Edinburgh Sect.

  96. References for Ross
    • E T Whittaker, Edward Burns Ross, M.A., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1948/1949, 43.

  97. References for Ramsay
    • Edinburgh 46 (1925-26), 382.

  98. References for Einstein
    • Edinburgh A 61 (1942), 231-246.

  99. References for Steggall
    • W Peddie, J E A Steggall, Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Series 2, 4 (1934-36), 270-271 .

  100. References for Morrison
    • (Cape Town), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1945, 20.

  101. References for Jerrard
    • J Cockle, Concluding remarks on a recent mathematical controversy, London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine (4) 26 (1863), 223-224.

  102. References for Paton
    • M A S Ross, James Paton M.A., B.Sc.(Edin.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1974, 15-18.

  103. References for Mackay J S
    • Edinburgh Math.

  104. References for Roach
    • A McBride, Gary Francis Roach, OStJ, FRAS, FIMA, FRSA, Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  105. References for Liouville
    • Edinburgh 14 (1888), 83-91.

  106. References for Gray James
    • Edinburgh 55 (1934-35), 154-155.

  107. References for West
    • the author by Edward Sang (Edinburgh, 1838).

  108. References for Eastwood
    • A Waterson, George Samuel Eastwood obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 39 (1954) 17 .

  109. References for Arthur
    • (Glas.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1980, 32-33.

  110. References for Kuratowski
    • F.R.S.E., Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1980-81 (1982), 40-47.

  111. References for Gibson
    • Edinburgh Math.

  112. References for Harnack
    • A Harnack, An introduction to the study of the elements of the differential and integral calculus (William and Norgate, London and Edinburgh, 1891).

  113. References for McQuistan
    • R O Street, Dougald Black McQuistan, M.A., B.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, 23-24.

  114. References for Babbage
    • D Lardner, Babbage's calculating engines, Edinburgh Review 59 (1834), 263-327.

  115. References for Sachs
    • Edinburgh Math.

  116. References for Morgan Alexander
    • Edinburgh Yearbook (1947), 25.

  117. References for Young Andrew
    • (Edin.), W.S., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1970, 53-54.

  118. References for Sharp
    • N S Heineken, Relics of the mechanical productions of Abraham Sharp, the assistant of Flamsteed, London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine 30 (1847), 25-27.

  119. References for Hobbes
    • G C Robertson, Hobbes (Edinburgh, 1971).

  120. References for McArthur
    • W Arthur, Neil McArthur obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952) 27-28 .

  121. References for Mikhlin
    • S G Mikhlin, Multidimensional singular integrals and integral equations, International Series of Monographs in Pure and Applied Mathematics 83 (Pergamon Press, Oxford-London-Edinburgh-New York-Paris-Frankfurt, 1965).

  122. References for Burchnall
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1974-75 (1976), 30-33.

  123. References for Graham Tommy
    • Edinburgh Math.

  124. References for Childs
    • (Birm.), F.Inst.P., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1957, 10-12.

  125. References for Thomson W L
    • E T Whittaker, William Leslie Thomson obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 38 (1952) 25-26 .

  126. References for Muir
    • H W Turnbull, Thomas Muir, Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Series 2, 4 (1934-36), 263-267 .

  127. References for Milne Archibald
    • J R Peddie, Archibald Milne, M.A., D.Sc., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1959/1960, 92-93.

  128. References for Aristotle
    • Edinburgh, Sect.

  129. References for Brahe
    • J L E Dreyer, Tycho Brahe, a picture of scientific life and work in the Seventeenth Century (Edinburgh, 1890, New York, 1963).

  130. References for McCrea
    • M Longair, Sir William Hunter McCrea, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book (2000), 192-194.

  131. References for Lawson
    • Edinburgh Math.

  132. References for Knott
    • Edinburgh Math.

  133. References for Brown Walter
    • (Glas.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1958, 14-15.

  134. References for Brouwer
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1966-67 (1968), 10-27.

  135. References for Kelland
    • (Edinburgh, 1961) .

  136. References for Allardice
    • Edinburgh 48 (1927-28), 209-10 .

  137. References for Tait
    • D B Wilson, P G Tait and Edinburgh natural philosophy, 1860-1901, Ann.

  138. References for Comrie
    • J Mackie, Peter Comrie obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 36 (1947), 25.

  139. References for Alison
    • G Robertson, John Alison, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1953, 5.

  140. References for Briggs
    • G A Gibson, Napier and the invention of logarithms, in E M Horsburgh (ed.), Napier Tercentenary Celebration : Handbook of the exhibition (Edinburgh, 1914), 1-16.

  141. References for Erdelyi
    • Edinburgh Math.

  142. References for Smith John
    • Edinburgh Math.

  143. References for Ruse
    • A W Goldie, Harold Stanley Ruse M.A.(Oxon), D.Sc.(Edin.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1975, 47-48.

  144. References for Thompson DArcy
    • R D'Arcy Thompson, The Remarkable Gamgees (Edinburgh, 1974).

  145. References for Wilson Alexander
    • Edinburgh 10 (1824), 279-297.

  146. References for Muirhead
    • Edinburgh Math.

  147. References for Jack
    • E T Copson, David Jack M.A., B.Sc.(Edin.), Ph.D.(St Andrews), F.Inst.P., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1976, 54-55.

  148. References for Macdonald William
    • Edinburgh Yearbook (1943), 15.

  149. References for Tweedie
    • Edinburgh Math.

  150. References for Penney
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1990-91 (1992), 37-39.

  151. References for Wilson John 2
    • Edinburgh 22 (1897-99), i-ii.

  152. References for Dougall
    • I N Sneddon, John Dougall, Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1962, 33-34.

  153. References for Crawford
    • (Wit.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1952, 14-15.

  154. References for Carr
    • R O'Malley, The People Were Great in Edinburgh! A Highly Personal Trip Account, SIAM News (23 September 1999).

  155. References for Larmor
    • Edinburgh 2 (1941-42), 11-13.

  156. References for Collingwood
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1969-71 (1971-2), 37-41.

  157. References for Gray Andrew
    • Edinburgh 45 (1924-25), 373-377.

  158. References for Copson
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1979-80 (1981), 8-11.

  159. References for Cantor Moritz
    • Edinburgh Math.

  160. References for Eddington
    • A V Douglas, The life of Arthur Stanley Eddington (Edinburgh-New York, 1956).

  161. References for Watt
    • E M Wedderburn, James Watt, LL.D., W.S., F.F.A., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1947, 36-37.

  162. References for McIntosh
    • J Ritchie, Donald Cameron McIntosh, M.A., D.Sc., J.P., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1958, 40-41.

  163. References for Jack William
    • Edinburgh 44 (1923-24), 255-257.

  164. References for Wilson Bertram
    • Edinburgh Math.

  165. References for Bath
    • (Cantab.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1984, 167-169.

  166. References for Thomson William
    • J M Watt, Sir William Thomson, Kt., M.A., B.Sc., LL.D., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1948/1949, 48-49.

  167. References for Greaves
    • W H McCrea, William Greaves obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 40 (1956) 28-30 .

  168. References for Veblen
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1960-61 (1962).

  169. References for Hutton James
    • Edinburgh 5 (1805), 39-99.

  170. References for Edge
    • D Monk, Professor W L Edge, The Scotsman (Edinburgh, 4 Oct 1997).

  171. References for Fraser
    • Edinburgh 18 (1890-91), 12-13.

  172. References for Gwilt
    • J M Ross, Richard Lloyd Gwilt C.B.E., F.F.A., F.I.A., F.S.S., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1973, 34-35.

  173. References for Atiyah
    • Maths experts meet to sum up the achievements of Sir Michael, 80, Edinburgh Evening News (22 April 2009).

  174. References for Robb
    • (Glas.), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1978, 52-53.

  175. References for Mitchell James
    • (Edin.)., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1959/1960, 93.

  176. References for DArcy
    • Patrick d'Arcy, in David Brewster (ed.), The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia 2 (J and E Parker, 1832), 316-318.

  177. References for Guthrie
    • (St Andrews), Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1979, 35-36.

  178. References for Scott Lang
    • Edinburgh 46 (1925-26), 370-371.

  179. References for Sheppard
    • Edinburgh 56 (1935-36), 279-282.

  180. References for Scot
    • J Wood Brown, An inquiry into the Life and Legend of Michael Scot (Edinburgh 1897).

  181. References for Hamilton William
    • J Veitch, Sir William Hamilton (Edinburgh, 1869).

  182. References for Miller John
    • W Arthur, John Miller obituary, Edinburgh Mathematical Notes 41 (1957) 41 .

  183. References for Keldysh Mstislav
    • FRSE, Royal Society of Edinburgh Yearbook (1979), 46-47.

  184. References for Watson William
    • J C Smail, William Watson, M.A., B.Sc., F.H.-W.C., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1953, 50-52.

  185. References for Smeal
    • Biographical Index of Staff and Alumni (University of Edinburgh).

  186. References for Ferguson
    • Edinburgh 33 (1912-13), 342-345.

  187. References for Frechet
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1973-74 (1975), 31-33.

  188. References for McWhan
    • R A Houstoun, John McWhan, M.A., Ph.D., Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1944, 24.

  189. References for Dirac
    • P Higgs, Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1985-86 (1987), 49-51.

  190. References for Pinkerton
    • Edinburgh Math.

  191. References for Born
    • Obituary, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1969-71 (1971-2), 23-26.

  192. References for Hodge
    • William Vallance Douglas Hodge, Yearbook of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Session 1974-75 (1976), 47-52.

  193. References for Gregory David
    • A G Stewart, The Academic Gregories (Edinburgh, 1901).

  194. References for Horsburgh
    • Edinburgh Math.

  195. References for Birkhoff
    • I M H Etherington, Obituary: George David Birkhoff, Edinburgh Math.


Additional material

  1. Lawson: Merchiston Castle
    • On Monday 1 August 1938 a letter by George Lawson, President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, concerning Merchiston Castle was published in The Scotsman.
    • 49 Merchiston Crescent, Edinburgh, .
    • (1) "Cordial welcome to decision" (on Scottish administration); "Lively Satisfaction in Edinburgh and Scotland generally." These are quotations from The Scotsman of July 29; signs of a stirring of Scottish nation-consciousness.
    • And observe sir, not in Scotland first, and Edinburgh in particular; no but in Edinburgh first and then "Scotland generally." That is as it should be if Edinburgh worthily times the beat of Scotland's heart.
    • (2) Over against this patriotic aliveness, thus skilfully and correctly presented as spreading from Edinburgh, place in contrast this other deadness - deadness is a fit word for it - a deadness in Edinburgh obviously but not - and I can prove it - not in "Scotland generally." In support of my accusation of deadness against Edinburgh refer to The Scotsman of July 26.
    • There, in an account of an Edinburgh Town Council meeting we read of "the old Merchiston Castle School." An accurate enough historical reference certainly; but in a Scotland beginning to take a pride in Scottish achievement and supposed to be led therein by the capital city of Edinburgh, is Merchiston Castle School all that Edinburgh can bring to mind about Merchiston Castle? Has Edinburgh forgotten or does Edinburgh prefer to forget, that Merchiston Castle was the birthplace and home of the Scottish Mathematical genius, Napier of Merchiston, whose invention of the "mirifici logarithmorum canonis" brought world fame? .
    • (4) About the thus acknowledged detriment the Lord Provost with his experience can speak with more authority perhaps than any other person in Edinburgh, and he speaks with an inviting sympathy; but my appeal to him, and with him to the Council and to Edinburgh Scots, is not an appeal from the side of merely material values.
    • Of course, Edinburgh Town Council, by force of its bare majority, can decide that this is the kind of thing that Scottish national pride, in the Lord Provost's words, "has to put up with" from Edinburgh, Scotland's capital.
    • (5) In paragraph (2) I undertook to prove that this deadness to Scottish national feeling while obvious in Edinburgh Town Council, is not to be found In "Scotland generally." Scotland in more spiritual things does not, perhaps, always accept Edinburgh's lead.
    • (6) The celebration of the tercentenary of the Scottish mathematician, Gregory, began in the Royal Society of Edinburgh in the afternoon of July 4, was continued at St Andrews University in a graduation ceremonial and reception on July 5, and was further continued for ten days by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in a Mathematical Colloquium, over which I had the honour to preside, in the University Hall at St Andrews.
    • Lectures were given, not only by Professor Turnbull of St Andrews on his six-years research into Gregory's unpublished papers, but also by professors from the Sorbonne, from Denmark, from Harvard, and from Edinburgh University.
    • Something of a contrast - isn't it? - with Edinburgh Town Council's treatment of Napier.
    • Startling isn't it? - to hear of a University Chair in honour of Napier at St Andrews and a "remand home" in his dishonour, as the Lord Provost would say, at Edinburgh.
    • And this is what Sir Peter thought of Napier, a University Chair in his honour; not like Edinburgh Town Council, who count a "remand home" good enough.
    • President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • 8 Merchiston Crescent, Edinburgh, .
    • Surely that is not the desire of the Edinburgh Corporation.
    • The value of Merchiston Castle as an asset to Edinburgh does not seem to interest the Corporation.
    • It was proposed to make the castle into a detention home; fortunately that project failed to materialise and so it was saved from this ignoble purpose and the citizens of Edinburgh from the deserved scorn of the civilised world.
    • John Napier of Merchiston, a citizen of Edinburgh, is one of the greatest of the many great men Scotland has produced.

  2. Scotland in 1883 and the EMS
    • Scotland in 1883 and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • In 1883 there were four universities in Scotland: the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow and St Andrews.
    • We also see which of these students became involved in the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • One of the students graduating in 1881 was Alexander Yule Fraser, who was a Boxill Mathematical Prizeman, and went on to become a mathematics master at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, and was one of the three signatories of the letter proposing to set up the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Another graduating in the same year was John Jack who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society November 1895 when Professor of Mathematics at Wilson College, Bombay.
    • W Cooper Dickson, one of the First Class students of 1882 was a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in February 1883 while training for ministry in the Church.
    • Edinburgh .
    • At Edinburgh George Chrystal is the professor of mathematics in 1883.
    • In 1882 one student graduated from Edinburgh with an M.A.
    • with Honours in Mathematics, namely R Edgar Allardice who graduated First Class in 1882, joined Edinburgh Mathematical Society as a founder member in February 1883, and became Assistant to the Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh.
    • In the following year of 1883 three students graduated from Edinburgh with an M.A.
    • Two, who were both awarded First Class degrees, became members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • One of the First Class students was Robert Franklin Muirhead who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1884.
    • Of the Second Class students, one was James Hamilton, who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in April 1885 when a Mathematical Master at Kensington Grammar School, London.
    • He was John Weir who was awarded First Class Honours and joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1884 when at St Peter's College, Cambridge.
    • At St Andrews the Regius Professor of Mathematics in 1883 is R P Scott Lang who was appointed in 1879 to replace George Chrystal who, after two years as Regius Professor had moved to Edinburgh.
    • One of these students was R C Buist, who joined Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1884.
    • One of these students was David Rintoul who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society as a founder member in February 1883 when he was at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.
    • Mathematics in Edinburgh University in 1883 .
    • In 1883 the University of Edinburgh had an "Ordinary Certificate in Arts for Women" and an "Honour Certificate in Arts for Women".
    • Candidates, before they can receive the certificates, must have studied in at least three of the Classes of the "Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women," that are recognised by the Senatus Academicus; and they must also have passed the Local Examinations of the University of Edinburgh, or of one of the other Scottish Universities, or of the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge.
    • classes of the University of Edinburgh in 1896.
    • was popular since by 1885 the centres were Aberdeen, Barbados, Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Cheltenham, Edinburgh, Eisenach, Halifax, Hildesheim, Leicester, Lerwick, Liverpool, London, Paris, Pietermaritzburg, and St Andrews.

  3. Edinburgh's tribute to A C Aitken
    • Edinburgh's tribute to A C Aitken .
    • A C Aitken retired from the chair of mathematics at the University of Edinburgh on 30 September 1965.
    • In 1923 he came to Edinburgh to study for a Ph.D.
    • Aitken was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh when he was only 30 and maintained an active interest in the Society throughout his career, publishing much of his original work in its Proceedings.
    • Edinburgh has always had a great attraction for him and he has resisted the many offers tempting him to go elsewhere.
    • Mathematicians of the future have the written evidence on which to appreciate his contributions to science, and to say how fortunate Edinburgh has been to have him.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Edinburgh_Aitken_tribute.html .

  4. Etherington papers
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • I M H Etherington, A simple method of finding sums of powers of the natural numbers, Edinburgh Math.
    • I M H Etherington, Pictorial relativity, Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh.
    • I, Edinburgh Math.
    • II, Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • I M H Etherington, Obituary: George David Birkhoff, Edinburgh Math.
    • I M H Etherington, Obituary: John Watt Butters, Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  5. Edinburgh Mathematics Examinations
    • University of Edinburgh Mathematics Examinations 1882-83 .
    • Honours degree in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh.
    • Honours degree in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Edinburgh_m_exams.html .

  6. Edinburgh Physics Examinations
    • University of Edinburgh Natural Philosophy Examinations 1882-83 .
    • Pass degree in Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Edinburgh_p_exams.html .

  7. Centenary of John Leslie
    • It is taken from the University of Edinburgh Journal (Summer 1933), 215-222.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society celebrated the fame of Sir John Leslie at its opening meeting held in the Mathematical Institute of Edinburgh University on 4th November 1932.
    • Medical students were questioned in Latin in their degree examinations in Edinburgh even during the first quarter of the nineteenth century.
    • After six sessions at St Andrews he removed to Edinburgh University, where he studied for three years.
    • At the age of twenty-two years he published in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh his first paper, on the "Resolution of Indeterminate Problems." .
    • In 1805, at the age of 39, he was first favourite for the Professorship of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, when his friend Professor Playfair was translated to the chair of Natural Philosophy.
    • The rival candidate, a minister, Dr Thomas Macknight, was little known to fame, but was backed strongly by the ministers of the Edinburgh Presbytery, who were suspected of endeavouring to secure a monopoly of the Philosophic chairs, and who now accused Leslie of atheism because of a note in his work on heat.
    • Leslie had dared to speak of Hume with approval, stating that he was the first to treat of causation (cause and effect) in a truly philosophical manner, and had remarked that "the unsophisticated notions of mankind are in perfect unison with the deductions of logic, and imply nothing more at bottom in the relation of cause and effect than a constant and invariable sequence." On this the Edinburgh Presbytery charged him with "having laid a foundation for rejecting all the argument that is derived from the works of God, to prove either His Being, or His Attributes." The protest which was tendered by the ministers to the patrons of the chair, then the Provost and Town Council, stated that they were obliged by charter to act with the advice of the ministers.
    • Between 1815 and 1824 he wrote largely for the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and also for the famous Edinburgh Review and for many other journals.
    • These pamphlets included the "Progress of Mathematical and Physical Science during the Eighteenth Century," and various contributions to the Edinburgh Philosophical journal - astronomical, meteorological, and physical.
    • The nephew of Sir John Leslie was the founder of the well-known Edinburgh firm of civil engineers, Leslie and Reid, which, among its activities, has given to Edinburgh a water supply second to none in the world.
    • He was too striking a figure to escape cruel caricature among the Edinburgh worthies.
    • An account of Leslie's works will be found among the Notes of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for the current year.

  8. Mathematics in Edinburgh
    • Mathematics in Edinburgh University in 1883 .
    • In 1883 the University of Edinburgh had an "Ordinary Certificate in Arts for Women" and an "Honour Certificate in Arts for Women".
    • Candidates, before they can receive the certificates, must have studied in at least three of the Classes of the "Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women," that are recognised by the Senatus Academicus; and they must also have passed the Local Examinations of the University of Edinburgh, or of one of the other Scottish Universities, or of the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge.
    • Here are some examination questions set at Edinburgh University in Mathematics and in Natural Philosophy.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Edinburgh_maths.html .

  9. Napier Tercentenary
    • On July 24th to 27th, 1914, there will be held a celebration, under the auspices of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, of the tercentenary of the publication of Napier's Mirifici Logarithmorum Canonis Descriptio, the work which embodies the discovery of logarithms.
    • Immediately following the Napier celebration, a Mathematical colloquium will be held on July 28th to 31st under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • of Scotland raised a loan of money from Alexander Napier, who was the Provost of Edinburgh in 1437, and had pledged the lands of Merchiston, originally part of the Crown demesne, in mortgage for the repayment of the loan.
    • Mr J Parker Smith and Mrs Parker Smith; Professor D'Arcy Thomson, Dundee; Professor Thomas, Charleston, U.S.A.; Professor S Tscherny, Warsaw: Professor Westergaard, Edinburgh; and Professor Whittaker, Edinburgh.
    • The talks of Monday 27 July, together with a report on the social programme and the forthcoming Colloquium organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society were reported by The Scotsman on Tuesday 28 July 1914.
    • CLOSING MEETINGS IN EDINBURGH.
    • The members of the Napier Tercentenary Congress met again in Edinburgh University yesterday forenoon.
    • RECEPTION BY THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH.
    • A farewell reception was given to the members of the Napier Tercentenary Congress by the President and Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in the rooms of the Society, George Street, yesterday afternoon, and was largely attended by the ladies and gentlemen who have taken part in the celebration.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL COLLOQUIUM.
    • The success attending the Colloquium held under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society last year encouraged the Society to hold a similar meeting this year.
    • By the courtesy of the Edinburgh University Court, the meetings will be held in the Mathematical Department of the University, and will last from today till Friday.

  10. Chrystal: EMS Address
    • Chrystal addresses the first Edinburgh Mathematical Society meeting .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 and the preliminary meeting of the Society was held in the Mathematics Class Room, Edinburgh University, on Friday, 2nd February 1883, at 8 p.m.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY.
    • THE EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY.
    • At the first ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, held last night in the Mathematical Class-room of the University, Professor Chrystal delivered an address on the present fields of mathematical research.
    • So clamant did that want appear to him to be that for several winters back - more particularly this winter - he had been thinking of trying to start something in Edinburgh in the nature of a mathematical seminary.

  11. Science at St Andrews
    • Herbert Westren Turnbull, Regius Professor of Mathematics at the University of St Andrews, wrote an article Men of Science: General in James B Salmond (ed.), Veterum Laudes (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1950), 108-119.
    • The work was carried out in the seclusion of Merchiston, Napier's baronial home near Edinburgh, from 1594 to 1614.
    • James Gregory was the greatest in a family who for 200 years had occupied university Chairs upon twenty-two occasions, representing mathematics, medicine, chemistry, history and philosophy at St Andrews, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Oxford.
    • On leaving St Andrews, James Gregory went to Edinburgh as her earliest mathematical professor, to be succeeded a year later, after his untimely death at the height of his powers, by his nephew, David, who subsequently in 1692 went to Oxford at the recommendation of Isaac Newton.
    • Meanwhile, James, a younger brother of David, was appointed at the age of twenty to the Chair of Philosophy at St Andrews (1685-91), but succeeded to the vacancy in Edinburgh where he remained as mathematician till 1725.
    • Happily the rough notes on which the work was based have been preserved: they are written on the blank spaces of the letters he received, usually on those from Collins, but in this case on a letter from Gideon Shaw, a bookseller in Edinburgh who supplied him with paper from Holland: and paper was scarce.
    • But the scheme collapsed: and in 1674 Gregory accepted a call to the Chair of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh.
    • These, and many other discouragements, oblige me to accept a call here to the College of Edinburgh, where my salary is nearly double, and my encouragement otherwise much greater." .
    • A small book on practical mathematics in manuscript at the University Library bears the name of James Gregory, Professor of Mathematics in St Andrews, and the date 1696, which is puzzling, because James the nephew occupied the Chair in Edinburgh at that time.
    • After studying in Edinburgh and Leyden, he settled down to practise at St Andrews.
    • John Leslie (1766-1832), a native of Largo and a student at St Andrews, became Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh also claimed James Playfair (1748-1819) of Benvie near Dundee, who was a student at 14 years of age under Wilkie and Gregory, and became a notable mathematician and geologist.

  12. Colin Maclaurin
    • The following paper by Robin Schlapp, published in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes, was based on a talk he gave to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society on 6 December 1946.
    • About this time, James Gregory, of the Edinburgh Chair, was in failing health, and the question of a successor soon narrowed itself to a choice between Maclaurin and "a gentleman eminent for mathematical abilities, who had good interest with the patrons of the University" whose name history does not relate.
    • "I am very glad to hear," he says, "that you have a prospect of being joined to Mr James Gregory in the Professorship of the mathematics at Edinburgh, not only because you are my friend, but principally because of your abilities, you being acquainted as well with the new improvements of mathematics, as with the former state of those sciences.
    • I heartily wish you good success, and shall be very glad of hearing of your being elected; I am, with all sincerity, your faithful friend and most humble servant, I Newton." The second letter was addressed to the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, without Maclaurin's knowledge; in it he says "I am glad to understand that Mr Maclaurin is in good repute amongst you for his skill in mathematics, for I think he deserves it very well; and to satisfy you that I do not flatter him, and also to encourage him to accept the place of assisting Mr Gregory, in order to succeed him, I am ready (if you please to give me leave) to contribute twenty pounds per annum towards a provision for him, till Mr Gregory's place become void, if I live so long, and I will pay it to his order in London." This generous offer was declined, but Maclaurin was appointed, Marischal College being left to discover their loss "by the public newsprints." .
    • In Edinburgh Maclaurin seems to have taken his teaching duties seriously, perhaps to make amends for his neglect of them at Aberdeen.
    • Edinburgh of Maclaurin's time still wore the aspect of a mediaeval city, encompassed by the Flodden Wall.
    • He was a prominent member of several of the societies of the day from which the Royal Society of Edinburgh later developed.
    • When the Jacobites, towards the end of August 1745, got to the southward of the Government forces under Sir John Cope at Dalwhinnie, Maclaurin, always a staunch Whig, seems to have been among the first to realise the danger to Edinburgh.
    • Sabbath night they marched to Winchburgh 3 or 4 miles from Lithgow the Irish Dragowns Generall Hameton and Collonell Gardeners regements marched in towards Edinburgh.
    • At York he found in Archbishop Herring a host only too glad to give him sanctuary, and there, in his own poignant words, he lived "as happily as a man can do, who is ignorant of the state of his family, and who sees the ruin of his country." Soon however he judged it safe to return, and by December was back in Edinburgh.

  13. Groups St Andrews proceedings
    • A companion volume to this book, published as a part of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, contains articles based on two of the one-hour invited lectures and a number of articles based on some of the research seminars.
    • Groups - St Andrews 1985 received financial support from the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society and the British Council.
    • We gratefully acknowledge this financial support and would like to thank the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical society for their help with publishing.
    • Our final thanks go to the authors who have contributed articles both to this volume and to the companion part in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Groups - St Andrews 1989 received financial support from the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society and the British Council.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society provided financial help which defrayed the main speakers' travel, registration and accommodation expenses.
    • We also acknowledge with gratitude the financial support of the Edinburgh and London Mathematical Societies.
    • Once again, we believe that the support of the two main British mathematics societies, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society has been an important factor in the success of these conferences.
    • Once again, we believe that the support of the two main British mathematics societies, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society has been an important factor in the success of these conferences.
    • The support of the two main United Kingdom mathematics societies, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society has, once again, been an important factor in the success of these conferences.

  14. Edinburgh Mathematical Notes
    • /ems/Edinburgh_math_notes.

  15. Gibson History 9 - Colin Maclaurin
    • During the early years of his residence at Leadhills Stirling found congenial companionship in Colin Maclaurin who was then Professor of Mathematics in Edinburgh University, and to Mr Tweedie we are indebted for a study of Maclaurin's researches that has thrown new light on their importance for the development of geometry, and gives us some insight into his many-sided activities.
    • It was a happy circumstance however that he was freed from the difficulties of the position by his appointment in 1725, on the recommendation of Newton, to the Chair of Mathematics in Edinburgh University.
    • All the accounts that have been handed down of Maclaurin's work in Edinburgh show him to have been a man of lofty ideals and generous outlook, combined with untiring energy and business capacity.
    • His devotion to the general interests of the city was specially manifested during the "forty-five," but his efforts to stimulate the civic authorities to put Edinburgh in a state of defence were unsuccessful, and he had to leave the city.
    • He found a refuge with Dr Herring, Archbishop of York, but his health, never robust, was so much impaired by the hardships he encountered in his flight that he returned to Edinburgh to die.
    • The original contributions made by Maclaurin during the twenty years of his Edinburgh professorship are not numerous though they are valuable, but his work as a teacher and administrator had a far-reaching influence on the position of mathematics as an essential element in general culture, and the fact that he took such pains with his classes in preparing suitable courses seems to me to indicate that he was alive to the importance of this aspect of his work.
    • In 1731 a Society had been formed in Edinburgh for the promotion of medical knowledge by collecting and publishing Essays on medical subjects, and had proved its value by the volumes it produced in a few years.
    • In 1739, Maclaurin was instrumental in broadening the scope of the Society by the inclusion of Philosophy and Literature; the Society was remodelled, a set of laws and regulations was drawn up, the number of members increased and the title of "The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh" adopted, Maclaurin being one of the Secretaries.
    • After Maclaurin's death, the Society continued in existence though the spark of life was nearly extinguished when, largely owing to the action of Principal Robertson, it was again remodelled and in 1783 took the form of "The Royal Society of Edinburgh." The important part that The Royal Society has played in the development of scientific knowledge in Scotland is too well known to be insisted upon, but it is pleasant to remember that the foundation of the Society is so, directly associated with the activities of Colin Maclaurin.

  16. The Tercentenary of the birth of James Gregory
    • Congratulatory addresses were presented to the University by delegates from the Royal Society of London, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the University of Edinburgh, the London Mathematical Society, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and from Professor Volterra.
    • We can picture him laying plans for his observatory, gaining the confidence and friendship of men of goodwill who provided means for gathering the necessary instruments; his occasional journey to Edinburgh or London or homewards to the north: the famous occasion when he persuaded his townsfolk to hold a church door collection throughout Aberdeen to supply instruments for the observatory at St Andrews! Here stands his own pendulum clock, made by Joseph Knibb of London, with its large dial curiously divided into 60 parts for the seconds, a reminder that, only a few years before, Huygens had discovered the secret of the pendulum.
    • Although Gregory withheld the actual method he sent the results to Collins in a letter dated the 15th of February 1671: but by wonderful fortune the actual rough notes which led to these results are here upon the blank sheets of a letter written on the 30th of January by one Gideon Shaw, a bookseller who lived at the foot of the Ladies' Steps, Edinburgh.
    • Whether Gregory ever worked in it we do not know: probably he left St Andrews for his Edinburgh Chair before the project was fulfilled.
    • These, and many other discouragements, obliged me to accept a call here to the College of Edinburgh, where my salary is nearly double, and my encouragements otherwise much greater." .
    • The old letters, upon the backs of which he wrote his rough notes during the seven years spent at St Andrews and Edinburgh, passed into the possession of his family, and were carefully treasured: but after many years they were lost to be found again by Sir Peter Scott Lang in 1887, a successor two centuries later in the Chair of James Gregory, who bequeathed them to this Library about ten years ago.

  17. Gibson History 12 - Minor figures, Arithmetic Books
    • Edinburgh: 1794.
    • Edinburgh, 1741.
    • It ran through several editions, the first (which I have not seen) being published at Edinburgh in 1777.
    • The copy I possess is a later edition, "new-modelled and adapted to the improved methods and information of the present time." By Elias Johnston, Teacher of Mathematics in Edinburgh.
    • The Elements of Conic Sections, by Richard Jack, Teacher of Mathematicks in Edinburgh (Edinburgh: 1742) owes a good deal to Simson's Conics.
    • A separate book on Trigonometry, with the title Elements of Trigonometry, plane and spherical; with the Principles of Perspective and Projection of the Sphere, by John Wright, was published at Edinburgh in 1772.
    • Davidson was a teacher in Burntisland, Ingram and Ewing in Edinburgh; I think Davidson was a schoolmaster, but Ingram and Ewing "private teachers," of whom there seem to have been a considerable number in the University towns.

  18. Turnbull lectures on Colin Maclaurin
    • He had in fact during the previous November removed to the University of Edinburgh to deputise for James Gregory who was an old man and no longer capable of teaching.
    • Long ago Newton had recommended David to the Chair of Mathematics at Edinburgh: now he did the same for Maclaurin.
    • and also a letter to the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, in which he proposed Maclaurin as the eventual successor of Gregory and was: .
    • For twenty years Maclaurin occupied the Chair at Edinburgh with distinction.
    • In 1739 a perusal of the volumes published by the Medical Society of Edinburgh eight years previously prompted Maclaurin to extend its usefulness to include physics and antiquities.
    • It was this enlarged society that eventually became the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • In 1745, when Prince Charles Stuart raised a Highland army to dispute the Hanoverian succession and marched on Edinburgh, Maclaurin took the leading part in rallying the townsfolk and organising the defences of the city against the rebel troops.
    • He returned the next year to Edinburgh where he resumed his duties, hoping to complete the considerable volume that he had undertaken on the Newtonian philosophy.

  19. Whittaker RSE Prize
    • E T Whittaker was awarded the Gunning Victoria Jubilee Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh on Monday 1 July 1929.
    • Edinburgh's position in the field of Mathematical science was referred to yesterday when the Gunning Victoria Jubilee Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh was presented to Professor E T Whittaker, F.R.S., of the Chair of Mathematics in Edinburgh University.
    • One of them was that both in their own Proceedings and in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, there had been, in recent years, a very marked tendency on the part of non-Scottish mathematicians to send in papers with a view to publication.
    • There had also been a very considerable demand, on the part of the libraries of Europe and south of the Tweed and of America, for the publications of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  20. EMS Rutherford
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of D E Rutherford .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the second ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held on Friday 11 November 1966: .

  21. Students in 1711
    • Laird of Delvine, lived in Edinburgh and employed a governor/tutor, James Morice, to educate the twins.
    • They travelled with their older brother Alexander who had already begun a course at St Andrews but he left in October 1713 to study law at Edinburgh University.
    • Edinburgh .
    • Edinburgh .
    • For Master John Mackenzie of Delvin at Edinburgh .
    • To Master John Mackenzie of Delvin at Edinburgh .
    • I desire to know with your convenience after your return to Edinburgh whether we are to get the use of your globes; that I may know how to direct my pupils after they have read over Ozanam's fortifications.

  22. Young Researchers
    • Speaker: Michael Atiyah, University of Edinburgh .
    • Speaker: Jose Figueroa-O'Farrill, University of Edinburgh .
    • Location: University of Edinburgh .
    • Speaker: Michael Atiyah, University of Edinburgh .
    • Speaker: Tom Leinster, University of Edinburgh .
    • Speaker: James Wright, University of Edinburgh .
    • Speaker: Kousha Etessami, University of Edinburgh .

  23. Gibson History 6 - More Gregorys
    • After James Gregory's death the Chair of Mathematics in Edinburgh remained vacant for some years, the work being carried on meantime by a lecturer called John Young, but on 29th October 1683, his nephew, David Gregory, was appointed Professor.
    • David Gregory was born in 1661, was educated at the Grammar School of Aberdeen and studied for a time at Marischal College, but came to Edinburgh to complete his College training.
    • In 1692 he left Edinburgh to take up the position of Savilian Professor of Astronomy at Oxford.
    • In this sketch I can deal only with Gregory's work when at Edinburgh.
    • A manuscript in Latin of a course on Practical Geometry was left in Edinburgh and was used by his successor in class teaching.
    • He graduated at Edinburgh in 1685, was Professor of Philosophy at St Andrews from 1685 to 1692 and was in that year appointed by the Town Council of Edinburgh to be Professor of Mathematics.

  24. Macdonald Endowments
    • Hector M Macdonald addressed the jubilee dinner of the Aberdeen University Edinburgh Association on Friday 2 February 1934.
    • The activities of the Educational Endowments Commission were criticised at the jubilee dinner of the Aberdeen University Edinburgh Association last night by Professor Hector M Macdonald, F.R.S., LL.D., of the Chair of Mathematics in the University of Aberdeen, who was the principal guest.
    • The Association was founded in Edinburgh in November 1883.
    • Since then the Association has held a dinner in Edinburgh each year on the first Friday in February, the old Bursary Night, when the bursaries parable by the University used to be distributed in cash to the students.
    • Sir William Chree, K.C., LL.D., Dean of the Faculty of Advocates, and Mr W M Maclachlan, W.S., both of Edinburgh, were present at the inauguration of the Association in 1885, and have attended all the dinners since with the exception of one break in Sir William's case, and two breaks in Mr Maclachlan's case.
    • At last night's jubilee dinner, held in the Caledonian Hotel, Edinburgh, Sir William was in the chair, and Mr Maclachlan was joint croupier.
    • The giving of non-competitive bursaries by Local Authorities was criticised by Professor H J C Grierson, IXJD., when he proposed "Sister Universities." That practice had, he said, led to the sending to Edinburgh University of some of the worst people they had ever had.

  25. Burgess plaque
    • Mr M'Kechnie, who was introduced by Mr Munro, recalled that Dr Burgess first had a short spell at Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh, and after five years as Mathematical master and second master in Rothesay Academy, he returned to Edinburgh in 1890 to work in the Mathematical department of the Edinburgh Ladies' College.
    • During his 17 years stay in Edinburgh, Dr Burgess did not limit his activities to the school.
    • He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and he took a leading part in the work of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, of which he became secretary and then president.
    • He was also president of the first Mathematical Colloquium, which was held in Edinburgh some 20 years ago.

  26. Gibson History 4 - John Napier
    • John Napier was born in 1550 at Merchiston Castle, near Edinburgh.
    • He died on the 4th of April 1617, and was buried, it is fairly certain, in the old church of the parish of St Cuthbert's, Edinburgh - the church in which he was an elder.
    • Of the Rabdologia (Edinburgh: Andrew Hart, 1617) and the De Arte Logistica, which only appeared in 1839, I shall say nothing except that in the former the construction and use of the "numbering rods," usually called "Napier's Bones," are fully described.
    • (Edinburgh: Andrew Hart, 1614).
    • (Edinburgh; Andrew Hart, 1619).
    • In the summer of 1615, he journeyed to Edinburgh and stayed with Napier for a month when the proposed change was discussed.

  27. The Dundee Numerical Analysis Conferences
    • Following spells as Lecturer at the University of Reading and also at Imperial College, he was appointed Assistant Director of the newly founded Computer Unit of the University of Edinburgh in 1963, with Sidney Michaelson as Director.
    • I joined the Computer Unit in October 1964 as a Demonstrator, having just graduated from the University of Edinburgh with a degree in Mathematical Sciences.
    • But after my graduation ceremony in Edinburgh in July 1964, I was passing some time with a class mate, Alex Wight, who had a summer job in the Computer Unit, and he suggested I go round to see the place.
    • However, the idea of remaining in Edinburgh had some appeal, the salary was the same as I was getting from ICI, and there was also an opportunity to study for an MSc.
    • Around that time, John Todd and Olga Tausky from California Institute of Technology were visiting Arthur Erdelyi in the Mathematics Department in Edinburgh, and E T Copson in St Andrews invited John Todd over there to give a talk.
    • Jack Lambert moved to Aberdeen and Mike Osborne left Edinburgh for Australia at the end of 1965.

  28. Mathematics at Aberdeen 3
    • Failure to publish the latter for some ten years was to lead to a very acrimonious dispute over priority with an Edinburgh mathematics teacher, Brakenridge, who was also working independently on pivots and linear guides.
    • By November of the same year he was in Edinburgh, appointed conjunct professor with the ageing James Gregory, a post negotiated for him by Newton who had offered to pay twenty pounds a year towards his salary.
    • Maclaurin held the chair in Edinburgh for twenty years, gaining a reputation as an able teacher with a wide interest in practical science and public affairs.
    • He took a leading part in organizing the defences of Edinburgh against the Jacobites in 1745.
    • He died in Edinburgh on 14 June 1746 shortly after his return home, and was buried in Greyfriars churchyard.
    • The runners up, with 119 and 90 respectively, were Robert Hamilton, who joined the staff later and John Playfair, afterwards professor at Edinburgh.

  29. J M Whittaker Chair
    • Dr Whittaker, who graduated at the Edinburgh University with first class honours in mathematics and natural philosophy, was a lecturer at that University from 1927 to 1929, and later was awarded a Fellowship and appointed to a lectureship in Pembroke College, Cambridge.
    • Dr Whittaker, who was born in 1905, and is a son of Professor E T Whittaker, F.R.S., of the Chair of Mathematics in Edinburgh University, was educated at Fettes College, Edinburgh University, and Cambridge.
    • At Edinburgh in the years 1920-24 he was one of a group of students who have already made their mark in the academic world, such as J Williamson, now Professor of Mathematics in Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore; J Wishart, now Reader in Statistics in Cambridge University; and W V D Hodge, now Fellow of St John's College and University lecturer in mathematics at Cambridge.
    • He has published a number of original papers in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the London Mathematical Society, and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  30. Muir on research in Scotland
    • Thomas Muir was the second president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, being elected in 1883, the year in which the Society was founded.
    • Eventually the address appeared as an addendum to the second part of the Proceeding of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • (An Address delivered before the Mathematical Society of Edinburgh, 8th February, 1884.) .
    • As I cannot afford the time now to recast it, I print it with some hesitation exactly in the form in which it was read, hoping merely that it may find readers as indulgent as the Edinburgh audience for which it was prepared.
    • Books containing original work in pure Mathematics are now rare in almost any country; in Scotland, however, their number is practically nil: of journals, we have none: and our only society to be honourably mentioned as publishing memoirs and shorter communications on the subject of Mathematics is the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Of this there can be no reasonable doubt, because we know that under the present imperfect arrangements quite a number of positions such as these have recently been secured by graduates whose whole University education had been obtained in Edinburgh.

  31. Whittaker retires EMA
    • Professor E T Whittaker of the University of Edinburgh, retired today from the office of President of the Mathematical Association which he has held for two years, and is succeeded by the Rev.
    • At the annual meeting of the Association today the announcement was made that it is proposed to hold the summer meeting of the Association at Edinburgh, from September 7 to September 11, during the session of the British Association.
    • Professor Whittaker hopes that the Edinburgh Mathematical Society will decide to hold its meetings at the same time, and he intends to show the visitors the mathematical laboratory of the University.
    • In this respect Professor Whittaker cited the work carried out by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a body largely composed of schoolmasters.
    • He recalled with evident pleasure a crowded meeting which he addressed in the High School at Edinburgh in pursuit of his reforming zeal.

  32. Charles Tweedie's subscribers
    • John Alison, M.A., LL D., Headmaster of George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh University.
    • E T Whittaker, D.Sc., F.R.S., Professor of Mathematics, Edinburgh University.
    • Archibald Campbell, M.A., LL.B., Writer to the Signet, 36 Castle Street, Edinburgh.
    • Alexander Morgan, M.A., D.Sc., Director of Studies, Edinburgh Provincial Training Centre.

  33. 21st Century mathematics
    • The article was in anticipation of the fourth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics which was help in Edinburgh later in the summer of 1999.
    • This joint effort of over 20 scientific societies around the world is to be held in Edinburgh on 5-9 July.
    • Its organisation, led by Sir Michael Atiyah, is supported by the mathematical community in the UK, involving chiefly Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt universities, the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Edinburgh, Maxwell's birthplace.
    • New statistical methods are being presented in Edinburgh with applications both to basic physics research and to industrial problems.

  34. D'Arcy Thompson by David Burt
    • David Raitt Robertson Burt, Lecturer in Zoology at the University of St Andrews, wrote about Natural History at the University of St Andrews in James B Salmond (ed.), Veterum Laudes (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1950), 108-119.
    • He was born on 2nd May 1860, the son of D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, previously classical master at the Edinburgh Academy and at that time Professor of Greek in Queen's College, Galway.
    • He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy (1870-77) where he was a member of Clyde's class, in which there were a number of boys who afterwards became famous in science or achieved distinction in other spheres.
    • Like his two predecessors in the United College D'Arcy Thompson was a student at the University of Edinburgh.
    • He went from Edinburgh to Cambridge where he studied under F M Balfour and Michael Foster, and after graduating he taught physiology for a year under the latter.

  35. Madras College exams
    • Pupils at Madras College, St Andrews, were examined each August by professors from the universities of Edinburgh, St Andrews and others.
    • Note that in 1846 both the Professor of Mathematics of the University of Edinburgh, Philip Kelland, and the Regius Professor of Mathematics of the University of St Andrews, Thomas Duncan, were examiners.
    • The Trustees of Dr Bell, the founder, presided on the occasion, and were assisted throughout by Professors Dunbar, Pillans and Kelland, of the University of Edinburgh.
    • There were also present in the course of the proceedings a good many other gentlemen professionally concerned in education, particularly Professors Duncan, Jackson, Reid, Connell, Spalding, and Ferrier, of St Andrews; Professor Martin of Aberdeen; Mr Lees of Edinburgh; Mr Miller of the Perth Academy; and Dr Hunter of the Academy at Ayr.
    • Dr Woodford had adopted a modification of the monitorial system, which appeared to him so ingeniously devised and so effectual that he felt assured he would adopt it himself if he were again a teacher in the High School of Edinburgh.

  36. Hille publications
    • Edinburgh 71 (2) (1972), 95-110.
    • Edinburgh 72 (1) (1972), 17-37.
    • Edinburgh 72 (4) (1973), 331- 336.
    • Edinburgh A 84 (3-4) (1979), 283-307.
    • Edinburgh 86 (1-2) (1980), 85-101.

  37. Gregory-Collins correspondence
    • I am now following out, in my public lectures, a full course of mathematics, which, if I publish, either altogether or in part, I will add to it what else of my own I think worthy of public view, and print it in Edinburgh.
    • I had ere this sent you Slusius, but I am informed the carrier goes no further than to Newcastle upon Tyne, where the books may lie long enough, unless sent to an acquaintance that may pay the carriage there and take care to send them to Edinburgh.
    • In the summer of 1674 Gregory went to Edinburgh to become Professor of Mathematics there.
    • In a letter he wrote on 13 July 1675, Gregory explained his reasons for accepting the position in Edinburgh: .
    • These and many other discouragements obliged me to accept a call here to the College of Edinburgh where my salary is near double and my encouragements otherwise much greater.

  38. Copson Professor
    • He was a scholar of St John's College, Oxford, from 1919 to 1922, and gained First Class Honours in Mathematical Moderations (1920) and Final Honour School of Mathematics (1922.) From 1922 to 1929 he held a lectureship in mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, during which time he graduated D.Sc., and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • In 1942 he received the Keith Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh for his researches in mathematics.
    • He left Edinburgh in 1929 to become Lecturer in Mathematics in the United College, St Andrews, where he remained until 1934 when he was appointed Assistant Professor in the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.
    • He has been a member of the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh since 1943, and has been one of its secretaries since 1945.

  39. John Williamson papers
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  40. James Gregory's manuscripts
    • It now appears, from a study of three unpublished manuscripts of James Gregory, which have found their way respectively to the libraries of the universities of Edinburgh and St Andrews and that of the Royal Society at Burlington House, that the subject attracted the serious attention of Gregory, especially during the last six months of his life.
    • In the Gregory volume at Edinburgh, which contains a duplicate note in his handwriting, the signs have been corrected, and an additional remark is added, that .
    • These notes on the cubic and biquadratic occur practically in duplicate upon two sheets of foolscap paper, one in the St Andrews manuscript and one in the Edinburgh manuscript, the former occupying the back of a letter from Collins.
    • On the back of the Edinburgh sheet are a few further notes by James Gregory on the connexion between solving quadratics and ruler and compass constructions.

  41. George Chrystal's Third Promoter's Address
    • When Professor George Chrystal took charge of the Chair of Mathematics in University of Edinburgh, every professor in the Faculty of Arts was required to deliver a Promoter's Address to the new graduates of the University.
    • George Chrystal made his third Promoter's Address to graduates of Edinburgh University on 11 April 1908.
    • When, therefore, movements arose within the universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh five years ago in favour of an extension of university study over a longer portion of the year, and for a more concentrated curriculum of five degree subjects, free from more of the irksome compulsions of the curriculum with which you are familiar, it was speedily recognised by the more thoughtful in the academic world that these things were inevitable, because these are the natural consequences of what has gone before.
    • The five years' deliberation and consultation with the other universities has resulted in this, that the universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh have recently presented to the Privy Council new Arts Ordinances, practically identical, which render it possible for each university to carry out, in the way that best suits its own circumstances, one or all of the reforms that are now recognised as necessary.

  42. Mirsky books
    • Edmund's trip to Edinburgh with Mirsky's book.
    • One day I decided to go to Edinburgh and look for other useful books for the courses I was studying.
    • I took the train from St Andrews (at that time the town had a railway station) and I read Mirsky's book on the 90+ minute ride to Edinburgh.
    • When I reached Edinburgh I went straight to Thin's bookshop on the North Bridge, not far from Waverly station.

  43. Education in St Andrews in 1849
    • In Charles Roger's book History of St Andrews: with a full account of the recent improvements in the city (Adam & Charles Black, Edinburgh, 1849) the University, Madras College and other educational establishments in St Andrews in 1849 are described.
    • It was erected from a plan by Mr William Burn, architect, Edinburgh, and finished by Mr Kennedy, builder, St Andrews, at the expense of about £18,000.
    • From his remarkably penurious habits, he amassed the large sum of £120,000, which, near the time of his death, [Dr Bell died on the 27th January, 1832, in his seventy-ninth year, and was interred, in terms of his special request, in Westminster Abbey] he divided into twelve parts, appropriating six of them for schools on the Madras system in London, Edinburgh, Leith, Glasgow, Aberdeen, and Inverness, and another for the moral and religious improvement of St Andrews, and construction of permanent and useful works connected with the town.
    • According to the deed of foundation, all the classes are examined, in presence of the trustees, every quarter; and at the principal examination in the end of July, immediately before the vacation, the usual examinators are assisted by the resident Professors in the University, and by several distinguished Professors from the University of Edinburgh, who are requested to attend.

  44. Founding the Indian Mathematical Society
    • Mr Weir arranged for me to be introduced as a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and I felt very proud.
    • [He became a member in December 1895.] The proceedings of the Society, which I received, gave me my first glimmer of hope that a Mathematical Society like the Edinburgh could, perhaps, be formed in India.
    • [At the time he joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society he was Probationary Deputy Collector in Trichinopoly, India.] .
    • I wanted to form a Mathematical Society which might be something like the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  45. Kerr: 'Technical Education
    • It is in the first place important to remember that in the early years of the 19th century there was in Edinburgh, in Glasgow, and for that matter in every town of note in the country a most vigorous movement for technical education.
    • Edinburgh school-board also is remarkable for its enterprise in establishing classes in millinery, carpentry, cabinet-making, machine-drawing, building-construction, applied art, confectionery, proof-reading, &c.
    • From this point of view Edinburgh with its handsome, commodious, and highly equipped Technical College-the Heriot-Watt; and Glasgow, rejoicing in the magnificence and elaborateness of its huge institute in George Street [The Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College], command enthusiastic admiration and approval.
    • In that report attention is directed to the suggestive fact that the roll of students contains the names of 175 graduates of the Universities of Aberdeen, Berlin, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Ireland (Royal), London, Oxford, St Andrews and Victoria.

  46. Maclaurin life
    • He was hardly settled here, when he received an invitation to Edinburgh; the curators of that University being desirous that he should supply the place of Mr James Gregory, whose great age and infirmities had rendered him incapable of teaching.
    • This work was published at Edinburgh in 1742, 2 vols.
    • In the mean time, he was continually obliging the public with some observation or performance of his own, several of which were published in the 5th and 6th volumes of the Medical Essays at Edinburgh.
    • In 1745, having been very active in fortifying the city of Edinburgh against the rebel army, he was obliged to fly from thence into England, where he was invited by Dr Herring, Archbishop of York, to reside with him during his stay in this country.

  47. Mathematics at Aberdeen 2
    • A committee of representatives of the various universities met in Edinburgh in 1647 to discuss progress.
    • Two months after his appointment he was asking permission to visit Edinburgh to try to get funds for his salary and was away for over a year.
    • The Scottish Parliament at this time was indebted to Bower as he, with James Gregory, Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh, had been responsible for calculating the Equivalent in preparation for the Union of Parliaments.
    • Bower took his case to the Lords of Session in Edinburgh, despite a warning from the Principal that this would bring a counter action against him as 'a raiser of factions and disturber of the peace'.

  48. Tait graduates address.html
    • I found, however, that they had left me something to say :- and I discussed the high comparative value o' the Edinburgh M.A.
    • The University of Edinburgh never stood bigber, in the estimation of those at least whose judgment is of any value, than on the occasion of its Tercentenary four short years ago.
    • In fact, save for some of the representatives of the Senatus, such grand subjects as LAw, Literature, Philosophy, Mathematical and Ph 'ysical Science, and even Theology, may come to be absolutely without a voice in that Court which is, for the future, to be in fact, if not in name, the University of Edinburgh ! Not of course the old, historic, University of Edinburgh ; not that of the Tercentenary, some of whose proud memories I have just faintly recalled; but too probably, as I will presently show, a University of the lowest nineteenth-century type, a patron of Cram and not of Culture ! .

  49. Bessel and the Royal Astronomical Society
    • He also tells us that Bessel came to Scotland and visited Edinburgh and the Highlands of Scotland:- .
    • He was known in this country chiefly by his writings, but he visited it in 1842, when he passed a week, along with Jacobi, in Henderson's company at Edinburgh and in the Highlands, and stayed with Herschel, who learnt from him his intention of investigating the errors of Uranus on the hypothesis of an exterior planet.
    • Did Bessel investigate the errors of Uranus on the hypothesis of an exterior planet? Who was the Henderson that Bessel went to visit in Edinburgh? .
    • It was the parallax of Alpha Centauri that Bessel wanted to discuss with Henderson when he visited Edinburgh in 1842.

  50. Leonard J Savage: 'Foundations of Statistics
    • The International Congress of Mathematicians was held in Edinburgh from 14 August to 21 August 1958.
    • (B) 17 (1955), 69-78.','5],[',' Sir Ronald A Fisher, Statistical Methods and Scientific Inference (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1956).','6] that the methods and ideas appropriate to frankly economic problems are not appropriate to the problems of science, the problems of finding out the truth for the truth's sake.
    • 42 (1947), 658-664.','2] and Fisher [',' Sir Ronald A Fisher, Statistical Methods and Scientific Inference (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1956).','6] , and quite apart from these ideas.
    • Sir Ronald A Fisher, Statistical Methods and Scientific Inference (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1956).

  51. Napierian logarithms explained by Pietro Mengoli
    • At its meeting of 15 July 1912, the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh resolved to commemorate the tercentenary of the publication in 1614 of Napier's Mirifici Logarithmorum Canonis Descriptio.
    • From Saturday 25 July 1914 to Monday 27 July 1914 the Royal Society of Edinburgh held a Congress in Edinburgh to honour the Tercentenary.
    • A fine volume was published in the following year C G Knott (ed.), Napier Memorial Volume (Royal Society of Edinburgh, London, 1915).

  52. A Napierian logarithm before Napier
    • At its meeting of 15 July 1912, the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh resolved to commemorate the tercentenary of the publication in 1614 of Napier's Mirifici Logarithmorum Canonis Descriptio.
    • From Saturday 25 July 1914 to Monday 27 July 1914 the Royal Society of Edinburgh held a Congress in Edinburgh to honour the Tercentenary.
    • A fine volume was published in the following year C G Knott (ed.), Napier Memorial Volume (Royal Society of Edinburgh, London, 1915).

  53. D'Arcy Thompson's family
    • in 1852 he became classical master in the Edinburgh Academy, where R L Stevenson was, in 1861-2, one of his pupils, a fact recorded by Stevenson in his song called 'Their Laureate to an Academy Class Dinner Club' and beginning 'Dear Thompson Class.' .
    • In 1863, after spending twelve years as a classics teacher at the Edinburgh Academy, Thompson moved to Ireland when offered the chair of Greek in Queen's College, Galway.
    • D'Arcy Thompson's reputation mainly rests on his 'Day Dreams of a Schoolmaster' (Edinburgh, 1864, 1865), a pathetic and humorous record of his schooldays at 'St Edward's,' and of his teaching years at the 'Schola Nova' of 'dear Dunedin.' Interwoven with a thread of autobiography, the book is a plea for the sympathetic teaching of the ancient languages, a protest against the then narrow education of women, and a passionate defence of the dignity of the schoolmaster's calling.
    • Of a third volume, cancelled before publication, 'Rhymes Witty and Whymsical' (Edinburgh, 1865), a copy was sold in Sir T D Brodie's sale at Sotheby's in 1904.

  54. Leslie works
    • The following article appeared in the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes.
    • Professor of Mathematics, Edinburgh, 1805-1819; Professor of Natural Philosophy, 1819-1832 .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society, at the opening of the session on 4th November, 1932, paid tribute to the fame of Professor Sir John Leslie by a Centenary celebration.
    • An account of this will be found in the Edinburgh University Journal for the current year.

  55. Chrystal EMS tribute
    • At the meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the Edinburgh Institution, 8 Queen Street on Friday 10 November with Mr John Turner, president, in the chair the following motion was ordered to be inscribed in the minutes: .
    • The members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society hereby record their deep sorrow for the death of Professor Chrystal.

  56. Gibson History 3 - Founding of the Universities
    • Not till 1582 did Edinburgh get its University and in this case "the actual promoters and founders" were "the Town Council and the Ministers of the City" (Grant.
    • So far nothing has been said of the curricula in Edinburgh University.
    • A detailed account, such as we do not possess for any of the other Universities, is given by Sir Alexander Grant in his Story of the University of Edinburgh; it will be sufficient for my purpose to state the demands in mathematics at the foundation of the CoIlege.

  57. Somerville's Booklist
    • Mary Somerville was acquainted with John Playfair (1748 - 1819), joint Professor of Mathematics in Edinburgh University from 1785 to 1805, with Sir John Leslie (1766 - 1832) Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh from 1805 to 1819, and with William Wallace (1786 - 1843) Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh from 1819 to 1838.

  58. Carr Masterclasses
    • Since 1991, with the support of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, a group of teachers and I have run mathematics masterclasses for primary school children (P6 and P7) in the Edinburgh and Glasgow areas.
    • Author: Jack Carr, Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS.

  59. Mathematical Works of Colin Maclaurin
    • A Treatise of Fluxions, 2 volumes (Edinburgh, 1742).
    • Publications in the Physical and Literary Society, Edinburgh, Vol.
    • Edinburgh, 1915, 36, 87-150.

  60. Boole-Thomson correspondence
    • Boole and Thomson arranged to meet in Edinburgh in November 1850 but the meeting never took place as Boole describes: .
    • I think it worth while to write to you and explain how it was that I did not meet you on the Sunday in Edinburgh according to my promise.
    • I accordingly took a coach the next morning to your lodgings to ask you to breakfast with me, it having been arranged that my sister and I were to leave Edinburgh at noon.

  61. Gibson appointment
    • He has contributed several papers on mathematical subjects to different scientific periodicals, chiefly to the "Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society," of which body he was president in 1888-9.
    • He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was a member of its Council from 1905 to 1908.
    • In 1905 the University of Edinburgh conferred on him the honorary degree of LL.D.

  62. Green speech
    • Dad was a research mathematician, an algebraist, a Fellow of the Royal Societies of Edinburgh and of London, who came in his turn also from an academic family.
    • Frederick Green finished his working life as a professor at Edinburgh: our paternal grandparents were drawn back to Scotland - that is where we knew them as children, and where they died.
    • From Edinburgh we progressed to rain-drenched, midge-ridden but somehow idyllic holidays on the isles of Bute and Mull, together with the family of Dad's best friend, Jimmy Crighton and his wife Beth.

  63. McBride equal bisectors
    • Many solutions or none? A centenary account, published in January 1943 in volume 33 of the Edinburgh Mathematical Notes.
    • (London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine - December 1852.) .
    • Also to an article by the late Dr J S Mackay in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  64. Thomas Muir: 'History of determinants
    • Some three or four years afterwards, when there had been time to test the completeness of the earlier portion of the list, the writings included in it were taken up in historical succession and suitable abstracts or reviews of them made for publication in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh; the first contribution of this kind was presented to the Society in the beginning of the year 1886.
    • In 1890 a collection was made of the contributions, just mentioned, which had up to that date been printed in the Edinburgh Proceedings, and with the consent of the Society was published separately.
    • It was thus not until March 1900 that a second series of analytic abstracts began to appear in the Edinburgh Proceedings, and that the preparation of a third list of writings was methodically undertaken.

  65. Weatherburn papers
    • On triple systems and non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 46 (1926), 194-205.
    • Some properties of a family of curves on a surface, Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society 1 (1927), 160-165.
    • On certain quadric hypersurfaces in Riemannian space, Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society 4 (1934), 85-91.

  66. Gerard Murphy papers
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  67. Born Inaugural
    • Max Born gave his Inaugural Lecture as Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy, University of Edinburgh in 1936.
    • The lecture Some Philosophical Aspects of Modern Physics was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was also issued separately.
    • Edinburgh 57 (1936-37), 1-18.

  68. Edmund Whittaker: 'Physics and Philosophy
    • A special Whittaker Memorial Number of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was issued in June 1958.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  69. Gibson History 1 - Introduction
    • EDINBURGH .
    • ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH CONSTITUTED.

  70. MacRobert Professor
    • He collaborated with the late Professor Andrew Gray in the revision of Gray and Mathew's "Bessel Functions," and had a large share in the editing of the second edition of Bromwich's "Infinite Series." He has published numerous original papers in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  71. Burntisland visit
    • Burntisland was then a small quiet seaport town with little or no commerce, situated on the coast of Fife, immediately opposite to Edinburgh.
    • Alan had a first degree in physics from the University of Edinburgh and had then studied divinity at the University of St Andrews.

  72. Gibson History 8 - James Stirling
    • In the first group of Snell Exhibitioners sent up in 1699 by Glasgow College to Balliol College, Oxford, one was a Gregory - Charles Gregory (born 1681), fourth son of David Gregory of Kinairdy, and brother of David Gregory who had succeeded his uncle James Gregory as Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh.
    • Mr Tweedie has dealt so fully with the special features of Stirling's work in papers in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and in his book on Stirling that it seems unnecessary for me to dwell on them.

  73. Gregory's father
    • In D Brewster (ed.), The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia (William Blackwood, Edinburgh, 1830), the following additional information about the Rev John Gregory is given: .

  74. Arthur Eddington's 1927 Gifford Lectures
    • In 1927 Arthur Eddington gave the Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh.
    • This book is substantially the course of Gifford Lectures which I delivered in the University of Edinburgh in January to March 1927.

  75. Pinkerton rector
    • At a special meeting of the School Board of Glasgow yesterday, Mr Peter Pinkerton, deputy-headmaster, and head of the Mathematical department, George Watson's College, Edinburgh, was unanimously appointed rector of Glasgow High School.
    • He was secretary, and subsequently president, of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, is editor of Mathematical Notes and the Review of Elementary Mathematics and Science, and joint author with Professor Gibson of "The Elements of Analytical Geometry." .

  76. Gibson History 10 - Matthew Stewart, John Stewart, William Trail
    • He entered the University of Glasgow in 1734 and in 1741 went to the University of Edinburgh to prepare for entering the Church.
    • It is a curious fact, however, that the credit for the Theorem is due to Simson; for a full discussion of the matter I would refer to Dr Mackay's paper on "Matthew Stewart's Theorem" in the 10th volume of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  77. Gibson: 'History of Scottish Mathematics
    • In 1927 the Edinburgh Mathematical Society began to publish Series 2 of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  78. Gibson History 5 - James Gregory
    • In 1669 he was appointed to the Chair of Mathematics at St Andrews; in that position be had a busy and, as the years passed, a rather troubled life so that he was glad to accept a call in 1674 to be Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh where, as he says in a letter to a friend in Paris, "my salary is double and my encouragements much greater." (Acad.
    • His Edinburgh professorship was, however, very brief as he died in October 1675.

  79. Atiyah reviews
    • Edinburgh Lectures on Geometry, Analysis and Physics (2010), by Michael Atiyah.
    • These lecture notes are based on a set of six lectures that I gave in Edinburgh in 2008/2009 and they cover some topics in the interface between Geometry and Physics.

  80. Scottish University Examinations
    • We give some samples of the examinations set at the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow and St Andrews in the 1880's in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (Physics) .
    • University of Edinburgh Examinations 1882-83 .

  81. Twenty-Five Years of Groups St Andrews Conferences
    • The British Council, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, the Royal Society of London have provided grants, while the universities of St Andrews, Galway, Bath and Oxford have all contributed in financial and other ways to the success of the conferences.
    • Additionally there was a special part (Volume 30 Part I) of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society consisting of sixteen of the papers presented at Groups St Andrews 1985, together with an introduction.

  82. Founding of the Scottish Universities
    • Founding of Edinburgh University .
    • The University of Edinburgh was founded in I S82, by a Royal Charter granted by James VI.

  83. Mathematics at Aberdeen 1
    • As a baillie again, he was chosen to go to Edinburgh in 1644 in an attempt to obtain redress from the Committee of Estates for damage done in the town by raiding King's men.
    • Andrews and Edinburgh was a student at this time, graduating in 1657.) .

  84. DArcy Thompson knighted
    • His election to the presidency of the Classical Association testifies to his knowledge of and interest in the ancient languages and literature of Greece and Rome: his election as an honorary member and as president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in recognition of his pioneer work in the application of mathematical methods to biological studies is a guarantee of mathematical ability of no mean order; and his work as adviser to the Fishery Board for Scotland and as a delegate to the Behring Sea Fisheries Conference and to the North Sea Conference sufficiently indicates his international fame as a scientific investigator.
    • In 1898, in the reign of Queen Victoria, he received the honour of Commander of the Bath, and has been honoured by learned societies and Universities, including the University of Edinburgh, which conferred upon him the honorary degree of LL.D.

  85. Professor Chrystal
    • When Chrystal came to Edinburgh he rooted up the humours of the classroom as a dentist draws teeth.
    • This article appeared in the University of Edinburgh Journal, Vol.

  86. Gibson History 11 - John Playfair, Sir John Leslie
    • With the accession of Playfair in 1785 to the Chair of Mathematics in Edinburgh there is the beginning of a decided change in the mathematical outlook.
    • There can be no doubt, I think, that in the closing years of the 18th and the early years of the 19th century, Edinburgh was pre-eminent in Scotland for its active and enlightened interest in science, and the Royal Society was the centre from which that interest was maintained.

  87. Turnbull lectures on Colin Maclaurin, Part 2
    • Five years later this same case of pivots and linear guides was discussed by Braikenridge, a talented geometer who taught mathematics in Edinburgh privately for some years, and who showed to Maclaurin his results: 'which, at the same time, I showed him in my papers', Maclaurin adds.
    • It was written in English and published at Edinburgh in 1742, and contained a mature and systematic account of Newton's fluxions, set out both in geometrical and in analytical form, with a wealth of applications and many novel discoveries.

  88. Gibson History 7 - Robert Simson
    • The centre of interest now shifts from St Andrews and Edinburgh to Glasgow.
    • Sectionum Conicarum Libri Quinque (Edinburgh, 1735); a second, improved and enlarged, edition appeared in 1750.

  89. Halmos: creative art
    • Paul Halmos gave a lecture on Mathematics as a creative art in Edinburgh on 7 May 1973.
    • The lecture was published in the Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1973 (Session 1971-1972).

  90. Charles Tweedie on James Stirling
    • Carnegie Fellow, 1917-1920, Lecturer in Pure Mathematics, University of Edinburgh .
    • Of the many friends who have helped to lighten my task I am particularly indebted to Dr C G Knott, F.R.S., and to Professor E T Whittaker, F.R.S., of Edinburgh University; also to Professor George A Gibson, of Glasgow University, who gave me every encouragement to persevere in my research, and most willingly put at my disposal his mature criticism of the mathematicians contemporary with Stirling.

  91. Tait at the R&A
    • In his Edinburgh home he was not a club man, and I believe he refused to join in any way in club life; but in his holiday time he loved to mingle with the golfers, and enjoyed greatly his billiards.
    • We, who had not been his pupils, were thus able to guess the cause of that power and fascination which he had exercised over generations of Edinburgh students.

  92. Turnbull and Aitken: 'Canonical Matrices
    • University of Edinburgh .
    • Edinburgh .

  93. Edward Sang on his tables
    • The negotiations, however, fell through, for reasons which were never very publicly made known; but in the session 1820-21 the rumour was current amongst us students of mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, that the English Commissioners were dissatisfied of the soundness of the calculations - and so it was that the idea of an entire recalculation came into my mind.

  94. EMS Roll of Honour for World War I
    • The following Roll of Honour was printed in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Vol XXXVII, Session 1918-1919 in pages vi-vii: .

  95. Yung-Chow Wong
    • During the year 1940, four of my papers were accepted for publication by the Journal of the London Mathematics Society, the Quarterly Journal of Mathematics (Oxford series) and the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  96. Coulson: 'Electricity
    • Edinburgh and London .

  97. Survey of Modern Algebra
    • Other honours include both the Chauvenet Prize and the Distinguished Service award of the Mathematical Association of America, the Steele Career Prize of the American Mathematical Society, and honorary fellowship in the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  98. R A Fisher: 'History of Statistics
    • In 1925 R A Fisher published Statistical Methods for Research Workers in the Biological Monographs and Manuals Series by the publisher Oliver and Boyd of Edinburgh in Scotland.

  99. Heath: Everyman's Library 'Euclid' Introduction
    • The only textbook published by Simson besides his Euclid was on conic sections, Sectionum conicarum libri quinque (Edinburgh 1835); this, except for the definitions of the three conics, was based on Apollonius.

  100. Mordell reminiscences
    • There were three bracketed fourth: Edward Hodgson Berwick, Professor at Bangor, Sir Charles Darwin, Professor at Edinburgh and Master of Christ's College, and George Henry Livens, Professor at Cardiff.

  101. Chrystal: 'Algebra' Preface
    • EDINBURGH, 26th June 1886.

  102. Sneddon: 'Special functions
    • Edinburgh and London .

  103. Gillespie: 'Integration
    • Edinburgh and London .

  104. Magnus books
    • In 1948 arrangements were completed between the California Institute of Technology and the Office of Naval Research to employ at the California Institute of Technology four mathematical analysts of international reputation to complete Professor Bateman's work: Professors Arthur Erdelyi of the University of Edinburgh; Wilhelm Magnus of the University of Gottingen; Fritz Oberhettinger of the University of Mainz; and Francesco Tricomi of the University of Torino.

  105. Aitken: 'Statistical Mathematics
    • Edinburgh and London .

  106. Gregory's Astronomical Clock
    • When Gregory left St Andrews for Edinburgh in 1674 the clock must have been almost new.

  107. H L F Helmholtz: 'Theory of music' Prefaces
    • Foreign member of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh .

  108. Harnack publications
    • A Harnack, An introduction to the study of the elements of the differential and integral calculus (William and Norgate, London and Edinburgh, 1891).

  109. Tait and golf
    • The thirteenth fairway [of the Old Course, St Andrews] was the scene of a celebrated drive in 1892 by Freddie Tait, son of the Edinburgh professor P G Tait, who used to spend his summers in St Andrews, playing up to five rounds a day, starting at 6 a.m.

  110. John Walsh's delusions
    • Letter to the Editor of the Edinburgh Review, 1840.

  111. Mathematics at Aberdeen 4
    • Hamilton, born in 1743, the eighth son of an Edinburgh bookseller, came to Aberdeen after experience in banking, the family paper mill and ten years as rector of Perth Academy, at a time when the need for mathematics was being increasingly recognized.

  112. Oswald Veblen Publications
    • A list of Oswald Veblen's publications appeared in Royal Society of Edinburgh Year Book 1962, 52-59.

  113. Ledermann: 'Finite Groups
    • Edinburgh and London .

  114. R A Fisher: 'Statistical Methods' Introduction
    • In 1925 R A Fisher published Statistical Methods for Research Workers in the Biological Monographs and Manuals Series by the publisher Oliver and Boyd of Edinburgh in Scotland.

  115. Leslie Origins Number
    • The following quotation is from John Leslie's book Philosophy of Arithmetic (Edinburgh, 1820).

  116. H W Turnbull: 'Scottish Contribution to the Calculus
    • Letters and manuscripts of Colin Campbell bridging the years between J Gregory and Maclaurin give a vivid picture of scientific activity in Edinburgh and in the Highlands.

  117. Howie Committee
    • By coincidence, George Chrystal had also been Regius Professor of Mathematics at the University of St Andrews, holding this position in 1877-79, although he had moved to Edinburgh before undertaking the feasibility study for the Scottish Leaving Certificate.

  118. Sheppard Papers
    • Edinburgh 56 (1935-36), 279-282.

  119. Green's students
    • Lectured at: University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

  120. Prandtl's publications
    • Beitrage zur Mechanik der Atmosphare (Contributions to the mechanics of the atmosphere) Memoire presente a l'Association Meteorologique de l'U.G.G.I., Edinburgh, Sept.

  121. Rutherford: 'Fluid Dynamics
    • Edinburgh and London .

  122. The St Andrews Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope
    • The University has received financial assistance in undertaking this very important piece of research from the Education (Scotland) Fund, from the Carnegie Trust, and from the Royal Society of Edinburgh who through the Robert Cormack Bequest have, in addition to other financial help, provided the optical glass for the full-scale instrument.

  123. Kingdom of Naples
    • This work by General Pietro Colletta was translated from the Italian by S Horner and published with a Supplementary Chapter 1825-1856 by T Constable and Co., Edinburgh and Hamilton, Adams, and Co., London in 1858.

  124. W Burnside: 'Theory of Groups of Finite Order
    • (Edinburgh) .


Quotations

  1. Quotations by Planck
    • His name stands magnificently over the portal of classical physics, and we can say this of him; by his birth James Clerk Maxwell belongs to Edinburgh, by his personality he belongs to Cambridge, by his work he belongs to the whole world.


Famous Curves

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Chronology

  1. Mathematical Chronology
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh is founded.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society is founded.

  2. Chronology for 1780 to 1800
    • Royal Society of Edinburgh is founded.

  3. Chronology for 1880 to 1890
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society is founded.


EMS Archive

  1. Edinburgh Mathematical Society Lecturers 1883-2016
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society speakers: 1883 to 2016 .
    • Below we list venues, authors of papers/talks, affiliations where known, and titles for meetings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society from 1883, the year of the founding of the Society, to 2016.
    • (Edinburgh) Present Fields of Mathematical Research .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The triangle and its six scribed circles .
    • (High School, Edinburgh) The Nine-Point Circle .
    • (Edinburgh) An Account of Newton's 'Optics' .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The fundamental notions of the Differential Calculus .
    • (Edinburgh) Plucker's first equation connecting the singularities of curves .
    • (Edinburgh) Some notes on Quaternions .
    • (High School, Edinburgh) Some theorems on radical axes .
    • (Edinburgh) Listing's 'Topologie' .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The circles associated with the triangle viewed from their centres of similitude .
    • (Edinburgh) The Rev G McArthur's construction for Euclid II.
    • (Edinburgh) Mathematical models, chiefly of surfaces of the second degree .
    • (Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh) Pascal's 'Essais pour les coniques' .
    • (Edinburgh) Spherical geometry .
    • (Edinburgh) On voting .
    • (Edinburgh) The hypothesis of Le Bel and Van't Hoff .
    • (Edinburgh) On the representation of the physical properties of substances by means of surfaces .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The theorems as far as proposition 32 of the first book of Euclid's Elements, proved from first principles .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Geometry from common sense .
    • (Edinburgh) Application of the multiplication of matrices to prove a theorem in spherical geometry .
    • (Edinburgh) On the discrimination of conics enveloped by the rays joining the corresponding points of two projective ranges .
    • (Edinburgh) On a problem in partition of numbers .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The shoemaker's knife .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) On the number of conditions determining geometrical figures .
    • (Edinburgh) On the problem to construct the minimum circle enclosing n given points in a plane .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Geometrical notes .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on a plane strain .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) The so-called Simson-line .
    • (Edinburgh) On certain formulae for repeated differentiation .
    • (Edinburgh) On a method for obtaining the differential equation to an algebraical curve .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Mnemonics for π, 1/π, e .
    • (Edinburgh) On the Detection of amphicheiral knots, with special reference to the mathematical processes involved .
    • (Edinburgh) On a number of concurrent spheres .
    • (Edinburgh) Proposition suggested by and a generalisation of the Simson Line .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The ancient methods for the duplication of the cube .
    • (Edinburgh undergraduate) Notes on Euclid I.
    • (Edinburgh) On certain integrals .
    • (Edinburgh) On integrals occurring in the kinetic theory of gases .
    • (Edinburgh) To transform a rectangle into a square .
    • (Edinburgh) The theory of contours and its applications in physical science .
    • (Edinburgh) Solution of a problem proposed by Dr Muir on algebraical symmetry .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) Two mechanical integrators or planimeters .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The quadrature of curves especially by means of planimeters .
    • (Edinburgh undergraduate) Kinematical theorems .
    • (Edinburgh undergraduate) Bifilar suspension treated by the method of contour lines .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Abstract of one of Euler's papers .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Note on a paper or Euler's entitled 'Solutio facilis problematum quorumdam geometricorum difficillimorum' .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) On the divisibility of certain numbers .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) An arithmetical note .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) Statical proofs of some geometrical theorems .
    • (politician, Edinburgh South MP) Note on Euclid II 11, To divide a straight line in medial section .
    • (Edinburgh) The theory of contours and its applications in physical science: Second part .
    • (St Andrew Square, Edinburgh) A problem in combinations .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) Trigonometrical mnemonic .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Solutions of Euclid's Problems, with a rule and one fixed aperture of the compasses, by the Italian geometers of the sixteenth century .
    • (Edinburgh) The equilateral and the equiangular polygon .
    • (Edinburgh) On certain inverse roulette problems .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Historical notes on a geometrical theorem and its developments (18th century): incenter, circumcenter, triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) Geometrical notes: polygons, quadrilateral, harmonic conjugates .
    • (Edinburgh) On the value of nOm/nm where m and n are very large .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) An experiment in the teaching of Geometry .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on Milner's lamp .
    • (Edinburgh) An exercise on logarithmic tables .
    • (Edinburgh) A method of transformation in geometry .
    • (Edinburgh) On Stirling's approximation to n! when n is large .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) A device for the analysis of intervals and chords in music .
    • (Edinburgh) On the inequality mxm-1(x-1) < xm-1 < m(x-1) and its consequences .
    • (Edinburgh) A model of the thermodynamic surface which represents the state of water substance in terms of pressure, volume, and temperature .
    • (Edinburgh) The nine-point circle .
    • (Edinburgh) On the inscription of a triangle of given shape in a given triangle .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Pappus on the progressions .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Treatment of the progressions by the ancients as it had been preserved by Pappus .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Similitude and inversion .
    • (Edinburgh) A construction for the Brocard points .
    • (Edinburgh) On the relations between systems of curves which, together, cut their plane into squares .
    • (High School, Edinburgh) On the general equation of the second degree representing a pair of straight lines .
    • (United Presbyterian Divinity Hall, Edinburgh) Kotter's synthetic geometry of algebraic curves .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on a formula in Quaternions .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) On the solution of the equation xp - 1 = 0, p being a prime number .
    • (United Presbyterian Divinity Hall, Edinburgh) Kotter's synthetic geometry of algebraic curves: Second part of four .
    • (United Presbyterian Divinity Hall, Edinburgh) Kotter's synthetic geometry of algebraic curves: Third part of four .
    • (Edinburgh) On the expression of a symmetric function in terms of the elementary symmetric functions .
    • (United Presbyterian Divinity Hall, Edinburgh) Kotter's synthetic geometry of algebraic curves: Fourth part of four .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Solutions of two geometrical problems .
    • (Edinburgh) On some theorems in the theory of numbers .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on a curious operational theorem .
    • (Edinburgh) On a property of odd and even polygons .
    • (Edinburgh) On some properties of the quadrilateral .
    • (Edinburgh) On a problem in permutations .
    • (Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh) A method of teaching Electrostatics in school .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on Menelaus's theorem .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Historical notes on a geometrical problem and theorem: triangle, quadrilateral .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Some new properties of the triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) Proofs of some optical theorems .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) The triangle and its escribed parabolas .
    • (Edinburgh) Some geometrical theorems .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) The triangle and its escribed parabolas .
    • (Edinburgh) On the use of dimensional equations in physics .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) Some relations between the orthic and the median triangles .
    • (Edinburgh) On some properties of a triangle of given shape inscribed in a given triangle .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The Wallace line and the Wallace point .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) Note on an equation of motion .
    • (Edinburgh) The barycentric calculus of Mobius .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) On the history and degree of certain geometrical approximations, (Part 1 of 2) .
    • (Edinburgh) On the contact property of the eleven-point conic .
    • (Edinburgh) Deduction of the thermodynamical relations .
    • (Edinburgh) On the relation between the stereographic projections of points of a plane related to one another by inversion .
    • (Edinburgh) Experimental introduction to the study of magnetism .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) On the history and degree of certain geometrical approximations, (Part 2 of 2) .
    • (Edinburgh) On a surface of the third order .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Matthew Stewart's theorem .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) History of the nine-point circle .
    • (Edinburgh) Note of Newton's theorem of symmetric functions .
    • (Edinburgh) The Quaternion and its depreciators: Recent quaternion heresies .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) On some loci connected with conics .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on attraction .
    • (Edinburgh) On the fundamental principles of Quaternions with other vector analyses .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Early history of the symmedian point .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Adams's hexagons and circles .
    • (Edinburgh) The elements of Quaternions, (Part 1 of 2) .
    • (Edinburgh) The elements of Quaternions, (Part 2 of 2) .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) Note on a problem in analytical geometry: triangles, parallelograms, diagonals .
    • (Edinburgh) Japanese arithmetic .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The geometrography of Euclid's problems .
    • (Edinburgh) An arithmetical problem .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) On certain maxima and minima .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) Notes on factoring .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Formulae connected with the radii of the incircle and the excircles of a triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) On the division of a parallelepiped into tetrahedra without making new corners .
    • (Edinburgh) On the solution of the Cubic and Quartic .
    • (Edinburgh) Colour-sensation and colour-blindness with experiments .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Properties connected with the angular bisectors of a triangle: Some new circles connected with the triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) Some formulae in connection with the parabolic section of the canonical quadric .
    • (Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh) A suggestion for the improvement of mathematical tables .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Proposal with regard to British tables of linear and square measure: On a necessary reform in arithmetic .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Isogonals of a triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) A Summary of the theory of a coaxial system of lenses for small apertures, according to Mobius and Gauss, with applications to a photographic triplet .
    • (Church of Scotland Training College, Edinburgh) Address on celestial photography .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on the circles of curvature of a plane curve .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Symmedians of a triangle and their concomitant circles .
    • (Church of Scotland Training College, Edinburgh) On the geometrical representation of elliptic integrals of the first kind, (Part 1 of 2) .
    • (Church of Scotland Training College, Edinburgh) On the geometrical representation of elliptic integrals of the first kind, (Part 2 of 2) .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) On a proof of the fundamental combination theorem .
    • (Edinburgh Academy) Maximum and minimum .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) A geometrical proof of certain trigonometrical formulae (the addition theorem, etc.) .
    • Edinburgh Muirhead, R.F.
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Isogonic centres of a triangle .
    • (Glasgow and Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh) Discussion on Euclid's definition of Proportion: Proposal that in the teaching of elementary geometry, Euclid's definition of proportion be abandoned .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) Elementary notes: 1) On the factorisation of a function of n variables, and 2) On the use of the term 'produced' .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) Geometrical theory of the hyperbolic functions .
    • (Edinburgh) Elementary notes: inequality theorem, exponential limit .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on attraction .
    • (Edinburgh) Elementary proof of the potential theorems regarding uniform spherical shells .
    • (Edinburgh) On the dissipation of energy in vibrating matter .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on the expression for the area of a triangle in Cartesian co-ordinates, and a general proof of the addition theorem in Trigonometry connected therewith .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on four circles touching a common circle .
    • (Edinburgh) On the nine-point conic .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on the cooling of a sphere in a mass of well-stirred liquid .
    • (Edinburgh) Some elementary theorems regarding surds .
    • (Edinburgh) On a cubic curve connected with the triangle .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) Theorems in connection with lines drawn through a pair of points parallel and antiparallel to the sides of a triangle .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) History of a theorem in elementary geometry: the isosceles triangle .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Note on the theorems of Menelaus and Ceva .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) Notes on decimal coinage and approximation .
    • (Edinburgh) On some systems of conics connected with the triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) Anallagmatic curves, part 1: equations and inversions .
    • (Edinburgh) A construction for the force, at any point, due to electric point-charges or ideal magnets, with an extension to continuous distributions .
    • (Edinburgh) On the uniqueness of solution of the linear differential equation of the second order .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Mathematical correspondence: Robert Simson, Matthew Stewart, James Stirling .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) On the decimalization of money .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) Note on the antireciprocal points .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Note on mental division by large numbers .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) A note on a theorem in double series .
    • (Edinburgh) Inequality theorem regarding the lines joining corresponding vertices of two equilateral, or directly similar, triangles, (Part 1 of 2) .
    • (Edinburgh) Inequality theorem regarding the lines joining corresponding vertices of two equilateral, or directly similar, triangles, (Part 2 of 2) .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) On the use of symmetry in geometry .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The turning of values of a cubic and the nature of the roots of a cubic equation .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on Newton's theorem of symmetric functions .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) Note on the problem: To draw through a given point a transversal to (a) a given triangle (b) a given quadrilateral so that the intercepted segments may have (a) a given ratio (b) a given cross ratio .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The turning values of cubic and quartic functions and the nature of the roots of cubic and quartic equations .
    • (Advocate, Edinburgh) Two theorems on the factors of 2p - 1 .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) On the orthoptic locus of the semi-cubical parabola .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Bibliography of the envelope of the Wallace line: the three-cusped hypocycloid .
    • (Edinburgh) A problem of Lewis Carroll's, and the rational solutions of a Diophantine cubic .
    • (Royal High School, Edinburgh) On the teaching of geometry .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) On a nine-point conic .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The parabolic path of a projectile .
    • (Edinburgh) On Newton's theorem in the calculus of variations .
    • (Edinburgh) The conditions for the reality of the roots of an n-ic .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) Theorems connected with Simson's line .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on hypercomplex numbers .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) Points at infinity, etc.
    • (lived in Edinburgh) Coaxial circles and conics .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) On the teaching to beginners of such transformations as -(-a) = +a .
    • (Edinburgh) On commutative matrices .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) On area-theory and some applications .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) Herbert Spencer and mathematics .
    • (lived in Edinburgh) Theorem regarding orthogonal conics .
    • (Edinburgh) Examples in the geometry of cross ratios .
    • (lived in Edinburgh) Geometrical extraction of cube root .
    • (lived in Edinburgh) A certain relation between coaxial circles and conics .
    • (Edinburgh) On certain theorems in determinants .
    • (Edinburgh) On the locus of a foci of a system of similar conics through three points .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) A geometrical proof of a theorem connected with the tetrahedron .
    • (Edinburgh) Polygons and polyhedra of higher species: Relation between the distances of a point from three vertices of a regular polygon .
    • (lived in Edinburgh) Geometrical construction for the approximate evaluation of π/4 .
    • (lived in Edinburgh) The relation between the golden section of the radius and the quinquesection of the circle .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) The recent reform of teaching of mathematics and science in Germany .
    • (Advocate, Edinburgh) A root of the cubic equation expressed as a continued fraction .
    • (Advocate, Edinburgh) A method of investigating the geometry of families of curves, with examples .
    • (Edinburgh) On the envelope of the directrices of a system of similar conics through three points .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The scope of elementary geometry .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The geometry of the general pedal curve .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) An extension of the remainder theorem .
    • (Edinburgh) The fundamental formula for the area of a triangle in analytical geometry .
    • (Edinburgh) Proof of a fundamental relation in the theory of bending between the bending moment and load curves, or between the deflection and bending moment curves .
    • (Edinburgh undergraduate) Two general theorems in the differential calculus .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) A problem of Robert Simson's .
    • (Edinburgh) Changes in university mathematics during the last twenty years .
    • (lived in Edinburgh) The "O" circle of the co-axial triad through the vertices of a triangle, and the "O" locus for a cyclic quadrangle .
    • (Edinburgh) A simple linkage for describing equal areas .
    • (Edinburgh) Model of a well-known deformable triangular linkage .
    • (Edinburgh) Graphical harmonic analysis .
    • (Edinburgh) On some results concerning integral equations .
    • (Provincial Training College, Edinburgh) On the equation of the parabolic cylinder functions .
    • (Edinburgh) On the continued fractions which represent the functions of Hermite and other functions defined by differential equations .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) Concurrency of lines joining vertices of a triangle to opposite vertices of triangles on its sides .
    • (Edinburgh) On certain theorems on continued fractions equivalent to Riemann's and other transformations of the P-function .
    • (Edinburgh) On the general solution of Mathieu's equation .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) Napier's 'De Arte Logistica' .
    • (Edinburgh) The elliptic cylinder functions of the second kind .
    • (Edinburgh) On a class of differential equations whose solutions satisfy integral equations .
    • (Edinburgh) On an integral-equation whose solutions are the Legendre polynomials .
    • (Edinburgh) On a class of integral equations, {Communicated by Professor Whittaker} .
    • (Provincial Training College, Edinburgh) On the roots of the confluent hypergeometric functions .
    • (Edinburgh) Quaternion proof of the theorem of moments in rigid dynamics .
    • (George Watson's Ladies' College, Edinburgh) On spheroidal harmonics .
    • (Edinburgh) On the roots of a derivative of a rational function .
    • (Edinburgh) Studies of the life and writings of Colin Maclaurin, {Communicated by David Gibb} .
    • (Edinburgh) Exhibition of two simple nomograms .
    • (Ladies' College, Edinburgh) Determinants connected with the periodic solutions of Mathieu's equation .
    • (Edinburgh) On the oscillating functions derived from a discontinuous function .
    • (postgraduate student, Edinburgh) Fourier's integral .
    • (postgraduate student, Edinburgh) On the theory of continued fractions .
    • (Provincial Training College, Edinburgh) The conformal representation of the quotient of two Bessel functions .
    • (Edinburgh) On the continued fractions associated with the hypergeometric equation, {Communicated by Glenny Smeal} .
    • (Provincial Training College, Edinburgh) Note on the Peano-Baker method of solving linear differential equations .
    • (Librarian, Edinburgh) On integral relations connected with the hypergeometric function .
    • (Edinburgh) A simple form of integrometer .
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) On a group of parabolas associated with the triangle .
    • (Edinburgh) On the solution of Riccati's equation by continued fractions .
    • (postgraduate student, Edinburgh) On symmetric determinants and Pfaffians .
    • (Edinburgh) Some theorems on determinants .
    • (postgraduate student, Edinburgh) On the theory of continued fractions: second paper .
    • (Edinburgh) On a class of continued fractions .
    • (Edinburgh) On certain determinants of Cayley and Sylvester .
    • (Edinburgh) An addition to the slide-rule .
    • (Edinburgh) A method of solving algebraic equations .
    • (postgraduate student, Edinburgh) On the failure of Heilermann's theorem .
    • (Edinburgh) A geometrical proof of a theorem by Hurwitz and Borel .
    • (Edinburgh) On the latent roots of compound determinants and Brill's determinants .
    • (Edinburgh) The effect of a rise in prices on the amount of small money used .
    • (Edinburgh) Nicole's contribution to the foundations of the calculus of finite differences, {Communicated by Ellice Martin Horsburgh} .
    • (Edinburgh) An asymptotic representation of the exponential function: On Poisson's integral-equation .
    • (Edinburgh) On a difference equation due to Stirling .
    • (Edinburgh) On Bernoulli's and Furstenau's methods for the solution of equations .
    • (Edinburgh) An approximate formula for the length of an arc of a suspended rope .
    • (Edinburgh) The parameter method of iteration .
    • (Edinburgh) A new form of the remainder in Newton's interpolation formula .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on the Quaternion theory of confocals .
    • (Edinburgh) Relations connected with the generalised differentiation .
    • (Edinburgh) Some new expansions in series of polynomials: A formula for the solution of algebraic or transcendental equations .
    • (Edinburgh) The Stirling numbers and polynomials, {Communicated by Archibald Milne} .
    • (Edinburgh) A mechanical solution of a differential equation of torsion .
    • (Edinburgh) Some disputed questions of probability .
    • (Edinburgh) Systems of rays in quaternion symbolism .
    • (Edinburgh) A new basis for graduation .
    • (Edinburgh) The slip surface and failure of metal in tension .
    • (Edinburgh) A radiant transparent scale for use with an abacus .
    • (Edinburgh) The life of James Stirling, the Jacobite Mathematician, with exhibition of autograph letters by N.
    • (Edinburgh) Some developments in curve-fitting and the calculus of differences .
    • (Edinburgh) Robert Hooke on molecular interplay .
    • (Edinburgh) On direct and inverse interpolation by divided differences .
    • (George Heriot's School, Edinburgh) On inverse probability .
    • (Edinburgh) A problem in dynamics: The vibrations of a particle about a position of equilibrium, .
    • (Edinburgh) On the relation between Pincherle's polynomials and the hypergeometric function .
    • (Edinburgh) The geometry of relativity .
    • (Edinburgh) The vibrations of a particle about a position of equilibrium, Part 2.
    • (Edinburgh) On Sylvester's dialytic method of elimination .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on an asymptotic expansion for the exponential function .
    • (Edinburgh) Root extraction by the calculating machine .
    • (Edinburgh) Recent work on earthquake waves .
    • (Scottish Widows' Fund in Edinburgh) A new form for the sum of a trigonometric series, {Communicated by George D C Stokes} .
    • (Scottish Widows' Fund in Edinburgh) Notes on Everett's interpolation formula, {Communicated by George Robinson} .
    • (Edinburgh) The vibrations of a particle about a position of equilibrium, Part 3, The significance of the divergence of the series solution .
    • (Edinburgh) The vibrations of a particle about a position of equilibrium, Part 4, The convergence of the trigonometric series of dynamics .
    • (Edinburgh) On some questions connected with skew determinants .
    • (The Academy, Edinburgh) A discussion on the teaching of elementary geometry .
    • (Edinburgh) An elementary proof of Girard's theorem .
    • (Edinburgh) An infinite product of Euler .
    • (Edinburgh) and Frewin, G.L.
    • (George Watson's College, Edinburgh) The numerical evaluation of double integrals .
    • (Edinburgh) On a linear partial differential equation of hyperbolic type .
    • (Edinburgh) On inverse functions .
    • (Edinburgh) The conservation theorems of a damped dynamical system .
    • (Edinburgh) An extension of Heaviside's operational method of solving differential equations .
    • (Edinburgh) Series formulae for the roots of equations .
    • (Edinburgh) A series for symmetric functions of roots of equations .
    • (Edinburgh) Notes on James Gray, {Communicated by Archibald Milne} .
    • (Edinburgh) On self-adjoint partial differential equations of the second order, (Part 1) .
    • (Edinburgh) On the Riemann P-equation with integral exponent differences .
    • (Edinburgh) On the cardinal function of interpolation .
    • (Edinburgh) On recurring decimals .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on Binet's inverse factorial series for μ(x) .
    • (Edinburgh) The mathematical theory of graduation .
    • (Edinburgh) On the relation between inverse factorial series and binomial coefficient series .
    • (Edinburgh) Charles Tweedie, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.S.E., (Obituary notice) .
    • (Provincial Training College, Edinburgh) William Lindsay, (Obituary notice) .
    • (Edinburgh) On self-adjoint partial differential equations of the second order (Part 2) .
    • (College of Physicians Laboratory, Edinburgh) Applications of mathematics to medical problems .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on Whittaker's solution for Laplace's equation .
    • (Edinburgh) An addition theorem for the Mathieu functions .
    • (Edinburgh) On the concept of frequency of light .
    • (Edinburgh) On determinants of symmetric functions .
    • (Edinburgh) On the correlation of aggregates .
    • (Edinburgh) On the cardinal function of interpolation theory .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on the integral equations for the Lame functions .
    • (Edinburgh) Permutations and allied topics .
    • (Edinburgh) Interpolation with least mean square of error .
    • (Edinburgh) Definitions, axioms and existence-theorems in Euclid .
    • (Edinburgh) On the latent roots of matrices .
    • (Edinburgh) Infinitesimal analysis of an arc in n-space .
    • (Edinburgh) On Hardy's theory of m-functions .
    • (Edinburgh) Cardinal function interpolation .
    • (Edinburgh) On Whitehead's theory of relativity .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on Numerical Integration .
    • (Edinburgh) Recurrence formulae in the theory of the equations of mathematical physics .
    • (Edinburgh) The numerical solution of algebraic equations .
    • (Edinburgh) The reduction of a matrix to its normal form .
    • (Edinburgh) On the Stieltjes integral .
    • (Edinburgh) A general formula of polynomial interpolation .
    • (Edinburgh) On rotations on n-dimensional space .
    • (Edinburgh) Notes on the tensor calculus .
    • (Edinburgh) On the Poisson sum of a Fourier series .
    • (Scottish Widows' Fund in Edinburgh) On the extention of Aitken's theorem (on polynomial interpolation) to the Everett Types, {Communicated by A C Aitken} .
    • (Edinburgh) Spherical simplexes in n-dimensions .
    • (Edinburgh) On Charlier's new form of the frequency function .
    • (Edinburgh) Grassmann manifolds and their representations .
    • (Edinburgh) A generalization of a theorem of Mercer .
    • (Edinburgh) Intersections of quadrics .
    • (Edinburgh) The absolute summability (A) of Fourier series .
    • (Edinburgh) On the 'flat' region of integral functions of finite order, {Communicated by E T Copson} .
    • (Edinburgh) On the 'Elementary' solution of a Laplace's equation .
    • (Edinburgh) Early instruments in navigation and surveying .
    • (Edinburgh) A 'cubical' universe .
    • (Edinburgh) On the connexion between Levi-Civita's parallelism and Einstein's parallelism .
    • (Edinburgh) A problem of Ramanujan .
    • (Edinburgh) Mass condensations and the size of the universe .
    • (Edinburgh) The remainder theorem .
    • (Edinburgh) Generalised solutions of Laplace's equation .
    • (Edinburgh) On the solution of differential equations by definite integrals .
    • (Royal College of Physicians Laboratory, Edinburgh) and McCrea, W.H.
    • (Edinburgh) On Whittaker's method of solution of differential equations by definite integrals, Part I .
    • (Edinburgh) Note on dual symmetric functions .
    • (Edinburgh) A class of arithmetical identities .
    • (Edinburgh) On the sections of a sicyoid .
    • (Edinburgh) On the partial differential equations of mathematical physics .
    • (Edinburgh) On errors in determinants .
    • (Edinburgh) Operational proofs of some identities .
    • (Royal College of Physicians Laboratory, Edinburgh) and McCrea, W.H.
    • (Edinburgh) On Whittaker's method of solution of differential equations by definite integrals, Part II .
    • (Edinburgh) The mechanical solution of linear equations .
    • (Edinburgh) The composition of linear differential systems .
    • (Edinburgh) Recent advances on the theory of functions .
    • (Edinburgh) James Clerk Maxwell and Peter Guthrie Tait .
    • (Edinburgh) Interpolation given by means of differences (Central difference notation) .
    • (Edinburgh) Careers open to Honours Graduates in Mathematics .
    • (Edinburgh) On interpolation by iteration of proportional parts, without the use of differences .
    • (Edinburgh) Mathematical Statistics .
    • (Trinity Academy, Edinburgh) Mr H G Forder's recent works on geometry, in relation to school mathematics .
    • (Edinburgh) Factorial moments and frequencies of Charlier's Type B .
    • (Edinburgh) A theorem on the complete integral .
    • Edinburgh Horsburgh, E.M.
    • (Edinburgh) Sir John Leslie, mathematician and natural philosopher .
    • Edinburgh Thomson, G.H.
    • (Edinburgh) Mathematical ability and mathematical teaching .
    • Edinburgh Gillespie, R.P.
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) Notes on wave mechanics .
    • Edinburgh Dougall, J.
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) On pencils of hermitian forms; .
    • (Edinburgh) On fitting polynomials to correlated data .
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Some elementary properties of twisted curves .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) A method of multiplication; .
    • (Edinburgh) On solving simultaneous equations .
    • Edinburgh Lawson, G.
    • (Edinburgh) A canonical form for three quinary quadratics; .
    • (Edinburgh) The synchronising of clocks in general relativity .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • Edinburgh Ruse, H.S.
    • (Edinburgh) The twenty-one coordinates of a conic; .
    • (Edinburgh) Notes on least squares .
    • Edinburgh Thompson, D'A.W.
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) The use of non-associative algebra in genetics; .
    • (Edinburgh) A useful expansion in determinants .
    • Edinburgh Street, R.O.
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) A problem of reciprocation; .
    • (Edinburgh) The evaluation of latent roots and latent vectors .
    • Edinburgh Darwin, C.G.
    • (Edinburgh) Uncertainty .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) Determinants of fractional order; .
    • (Edinburgh) A further note on multivariate selection .
    • Edinburgh Whittaker, E.T.
    • (Edinburgh) Light waves and the Fourier theory .
    • Edinburgh Ruse, H.S.
    • (Edinburgh) Modern differential geometry .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • Edinburgh Taylor, W.
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Three quadric surfaces .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (College of Physicians, Edinburgh) Some properties of points on a single twisted Mobius surface; .
    • (Edinburgh) The arithmometer in some problems of practical mathematics .
    • Edinburgh Street, R.O.
    • Edinburgh Hyslop, J.M.
    • Edinburgh Bath, F.
    • (Edinburgh) Serret's syzygies and their applications .
    • Edinburgh Mackie, J.
    • Edinburgh Macintyre, A.J.
    • Edinburgh Strachan, C.
    • (Edinburgh) Respiration mathematics; .
    • (Edinburgh) Wallace's Theorem .
    • Edinburgh Lawson, G.
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) Reciprocals of some persymmetric matrices; .
    • (Edinburgh) The connection of classical contact-transformations with non-commuting quantities .
    • Edinburgh Timms, G.
    • Edinburgh Greaves, W.M.H.
    • Edinburgh Thomson, G.H.
    • (Edinburgh) Mathematical problems in the analysis of human ability .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) On the extension of Fermat's Theorem to matrices .
    • Edinburgh Carroll, J.A.
    • Edinburgh Finlay Freundlich, E.
    • Edinburgh Inverarity, W.M.
    • Edinburgh Ince, E.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Lame functions .
    • (Edinburgh) Estimation of statistical parameters by minimum variance .
    • Edinburgh Smart, W.M.
    • Edinburgh Brown, L.M.
    • (Edinburgh) A description of elementary topology .
    • Edinburgh Schlapp, R.
    • (Edinburgh) Turbulence .
    • Edinburgh Napier, M.M.
    • (Edinburgh) School mathematics in the U.S.A.
    • Edinburgh Graham, T.S.
    • Edinburgh Erdelyi, A.
    • (Edinburgh) Integral equations for Lame functions; .
    • (Edinburgh) A note on small vibrations .
    • Edinburgh Rutherford, D.E.
    • Edinburgh Cossar, J.
    • (Edinburgh) The summability of Fourier's integral; .
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Quartic polynomials .
    • Edinburgh Buchan, A.F.
    • Edinburgh Eggleton, P.
    • (Edinburgh) Note on bialternants .
    • Edinburgh Erdelyi, A.
    • (Edinburgh) Doubly orthogonal systems .
    • Edinburgh Born, M.
    • (Edinburgh) Stability and thermodynamics of crystal lattices .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • Edinburgh Born, M.
    • (Edinburgh), Rutherford, D.E.
    • Edinburgh Scott, W.
    • Edinburgh Offord, A.C.
    • Edinburgh Coulson, C.A.
    • (Edinburgh), Turnbull, H.W.
    • (Edinburgh) A hundred years of non-commutative algebra .
    • (Edinburgh) Eight mathematical films .
    • Edinburgh Ledermann, W.
    • (Edinburgh) Another talk on quartic polynomials .
    • Edinburgh Steele, A.D.
    • (Edinburgh) Some beginnings of algebraic structure in Greek mathematics .
    • Edinburgh Mackie, J.
    • Edinburgh Rushbrooke, G.S.
    • (Edinburgh) Transposed algebras .
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) The symmetric group and invariant theory .
    • Edinburgh Schlapp, R.
    • (Edinburgh) Some early mathematical works in Edinburgh University library .
    • Edinburgh Cossar, J.
    • (Edinburgh) The introduction of the circular functions into analysis; .
    • Edinburgh Kermack, W.O.
    • (Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh) Randomness in theory and in practice .
    • (Edinburgh) The teaching of geometry in schools .
    • Edinburgh Paton, J.
    • Edinburgh Rogosinski, W.W.
    • (Edinburgh) Non-associative arithmetics .
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Sylvester's synthematic totals and Maschke's quartic forms .
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) Some remarks on iteration; .
    • Edinburgh Buchan, A.F.
    • Edinburgh Erdelyi, A.
    • (Edinburgh) Symbolic representation of the Laplace transformation; .
    • Edinburgh Richardson, E.G.
    • Edinburgh Steele, A.D.
    • (Edinburgh) Mathematics - What it is, and what it is for; .
    • (Edinburgh) The logistical school of Bertrand Russell .
    • Edinburgh Mackie, J.
    • Edinburgh Schlapp, R.
    • (Edinburgh) The life of Colin Maclaurin .
    • Edinburgh Brown, L.M.
    • (Edinburgh) Plane involutions .
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) Some remarks on matrix differentiation; .
    • (Edinburgh) Discontinuous wave functions .
    • Edinburgh Copson, E.T.
    • Edinburgh Ruse, H.S.
    • Edinburgh Gillespie, R.P.
    • Edinburgh Whittaker, J.M.
    • Edinburgh Bonsall, F.F.
    • (Edinburgh) Linear independence of functions .
    • Edinburgh Reith, G.
    • (Depute Director of Education, Edinburgh) Statistics as an aid to the examiner .
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) Symposium on probability .
    • Edinburgh Greaves, W.M.H.
    • Edinburgh Etherington, I.M.H.
    • (Edinburgh) Recent progress in non-associative algebras .
    • Edinburgh Zassenhaus, H.J.
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Undulations on plane quartic curves .
    • Edinburgh Thomson, G.H.
    • Edinburgh Whittaker, E.T.
    • (Edinburgh) The life and work of Laplace .
    • Edinburgh Marshall, J.B.
    • (Edinburgh) Powers of Gauss sums .
    • Edinburgh Goddard, L.S.
    • Edinburgh McLachlan, N.W.
    • (Edinburgh) Some polynomial reciprocities .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • Edinburgh McHarg, E.
    • Edinburgh Sneddon, I.N.
    • Edinburgh Brown, L.M.
    • (Edinburgh) Configurations of associated spaces .
    • Edinburgh Copson, E.T.
    • Edinburgh Edge, W.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Humbert's plane sextics of genus 5 .
    • Edinburgh Robson, A.
    • Edinburgh Lawley, D.N.
    • (Moray House, Edinburgh) Mathematical problems connected with the construction of intelligence tests .
    • Edinburgh Burchnall, J.L.
    • (Edinburgh) Note on quasigroups associated with a cubic curve .
    • Edinburgh Turnbull, H.W.
    • Edinburgh Schlapp, R.
    • (Edinburgh) Some phenomena of oscillatory motion .
    • Edinburgh Melvin, H.M.
    • Edinburgh Walker, D.A.
    • Edinburgh Macintyre, A.J.
    • Edinburgh Finlay Freundlich, E.
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) Positive linear transformations and Markov chains .
    • Edinburgh Rutherford, D.E.
    • Edinburgh Popova, H.
    • Edinburgh Brown, L.M.
    • (Edinburgh) What is a circle? .
    • Edinburgh Lighthill, M.J.
    • Edinburgh Wolf, E.
    • (Edinburgh) The circle polynomials of Zernike .
    • Edinburgh Graham, T.S.
    • Edinburgh Macbeath, M.
    • Edinburgh Nisbet, A.
    • (Edinburgh) Linearly polarised time-harmonic electromagnetic waves of arbitrary form; .
    • Edinburgh Donaldson, W.J.
    • Edinburgh Gunn, J.C.
    • Edinburgh Borwein, D.
    • Edinburgh Potter, H.S.A.
    • Edinburgh Vosper, A.G.
    • Edinburgh Scott, T.
    • (Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh) Notes on a pentahedral net of quadrics; .
    • Edinburgh Schlapp, R.
    • (Edinburgh) Teaching of elementary dynamics; Sowery, Teaching of elementary dynamics; .
    • Edinburgh Kemmer, N.
    • (Edinburgh) The success of bad mathematics in modern physics .
    • Edinburgh Copson, E.T.
    • Edinburgh Scott, D.B.
    • Edinburgh Collingwood, E.F.
    • Edinburgh Graham, T.S.
    • (Edinburgh) From school to university mathematics .
    • Edinburgh Heisenberg, W.K.
    • Edinburgh Gilles, D.C.
    • Edinburgh Smart, R.
    • (Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh) Oliver Heaviside .
    • Edinburgh Neumann, B.H.
    • Edinburgh Bonsall, F.
    • Edinburgh Maxwell, E.A.
    • Edinburgh Green, A.E.
    • Edinburgh Temple, G.
    • (Edinburgh) Baker's property of the Weddle surface .
    • Edinburgh Lord, R.D.
    • Edinburgh Davenport, H.
    • Edinburgh Finney, D.J.
    • Edinburgh Vesselo, I.R.
    • Edinburgh Meltzer, B.
    • (Edinburgh) The mathematics of electron flow .
    • StnAndrews Rutherford Aris (Edinburgh) Some remarks on diffusion problems; .
    • Edinburgh Rankin, R.A.
    • Edinburgh Noble, B.
    • Edinburgh Payne, L.E.
    • Edinburgh Broadbent, T.A.A.
    • Edinburgh Walker, A.G.
    • Edinburgh Jackson, J.M.
    • Edinburgh Aitken, A.C.
    • (Edinburgh) James Stirling .
    • Edinburgh Mackie, A.G.
    • (Edinburgh) Four inequalities in Symmetric functions .
    • Edinburgh Taylor, P.L.
    • Edinburgh Bruck, H.A.
    • Edinburgh Sneddon, I.N.
    • Edinburgh Reuter, G.E.H.
    • Edinburgh Munn, W.D.
    • Edinburgh Smith, J.H.
    • Edinburgh Colombo, S.
    • Edinburgh Martin, D.
    • Edinburgh White, A.J.
    • Edinburgh Hayman, W.K.
    • Edinburgh Land, F.W.
    • Edinburgh Goodstein, R.L.
    • Edinburgh Read, S.
    • Edinburgh Halberstam, H.
    • Edinburgh Swierkowski, S.
    • Edinburgh Quadling, D.A.
    • Edinburgh Giles, R.
    • (Edinburgh) Unexceptional models in algebraic geometry: a survey of recent results .
    • Edinburgh Cox, D.R.
    • Edinburgh Howie, J.M.
    • Edinburgh Donald, D.
    • Edinburgh Everitt, W.N.
    • Edinburgh Rutherford, D.E.
    • Edinburgh Erdelyi, A.
    • (Edinburgh) Axially symmetric potentials .
    • Edinburgh Duncan, J.
    • Edinburgh Sillitto, A.G.
    • Edinburgh Rankin, R.A.
    • (Edinburgh) The stability of a wedge under continuous transformations .
    • Edinburgh(joint with the Edinburgh Mathematical Association) .
    • Edinburgh(joint with the Edinburgh Mathematical Association) .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) The QD algorithm .
    • Edinburgh(joint with the Edinburgh Mathematical Association) .
    • (Edinburgh) A mathematical theory of temporal recall .
    • (SUNY, on leave at Edinburgh) The Hankel transformation of generalized functions .
    • Edinburgh(joint with the Edinburgh Mathematical Association) .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) Aspects of dynamical stability .
    • (Edinburgh) Some pure and applied mathematical problems on the borders of particle and continuum mechanics .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) Singular perturbations .
    • (Edinburgh) Near-rings and groups .
    • (Edinburgh) Integral transforms of generalized functions .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) Operator representations and analogies .
    • Edinburgh(meeting held in memory of the late Professor Arthur Erdelyi) .
    • (Glasgow) (Presidential address) The Edinburgh Mathematical Society - the first fifty years .
    • (Edinburgh) Wiener's Tauberian theorem and the Gaussian semigroup .
    • Edinburgh New Senate Hall (The Centenary Meeting and Dinner)n .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) A contour integral equation .
    • (Edinburgh) Algebraic varieties of matrices .
    • Edinburgh(Joint meeting with the LMS) .
    • (Edinburgh) Fourier analysis of dynamical systems .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) Ap conditions in harmonic analysis .
    • (Edinburgh) An algebraic theory of communicating automata .
    • (Edinburgh) The transfer of inequalities in analysis .
    • (Edinburgh) Brownian motion and stochastic differential equations .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) Evolutes, focal sets, and Morse theory .
    • Edinburgh(Joint meeting with ICMS, Edinburgh) .
    • Edinburgh(EMS/LMS Popular lectures) .
    • Edinburgh(EMS/LMS Popular lectures) .
    • Edinburgh(EMS/LMS Popular lectures) .
    • Edinburgh(EMS/LMS Popular lectures) .
    • (University of Edinburgh) Computing the permanent: a study in Markov chain Monte Carlo .
    • (University of Bath and ICMS Edinburgh) Linking in the calculus of variations .
    • Edinburgh(joint with the British Society for the History of Mathematics) .
    • (Edinburgh) Where do ideas come from? .
    • Edinburgh(Joint meeting with LMS as part of ICMS Hodge Centenary Conference) .
    • (Edinburgh) Sir William Hodge - the man and the mathematician .
    • (Edinburgh) (Presidential address) Variations on Hilbert's matrix .
    • (Edinburgh) How much mass can you put into space without there being too much in any tube, and why do we care? .
    • Edinburgh(125th Anniversary Meeting) .
    • (Edinburgh) The Poincare duality theorem and its converse .
    • Edinburgh(Joint EMS/LMS meeting) .
    • Edinburgh(Presidential address) .
    • (Edinburgh) Analysis, topology and beyond: a reflective perspective on the teaching-research continuum from Bolzano to Guth and Catz .
    • Edinburgh(Joint EMS/LMS meeting) .
    • (Edinburgh) Algorithmic aspects of inference .
    • Edinburgh (Presidential address) .
    • Edinburgh/ .
    • Edinburgh(Popular Lecture) Grime, J.
    • Edinburgh Marsh, R.

  2. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • It contains short accounts of about 200 (mostly) early members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society mainly taken from the 1929 membership list.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society (EMS) is a registered Scottish charity, No.
    • Born 1862 at Edinburgh; Died 1928 .
    • Robert Alladice studied at Edinburgh University and was then appointed assistant to Professor Chrystal there.
    • He left Edinburgh to become Professor at Stanford University in California.
    • Andrew Barclay graduated from Edinburgh University and then taught at George Watson's College in Edinburgh.
    • Robert Ferguson studied at Edinburgh and Heidelberg.
    • He was partner and headmaster of the Edinburgh Institution in George Street where many of the early meetings of the EMS were held.
    • Alexander Yule Fraser graduated from the university of Aberdeen and taught at George Watson's College Edinburgh.
    • Born 1864 at Edinburgh; Died 1942 .
    • Robert Hardie graduated from Oxford and occupied various posts in the Philosophy department of Edinburgh University.
    • Cargill Knott graduated from Edinburgh University and was then an assistant in the Physics department.
    • He returned to a lectureship in Edinburgh and eventually became a Reader in Applied Mathematics.
    • He taught at Madras College St Andrews, at Merchiston Castle School and at Donald Stewart's College in Edinburgh.
    • John Morrison graduated from Edinburgh University and took up a Physics post at Heriot-Watt College.
    • William Peddie graduated from Edinburgh University and then lectured in Physics.
    • Peter Guthrie Tait was a fellow-pupil of Maxwell at Edinburgh Academy and both of them went on to study at Edinburgh University and Cambridge.
    • Tait became Professor of Mathematics at Queen's College Belfast and then moved to the Chair of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh which he occupied for more than 40 years.
    • John S Mackay graduated from St Andrews University and taught at Perth Academy and Edinburgh Academy.
    • John Alison graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at George Watson's College in Edinburgh, He became head of the Glasgow United Free Church Training College and later returned to George Watson's as headmaster.
    • Born 1849 at Leith, near Edinburgh; Died 1933 .
    • John Clark graduated from Edinburgh University and became a teacher at George Heriot's School in Edinburgh.
    • John Wilson graduated from Edinburgh University and trained as a Free Church minister.
    • He took over the Rectorship of his father's Academy in Bannockburn but later moved to Edinburgh as a tutor in mathematics and physics.
    • Born 1863 at Edinburgh; Died 1946 .
    • J Watt Butters graduated from Edinburgh and taught at George Heriot's School and James Gillespie's School in Edinburgh.
    • James Craig graduated from Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • Born 1850 at Edinburgh; Died 1926 .
    • Peter Scott Lang graduated from Edinburgh University and after a period as assistant in Edinburgh he became Regius Professor of Mathematics at St Andrews.
    • Born 1865 at Edinburgh; Died 1935 .
    • He left to teach at George Watson's School in Edinburgh and eventually became Rector of Waid Academy Anstruther.
    • William Thomson graduated from Edinburgh University and then became assistant to Chrystal there.
    • Born 1862 at Edinburgh; Died 1925 .
    • James Archibald graduated from Edinburgh University and eventually became headmaster of Dalry School Edinburgh.
    • He taught for a while at George Watson's College in Edinburgh and the Church of Scotland Training College in Aberdeen before becoming a Schools Inspector.
    • John Carruthers Beattie graduated from Edinburgh University and studied at Munich, Vienna, Berlin and Glasgow.
    • David Tweedie graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at George Watson's College in Edinburgh.
    • Charles Tweedie studied at Edinburgh, Gottingen and Berlin.
    • He returned to Edinburgh as assistant to Chrystal.
    • Born 1871 at Edinburgh; Died 1959 .
    • James Mitchell studied at Edinburgh and Berlin.
    • John Turner graduated from the university of Edinburgh and taught at the Royal High School of Edinburgh.
    • Donald McIntosh graduated from the University of Aberdeen and taught at George Watson's Ladies College in Edinburgh.
    • James Macdonald graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1872 at Edinburgh; Died 1937 .
    • Chrystal Macmillan was the first female science graduate at Edinburgh University and the first female honours graduate in Mathematics.
    • Born 1872 at Leith (near Edinburgh); Died 1934 .
    • George Moffat graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at Dumfries Academy and Glasgow Academy where he became Head of Mathematics.
    • Born 1860 at Leith, Edinburgh; Died 1946 .
    • Alexander Morgan graduated from Edinburgh University and lectured in Mathematics at the Church of Scotland Training College in Edinburgh.
    • William Leslie Thomson studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • He taught at Kirkwall, at Kilmarnock and at George Heriot's School in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1870 at Edinburgh; Died 1926 .
    • David J Tweedie graduated with an Ordinary degree from Edinburgh University and then taught at George Heriot's Hospital School in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1872 at Edinburgh; Died 1955 .
    • Alexander Durie Russell graduated from Edinburgh University at taught at Morelands School Edinburgh, at Stranraer High School and at Falkirk High School where he spent 38 years.
    • Born 1877 at Dalkeith, near Edinburgh; Died 1947 .
    • Alexander Brown studied at Edinburgh and later at Cambridge.
    • Born 1875 at Edinburgh; Died 1958 .
    • Archibald Milne graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at the Church of Scotland Training College in Edinburgh.
    • David Drysdale graduated from Edinburgh University and then taught at George Heriot's School Edinburgh, at the Royal Academy Irvine and at Arbroath High School.
    • Born 1873 at Edinburgh; Died 1943 .
    • Patrick Hardie graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1877 at Edinburgh .
    • David Johnstone graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at Spier's School Beith and George Heriot's School Edinburgh before moving to the Provincial Training College in Edinburgh.
    • Alexander Burgess graduated from Edinburgh and taught at Merchiston Castle School Edinburgh and at Rothesay Academy.
    • Born 1880 at Edinburgh; Died 1950 .
    • George Carse studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge and went on to become a Reader in Physics at Edinburgh.
    • Joseph Wedderburn studied at Edinburgh, Leipzig, Berlin and Chicago.
    • He returned to Scotland to work at Edinburgh but then moved to a post at Princeton where he spent the rest of his career except for a break for service in World War I.
    • William Gentle graduated from the University of Edinburgh and taught at George Heriot's School Edinburgh.
    • Edward Ross studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge universities.
    • Edward Blades graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • He held posts at Moray House Training College, at Heriot Watt College and at George Watson's Ladies' College, all in Edinburgh.
    • Alexander Merriles graduated from Edinburgh University and afterwards taught at Edinburgh Provincial Training College and George Watson's Ladies' College in Edinburgh.
    • Peter Ramsay graduated from Glasgow University and taught at George Watson's School in Edinburgh.
    • Ellice Horsburgh graduated from Edinburgh and became a lecturer in Technical Mathematics at the University.
    • Born 1888 at Edinburgh; Died 1962 .
    • He returned to Edinburgh as a Lecturer in Education before moving to Jordanhill Training College.
    • David Gibb graduated from Edinburgh University and went on to become a lecturer and reader there.
    • Born 1889 at Edinburgh; Died 1975 .
    • Hyman Levy graduated from Edinburgh and went on to study in Gottingen.
    • William Brash graduated from Edinburgh University and went on to teaching posts at Stirling, Aberdeen and Inverness.
    • He became Royal Astronomer of Ireland and moved to Dublin before being appointed to the Chair of Mathematics at Edinburgh where he spent the rest of his career.
    • Charles Barkla was an influential English physicist who became professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh.
    • William Coutts graduated from Edinburgh University and after a period in the Army in World War I he became interested in the mathematical theory of artillery.
    • William Watson graduated in Mathematics and Physics from Edinburgh University.
    • He became head of the Physics department at Heriot Watt College in Edinburgh.
    • Andrew Young graduated from Edinburgh and taught at St Andrews and London Universities.
    • He then trained as a lawyer and worked as a solicitor in Edinburgh for the rest of his career.
    • Robert Dunbar graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • After service in World War I he lectured in Physics at Edinburgh.
    • Lester Ford was an American mathematician who lectured for several years in Edinburgh before moving back to the USA.
    • Pierre Humbert graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris and then moved to Edinburgh to do research under Whittaker.
    • Edward Ince graduated from Edinburgh and researched at Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • He worked at universities in Leeds, Liverpool, Cairo, Edinburgh and Imperial College London before moving back to Edinburgh as Head of Technical Mathematics.
    • After some time in Edinburgh he moved to a post in Statistical Methods and Computation at Leeds.
    • Born 1893 at Edinburgh; Died 1965 .
    • Thomas Brown studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge Universities.
    • Born 1897 at Edinburgh; Died 1988 .
    • Annie Hutton Numbers graduated from Edinburgh University and worked in the Chemistry department in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1896 at Broomieknowe, Lasswade, near Edinburgh .
    • Eleanor Pairman graduated from Edinburgh.
    • Agnes Scott graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • George Lidstone was an actuary who worked for various Edinburgh insurance companies.
    • He taught at the University of Minnesota though he spent a year in Edinburgh in 1919.
    • Nora Calderwood graduated from Edinburgh University and went on to a lectureship at Birmingham University.
    • Born 1895 at Edinburgh; Died 1944 .
    • Thomas Lumsden graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • After service in World War I he spent some time in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1890 at Edinburgh; Died 1963 .
    • After service in World War I he became a lecturer at Edinburgh University and was Secretary of the EMS from 1921 to 1923.
    • David Jack studied at Edinburgh though his studies were interrupted by war service.
    • Balfour Lockhart graduated from Edinburgh University, his studies being interrupted by war service.
    • He taught for most of his career at Edinburgh Academy, finishing as Head of Mathematics.
    • Born 1888 at Leith, near Edinburgh; Died 1955 .
    • John Mackie graduated from Edinburgh University and went on too teach at Leith Academy eventually becoming Rector.
    • Marion Gray graduated from Edinburgh University and then went to Bryn Mawr College in the USA.
    • She completed her doctorate there and returned to posts at Edinburgh and Imperial College London.
    • Edward Copson graduated from Oxford and was appointed a lecturer at Edinburgh.
    • Born 1895 at Edinburgh; Died 1956 .
    • Bernard Childs studied at Birmingham University and then became a lecturer in Physics at Edinburgh University.
    • He lectured on Physics at Manchester and after service in World War I and a period back at Cambridge he became Professor of Physics at Edinburgh.
    • Leslie Frewin graduated from the University of Edinburgh and taught at George Watson's College before moving to Inverness.
    • Barrie Grieve graduated from Edinburgh.
    • Mary Simpson graduated from Edinburgh and then took up a post at Queen's College Dundee.
    • Born 1899 at Edinburgh; Died 1991 .
    • Robert Schlapp studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge universities.
    • He spent his whole career at Edinburgh University teaching mathematics and Physics.
    • He studied at Edinburgh University after World War I and was then given a post there.
    • He lectured at Bangor and Edinburgh before moving back to Oxford.
    • John Williamson graduated from Edinburgh University and then had an appointment at St Andrews.
    • F F P Bisacre was an engineer who was educated at Cambridge and worked for the Edinburgh publishers Blackie with whom he published a Calculus textbook.
    • Born 1895 at Edinburgh; Died 1946 .
    • Leslie Cunningham graduated from Edinburgh University though the First World War interrupted his studies.
    • He worked for the RAF as an education officer but returned to Edinburgh to complete his doctorate.
    • Born 1901 at Edinburgh; Died 1972 .
    • Richard Gwilt was an actuary who worked for various Edinburgh insurance companies.
    • Born 1903 at Edinburgh .
    • Gladys Mackenzie graduated from the University of Edinburgh and became an assistant in the Natural Philosophy department.
    • Mohammed Reda Madwar graduated from Edinburgh University and after a period in Egypt returned to Edinburgh to gain his doctorate in Astronomy.
    • K K Weatherhead graduated from Edinburgh University although his studies were interrupted by service in World War I.
    • He became an actuary, working for various Edinburgh insurance companies.
    • He studied at Edinburgh University and Cambridge.
    • After posts at Edinburgh and Cambridge he became Professor at Liverpool though his tenure was interrupted by service in World War II.
    • Born 1876 at Edinburgh; Died 1943 .
    • Anderson McKendrick trained as a medical doctor in Glasgow and came to Edinburgh as Superintendent of the College of Physicians Laboratory.
    • John Meiklejohn graduated from Edinburgh and taught at Dundee High School.
    • Born 1904 at Edinburgh; Died 1976 .
    • Alexander Buchan graduated from Edinburgh University and worked as a teacher at the Royal High School and Gillespie's High School for Girls in Edinburgh.
    • James Cassels graduated from Edinburgh University and became a teacher at Ayr Academy.
    • George McVittie studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • He then held posts at Leeds, Edinburgh and London and became Professor of Astronomy at the University of Illinois.
    • James Watt was an Edinburgh lawyer and actuary.
    • Harold Ruse graduated from Oxford and held a position at Edinburgh University.
    • Frederick Bath graduated from Bristol and Cambridge and held posts at King's College London, University College Dundee, St Andrews and Edinburgh.
    • James Paton graduated from Edinburgh and spent most of his career at the University finishing as head of the Department of Meteorology.
    • He held a post in Edinburgh for a year before becoming Professor of Pure Mathematics at Queen's College Belfast.
    • Geoffrey Walker studied at Oxford and Edinburgh.
    • William Edge graduated from Cambridge and lectured at Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1860 at Edinburgh; Died 1948 .
    • He became a lecturer in Cambridge before being appointed Professor of Applied Mathematics in Edinburgh where he assembled a distinguished research group mainly of European refugees.
    • He became a lecturer at Edinburgh and after a period in the USA he returned to Edinburgh as a Professor.
    • He became Professor of Astronomy in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1903 at Edinburgh; Died 1975 .
    • William Hodge studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge Universities.

  3. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • It contains short accounts of about 200 (mostly) early members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society mainly taken from the 1929 membership list.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society (EMS) is a registered Scottish charity, No.
    • He studied at Edinburgh University after World War I and was then given a post there.
    • John Alison graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at George Watson's College in Edinburgh, He became head of the Glasgow United Free Church Training College and later returned to George Watson's as headmaster.
    • Born 1862 at Edinburgh; Died 1928 .
    • Robert Alladice studied at Edinburgh University and was then appointed assistant to Professor Chrystal there.
    • He left Edinburgh to become Professor at Stanford University in California.
    • Born 1862 at Edinburgh; Died 1925 .
    • James Archibald graduated from Edinburgh University and eventually became headmaster of Dalry School Edinburgh.
    • Born 1890 at Edinburgh; Died 1963 .
    • After service in World War I he became a lecturer at Edinburgh University and was Secretary of the EMS from 1921 to 1923.
    • Andrew Barclay graduated from Edinburgh University and then taught at George Watson's College in Edinburgh.
    • Charles Barkla was an influential English physicist who became professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh.
    • Frederick Bath graduated from Bristol and Cambridge and held posts at King's College London, University College Dundee, St Andrews and Edinburgh.
    • John Carruthers Beattie graduated from Edinburgh University and studied at Munich, Vienna, Berlin and Glasgow.
    • F F P Bisacre was an engineer who was educated at Cambridge and worked for the Edinburgh publishers Blackie with whom he published a Calculus textbook.
    • Edward Blades graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • He held posts at Moray House Training College, at Heriot Watt College and at George Watson's Ladies' College, all in Edinburgh.
    • He became a lecturer in Cambridge before being appointed Professor of Applied Mathematics in Edinburgh where he assembled a distinguished research group mainly of European refugees.
    • William Brash graduated from Edinburgh University and went on to teaching posts at Stirling, Aberdeen and Inverness.
    • He taught at the University of Minnesota though he spent a year in Edinburgh in 1919.
    • Born 1877 at Dalkeith, near Edinburgh; Died 1947 .
    • Alexander Brown studied at Edinburgh and later at Cambridge.
    • Born 1893 at Edinburgh; Died 1965 .
    • Thomas Brown studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge Universities.
    • Born 1904 at Edinburgh; Died 1976 .
    • Alexander Buchan graduated from Edinburgh University and worked as a teacher at the Royal High School and Gillespie's High School for Girls in Edinburgh.
    • Alexander Burgess graduated from Edinburgh and taught at Merchiston Castle School Edinburgh and at Rothesay Academy.
    • Born 1863 at Edinburgh; Died 1946 .
    • J Watt Butters graduated from Edinburgh and taught at George Heriot's School and James Gillespie's School in Edinburgh.
    • Nora Calderwood graduated from Edinburgh University and went on to a lectureship at Birmingham University.
    • Born 1880 at Edinburgh; Died 1950 .
    • George Carse studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge and went on to become a Reader in Physics at Edinburgh.
    • James Cassels graduated from Edinburgh University and became a teacher at Ayr Academy.
    • Born 1895 at Edinburgh; Died 1956 .
    • Bernard Childs studied at Birmingham University and then became a lecturer in Physics at Edinburgh University.
    • John Clark graduated from Edinburgh University and became a teacher at George Heriot's School in Edinburgh.
    • Edward Copson graduated from Oxford and was appointed a lecturer at Edinburgh.
    • William Coutts graduated from Edinburgh University and after a period in the Army in World War I he became interested in the mathematical theory of artillery.
    • James Craig graduated from Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • Born 1895 at Edinburgh; Died 1946 .
    • Leslie Cunningham graduated from Edinburgh University though the First World War interrupted his studies.
    • He worked for the RAF as an education officer but returned to Edinburgh to complete his doctorate.
    • He lectured on Physics at Manchester and after service in World War I and a period back at Cambridge he became Professor of Physics at Edinburgh.
    • David Drysdale graduated from Edinburgh University and then taught at George Heriot's School Edinburgh, at the Royal Academy Irvine and at Arbroath High School.
    • Robert Dunbar graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • After service in World War I he lectured in Physics at Edinburgh.
    • William Edge graduated from Cambridge and lectured at Edinburgh University.
    • He became a lecturer at Edinburgh and after a period in the USA he returned to Edinburgh as a Professor.
    • Robert Ferguson studied at Edinburgh and Heidelberg.
    • He was partner and headmaster of the Edinburgh Institution in George Street where many of the early meetings of the EMS were held.
    • He lectured at Bangor and Edinburgh before moving back to Oxford.
    • Lester Ford was an American mathematician who lectured for several years in Edinburgh before moving back to the USA.
    • Alexander Yule Fraser graduated from the university of Aberdeen and taught at George Watson's College Edinburgh.
    • Born 1888 at Edinburgh; Died 1962 .
    • He returned to Edinburgh as a Lecturer in Education before moving to Jordanhill Training College.
    • Leslie Frewin graduated from the University of Edinburgh and taught at George Watson's College before moving to Inverness.
    • William Gentle graduated from the University of Edinburgh and taught at George Heriot's School Edinburgh.
    • David Gibb graduated from Edinburgh University and went on to become a lecturer and reader there.
    • Marion Gray graduated from Edinburgh University and then went to Bryn Mawr College in the USA.
    • She completed her doctorate there and returned to posts at Edinburgh and Imperial College London.
    • He became Professor of Astronomy in Edinburgh.
    • Barrie Grieve graduated from Edinburgh.
    • Born 1901 at Edinburgh; Died 1972 .
    • Richard Gwilt was an actuary who worked for various Edinburgh insurance companies.
    • Born 1873 at Edinburgh; Died 1943 .
    • Patrick Hardie graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1864 at Edinburgh; Died 1942 .
    • Robert Hardie graduated from Oxford and occupied various posts in the Philosophy department of Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1903 at Edinburgh; Died 1975 .
    • William Hodge studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge Universities.
    • Ellice Horsburgh graduated from Edinburgh and became a lecturer in Technical Mathematics at the University.
    • Pierre Humbert graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris and then moved to Edinburgh to do research under Whittaker.
    • Edward Ince graduated from Edinburgh and researched at Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • He worked at universities in Leeds, Liverpool, Cairo, Edinburgh and Imperial College London before moving back to Edinburgh as Head of Technical Mathematics.
    • David Jack studied at Edinburgh though his studies were interrupted by war service.
    • Born 1877 at Edinburgh .
    • David Johnstone graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at Spier's School Beith and George Heriot's School Edinburgh before moving to the Provincial Training College in Edinburgh.
    • Cargill Knott graduated from Edinburgh University and was then an assistant in the Physics department.
    • He returned to a lectureship in Edinburgh and eventually became a Reader in Applied Mathematics.
    • Born 1850 at Edinburgh; Died 1926 .
    • Peter Scott Lang graduated from Edinburgh University and after a period as assistant in Edinburgh he became Regius Professor of Mathematics at St Andrews.
    • He left to teach at George Watson's School in Edinburgh and eventually became Rector of Waid Academy Anstruther.
    • Born 1889 at Edinburgh; Died 1975 .
    • Hyman Levy graduated from Edinburgh and went on to study in Gottingen.
    • George Lidstone was an actuary who worked for various Edinburgh insurance companies.
    • Balfour Lockhart graduated from Edinburgh University, his studies being interrupted by war service.
    • He taught for most of his career at Edinburgh Academy, finishing as Head of Mathematics.
    • Born 1895 at Edinburgh; Died 1944 .
    • Thomas Lumsden graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • James Macdonald graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1865 at Edinburgh; Died 1935 .
    • He taught at Madras College St Andrews, at Merchiston Castle School and at Donald Stewart's College in Edinburgh.
    • John S Mackay graduated from St Andrews University and taught at Perth Academy and Edinburgh Academy.
    • Born 1903 at Edinburgh .
    • Gladys Mackenzie graduated from the University of Edinburgh and became an assistant in the Natural Philosophy department.
    • Born 1888 at Leith, near Edinburgh; Died 1955 .
    • John Mackie graduated from Edinburgh University and went on too teach at Leith Academy eventually becoming Rector.
    • Born 1872 at Edinburgh; Died 1937 .
    • Chrystal Macmillan was the first female science graduate at Edinburgh University and the first female honours graduate in Mathematics.
    • Mohammed Reda Madwar graduated from Edinburgh University and after a period in Egypt returned to Edinburgh to gain his doctorate in Astronomy.
    • Donald McIntosh graduated from the University of Aberdeen and taught at George Watson's Ladies College in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1876 at Edinburgh; Died 1943 .
    • Anderson McKendrick trained as a medical doctor in Glasgow and came to Edinburgh as Superintendent of the College of Physicians Laboratory.
    • George McVittie studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • He then held posts at Leeds, Edinburgh and London and became Professor of Astronomy at the University of Illinois.
    • John Meiklejohn graduated from Edinburgh and taught at Dundee High School.
    • Alexander Merriles graduated from Edinburgh University and afterwards taught at Edinburgh Provincial Training College and George Watson's Ladies' College in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1875 at Edinburgh; Died 1958 .
    • Archibald Milne graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at the Church of Scotland Training College in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1871 at Edinburgh; Died 1959 .
    • James Mitchell studied at Edinburgh and Berlin.
    • Born 1872 at Leith (near Edinburgh); Died 1934 .
    • George Moffat graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at Dumfries Academy and Glasgow Academy where he became Head of Mathematics.
    • Born 1860 at Leith, Edinburgh; Died 1946 .
    • Alexander Morgan graduated from Edinburgh University and lectured in Mathematics at the Church of Scotland Training College in Edinburgh.
    • John Morrison graduated from Edinburgh University and took up a Physics post at Heriot-Watt College.
    • After service in World War I he spent some time in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1897 at Edinburgh; Died 1988 .
    • Annie Hutton Numbers graduated from Edinburgh University and worked in the Chemistry department in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1896 at Broomieknowe, Lasswade, near Edinburgh .
    • Eleanor Pairman graduated from Edinburgh.
    • James Paton graduated from Edinburgh and spent most of his career at the University finishing as head of the Department of Meteorology.
    • William Peddie graduated from Edinburgh University and then lectured in Physics.
    • Peter Ramsay graduated from Glasgow University and taught at George Watson's School in Edinburgh.
    • Edward Ross studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge universities.
    • Harold Ruse graduated from Oxford and held a position at Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1872 at Edinburgh; Died 1955 .
    • Alexander Durie Russell graduated from Edinburgh University at taught at Morelands School Edinburgh, at Stranraer High School and at Falkirk High School where he spent 38 years.
    • Born 1899 at Edinburgh; Died 1991 .
    • Robert Schlapp studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge universities.
    • He spent his whole career at Edinburgh University teaching mathematics and Physics.
    • Agnes Scott graduated from Edinburgh University.
    • Born 1849 at Leith, near Edinburgh; Died 1933 .
    • He held a post in Edinburgh for a year before becoming Professor of Pure Mathematics at Queen's College Belfast.
    • Mary Simpson graduated from Edinburgh and then took up a post at Queen's College Dundee.
    • After some time in Edinburgh he moved to a post in Statistical Methods and Computation at Leeds.
    • Peter Guthrie Tait was a fellow-pupil of Maxwell at Edinburgh Academy and both of them went on to study at Edinburgh University and Cambridge.
    • Tait became Professor of Mathematics at Queen's College Belfast and then moved to the Chair of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh which he occupied for more than 40 years.
    • Born 1860 at Edinburgh; Died 1948 .
    • William Thomson graduated from Edinburgh University and then became assistant to Chrystal there.
    • William Leslie Thomson studied at Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • He taught at Kirkwall, at Kilmarnock and at George Heriot's School in Edinburgh.
    • John Turner graduated from the university of Edinburgh and taught at the Royal High School of Edinburgh.
    • Charles Tweedie studied at Edinburgh, Gottingen and Berlin.
    • He returned to Edinburgh as assistant to Chrystal.
    • David Tweedie graduated from Edinburgh University and taught at George Watson's College in Edinburgh.
    • Born 1870 at Edinburgh; Died 1926 .
    • David J Tweedie graduated with an Ordinary degree from Edinburgh University and then taught at George Heriot's Hospital School in Edinburgh.
    • Geoffrey Walker studied at Oxford and Edinburgh.
    • William Watson graduated in Mathematics and Physics from Edinburgh University.
    • He became head of the Physics department at Heriot Watt College in Edinburgh.
    • James Watt was an Edinburgh lawyer and actuary.
    • He taught for a while at George Watson's College in Edinburgh and the Church of Scotland Training College in Aberdeen before becoming a Schools Inspector.
    • K K Weatherhead graduated from Edinburgh University although his studies were interrupted by service in World War I.
    • He became an actuary, working for various Edinburgh insurance companies.
    • Joseph Wedderburn studied at Edinburgh, Leipzig, Berlin and Chicago.
    • He returned to Scotland to work at Edinburgh but then moved to a post at Princeton where he spent the rest of his career except for a break for service in World War I.
    • He became Royal Astronomer of Ireland and moved to Dublin before being appointed to the Chair of Mathematics at Edinburgh where he spent the rest of his career.
    • He studied at Edinburgh University and Cambridge.
    • After posts at Edinburgh and Cambridge he became Professor at Liverpool though his tenure was interrupted by service in World War II.
    • John Williamson graduated from Edinburgh University and then had an appointment at St Andrews.
    • John Wilson graduated from Edinburgh University and trained as a Free Church minister.
    • He took over the Rectorship of his father's Academy in Bannockburn but later moved to Edinburgh as a tutor in mathematics and physics.
    • Andrew Young graduated from Edinburgh and taught at St Andrews and London Universities.
    • He then trained as a lawyer and worked as a solicitor in Edinburgh for the rest of his career.

  4. EMS Members
    • Below is a list of the 275 Members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1929 with their addresses at that time.
    • AITKEN, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.E., Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh .
    • JOHN ALISON, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.E., 126 Craiglea Drive, Edinburgh .
    • BENNETT, M.A., B.Sc., 2 Chesser Avenue, Edinburgh .
    • BLACK, M.A., B.Sc., Trinity Academy, Edinburgh .
    • EDWARD BLADES, M.A., B.Sc., 1 Lockharton Crescent, Edinburgh .
    • BOYLE, M.A., Buchanan Hostel, East Suffolk Road, Edinburgh .
    • BUCHAN, B.Sc., Gillespie's School, Edinburgh .
    • BUTTERS, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.S.E., 116 Comiston Drive, Edinburgh .
    • CARSE, M.A., D.Sc., Reader in Natural Philosophy, The University, Edinburgh .
    • CHILDS, Ph.D., Lecturer in Natural Philosophy, The University of Edinburgh .
    • PETER COMRIE, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.S.E., 19 Craighouse Terrace, Edinburgh .
    • COPSON, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.E., The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh (Hon.
    • CUNNINGHAM, M.A., 38 Buckingham Terrace, Edinburgh .
    • DARWIN, M.A., F.R.S., Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy, The University, Edinburgh .
    • DOUGALL, M.A., 23 Cargill Terrace, Trinity, Edinburgh .
    • EDWARDS, M.A., Fettes College, Edinburgh .
    • FREWIN, M.A., George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • FULTON, M.A., B.Sc., Edinburgh Ladies College, Queen Street, Edinburgh .
    • GENTLE, B.Sc., F.R.S.E., George Heriot's School, Edinburgh .
    • DAVID GIBB, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.S.E., The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh (Hon.
    • GOLDIE, M.A., F.R.S.E., 6 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh .
    • GRIEVE, M.A., D.Sc., H.M.I.S., 16 Orchardhead Road, Liberton, Edinburgh .
    • GWILT, F.I.A., F.F.A., c/o Scottish Widows' Fund, 9 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh .
    • HARDIE, M.A., B.Sc., Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh .
    • HARDIE, M.A., Reader in Ancient Philosophy, University, Edinburgh .
    • C.E., Reader in Technical Mathematics, The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh .
    • JOHNSTONE, M.A., B.Sc., Provincial Training College, Edinburgh .
    • LIDSTONE, LL.D., F.I.A., F.F.A., F.R.S.E., 9 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh .
    • LOCKHART, M.A., B.Sc., 33 Boswall Crescent, Edinburgh (Hon Treasurer) .
    • Miss EVE MACBEAN, M.A., 20 Warrender Park Crescent, Edinburgh .
    • RODERICK McCALLUM, M.A., B.Sc., Edinburgh Ladies College, Queen Street, Edinburgh .
    • McKENDRICK, M.D., The College of Physicians Laboratory, Forrest Road, Edinburgh .
    • McTAGGART, M.A., 15 Blinkbonny Grove, Edinburgh .
    • MATSON, M.A., 67 Arden Street, Edinburgh .
    • MERRILES, M A., B.Sc., George Watson's Ladies College, Edinburgh .
    • ARCHIBALD MILNE, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.E., Depute Director, Provincial Training College, Edinburgh .
    • MILDRED MOORE, M.A., 24 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh .
    • MORRISON, M.A., B.Sc., 5 Kilmaurs Terrace, Edinburgh .
    • MUDIE, M.A., 12 Bruntsfield Crescent, Edinburgh .
    • NUMBERS, M.A., 6 Ventnor Terrace, Edinburgh .
    • JAMES PATON, M.A., The Natural Philosophy Department, The University, Edinburgh .
    • EDWARD PHILIP, M.A., H.M.I.S., 17 South Gillsland Road, Edinburgh .
    • RUSE, B.A., The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh .
    • ROBERT SCHLAPP, M.A., Ph.D., The Natural Philosophy Department, The University, Edinburgh .
    • SEN, M.A., The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh .
    • SHEARER, M.A., B.Sc., 28 Strathearn Road, Edinburgh .
    • SHEPLEY, M.A., Scottish Provident Assurance Co., Edinburgh .
    • JOHN GRAHAM THOMSON, 34 London Street, Edinburgh .
    • THOMSON, M.A., George Heriot's School, Edinburgh .
    • JOHN TURNER, M.A., B.Sc., Royal High School, Edinburgh .
    • DAVID TWEEDIE, M.A., B.Sc., 34 Newbattle Terrace, Edinburgh .
    • HENRY WALKER, M.A., D.Sc., 5 Saughtonhall Terrace, Edinburgh .
    • WATSON, M.A., B.Sc., Heriot Watt College, Edinburgh .
    • JAMES WATT, LL.D., W.S., F.F.A., F.R.S.E., Craiglockhart House, Slateford, Edinburgh .
    • WEATHERHEAD, M.A., F.F.A., 19 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh .
    • EDMUND TAYLOR WHITTAKER, Sc.D., F.R.S., Professor of Mathematics, The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh .
    • WHITTAKER, M.A., D.Sc., The Mathematical Institute, The University, Edinburgh .
    • Black, 24 PoIworth Gardens, Edinburgh .
    • YOUNG, M,A., 4 Admiral Terrace, Edinburgh .

  5. The EMS: the first hundred years
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society: the first hundred years .
    • As part of the Centenary celebrations of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the Committee of the Society invited Professor Robert Rankin to write a history of the Society.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society: the first hundred years (1883-1983) .
    • The London Mathematical Society (1865), the Moscow Mathematical Society (1867), the Societe Mathematique de France (1873), the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1883) and the New York Mathematical Society (later American Mathematical Society) (1888) were all founded in this period.
    • By contrast, the stimulus for the foundation of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society came from school teachers, and, in particular, from two mathematical masters at George Watson's College in Edinburgh, Alexander Yule Fraser (an M.A.
    • of Edinburgh).
    • In conjunction with Dr Cargill Gilston Knott (1856-1922), who was then Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, they issued the following circular 'to gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge and throughout Scotland generally whom they deemed likely to take an interest in such a Society'.
    • EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY, .
    • It is suggested that the Society be formed, in the first instance, of all those who shall give in their names on or before February 2, 1883, and who are (1) present or former students in either of the Advanced Mathematical Classes of Edinburgh University, (2) Honours Graduates in any of the British Universities, or (3) recognised Teachers of Mathematics; and that, after the above mentioned date, members be nominated and elected by ballot in the usual manner.
    • As indicated in the letter, the preliminary meeting was held in the Mathematics Class Room, Edinburgh University, on Friday, 2nd February 1883, at 8 p.m.
    • To quote from the minutes: 'The Chairman, in his introductory remarks, mentioned that Professor P G Tait (Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh University) had suggested that the Society regard itself as the resuscitation of the Physico-Mathematical Society, which had led a vigorous existence during the years 1836-39, had revived at subsequent intervals, but finally collapsed in 1850, leaving behind it, however, a library, some fragmentary apparatus, and a ballot-box'.
    • This suggestion, however, was not taken up and those present at the meeting turned their attention to a series of eight motions setting up the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, its aim being the mutual improvement of its members in the mathematical sciences, pure and applied.
    • He was chief mathematical master at The Edinburgh Academy and was an able mathematician with a scholarly interest in the early Greek geometers.
    • One motion that was carried unanimously was that Professor Tait and Professor Chrystal (his colleague in the chair of mathematics at Edinburgh University) be elected Honorary Members.
    • The Society now meets regularly in all eight Scottish Universities and joint meetings with the London Mathematical Society have been held in Edinburgh and Newcastle.
    • During its first two sessions the Society met in Edinburgh University, but moved in the autumn of 1884 to the Edinburgh Institution in Queen Street.
    • This was the ordinary venue of meetings until June 1913, when the Society returned to Edinburgh University.
    • The first meeting outside Edinburgh was held in March 1900 in the Glasgow Philosophical Society's rooms, during the presidency of R F Muirhead, who was a Glasgow man.
    • During the 1939-1945 war, meetings were usually held on Saturday mornings in Edinburgh.
    • During its first session the Edinburgh Mathematical Society had not enough money to do this, and so copies of papers read were deposited with the Secretary.
    • By 1909 it was felt that the more elementary and pedagogic articles should not appear in the Proceedings and, at Professor G A Gibson's suggestion, it was agreed "to issue at stated intervals a supplement to the Proceedings dealing with the teaching of Mathematics and Science, the supplement to be called 'Mathematical Notes, a review of Elementary Mathematics and Science, published by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society' ".
    • The older of the two was, of course, the late Sir Edmund Whittaker (1873-1956), who was Professor of Mathematics at Edinburgh from 1912 to 1946.
    • In essence his scheme was that the Proceedings should be retained for research papers, but that the Society should publish in place of the Mathematical Notes a new periodical, to be called the Journal of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, which would contain articles on History, Methods of Teaching, Notes, Discussions on Elementary Mathematics, etc.
    • It was then agreed to expand the Mathematical Notes, and a change of name to the Journal of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was again suggested.
    • Some members objected to the title Journal of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society on the grounds that it would clash with the recently founded Journal of the London Mathematical Society and other names were suggested such as Bulletin of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and Scottish Mathematical Journal.
    • It may be of interest to mention that the possibility of an amalgamation of the Edinburgh Proceedings with the Proceedings of the Glasgow Mathematical Association (now the Glasgow Mathematical Journal to form a new Scottish Mathematical Journal was discussed in 1965, the view being that such a journal would carry greater prestige than either of its constituents since it would be of greater size and might appear more frequently.
    • For a variety of reasons this proposal was not taken up, largely because it would have cut by about half the mathematical journals received under exchange agreements by the Glasgow and Edinburgh University Libraries.

  6. EMS Founder Members
    • Founder Members of Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in February 1883.
    • Assistant to the Professor of Mathematics, University, Edinburgh .
    • Master at George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • Professor of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh .
    • United Presbyterian Divinity Hall, Edinburgh (later Rev) .
    • student at University of Edinburgh .
    • C.E., 13 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh .
    • Headmaster of the Institution, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • student of Logic at Edinburgh .
    • Law student at Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh .
    • Examiner in Mathematics, University, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, The Academy, Edinburgh .
    • Lecturer on Mathematics, Watt's Institute, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • Rev., Mathematical Master, Ladies' College, George Square, Edinburgh .
    • student at Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, High School, Edinburgh .
    • Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy, Edinburgh .
    • George Watson's College, Edinburgh .
    • St Andrew Square, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, Ladies' College, Queen Street, Edinburgh .
    • Professor of Natural Philosophy, University of Edinburgh .
    • Student in Divinity, Edinburgh .
    • Mathematical Master, The Academy, Edinburgh .

  7. Scotland in 1883 and the EMS
    • Scotland in 1883 and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • In 1883 there were four universities in Scotland: the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow and St Andrews.
    • We also see which of these students became involved in the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • One of the students graduating in 1881 was Alexander Yule Fraser, who was a Boxill Mathematical Prizeman, and went on to become a mathematics master at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, and was one of the three signatories of the letter proposing to set up the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Another graduating in the same year was John Jack who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society November 1895 when Professor of Mathematics at Wilson College, Bombay.
    • W Cooper Dickson, one of the First Class students of 1882 was a founder member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, joining in February 1883 while training for ministry in the Church.
    • Edinburgh .
    • At Edinburgh George Chrystal is the professor of mathematics in 1883.
    • In 1882 one student graduated from Edinburgh with an M.A.
    • with Honours in Mathematics, namely R Edgar Allardice who graduated First Class in 1882, joined Edinburgh Mathematical Society as a founder member in February 1883, and became Assistant to the Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh.
    • In the following year of 1883 three students graduated from Edinburgh with an M.A.
    • Two, who were both awarded First Class degrees, became members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • One of the First Class students was Robert Franklin Muirhead who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in February 1884.
    • Of the Second Class students, one was James Hamilton, who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in April 1885 when a Mathematical Master at Kensington Grammar School, London.
    • He was John Weir who was awarded First Class Honours and joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1884 when at St Peter's College, Cambridge.
    • At St Andrews the Regius Professor of Mathematics in 1883 is R P Scott Lang who was appointed in 1879 to replace George Chrystal who, after two years as Regius Professor had moved to Edinburgh.
    • One of these students was R C Buist, who joined Edinburgh Mathematical Society in December 1884.
    • One of these students was David Rintoul who joined the Edinburgh Mathematical Society as a founder member in February 1883 when he was at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.
    • Mathematics in Edinburgh University in 1883 .
    • In 1883 the University of Edinburgh had an "Ordinary Certificate in Arts for Women" and an "Honour Certificate in Arts for Women".
    • Candidates, before they can receive the certificates, must have studied in at least three of the Classes of the "Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women," that are recognised by the Senatus Academicus; and they must also have passed the Local Examinations of the University of Edinburgh, or of one of the other Scottish Universities, or of the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge.
    • classes of the University of Edinburgh in 1896.
    • was popular since by 1885 the centres were Aberdeen, Barbados, Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Cheltenham, Edinburgh, Eisenach, Halifax, Hildesheim, Leicester, Lerwick, Liverpool, London, Paris, Pietermaritzburg, and St Andrews.

  8. Edinburgh Mathematical Notes
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Notes .
    • Below the title appears: "Published by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society", and "Edited by P PInkerton, George Watson's College, Edinburgh." The contents of this first part are as follows: .
    • All contributions and communications referring to "Mathematical Notes" should be addressed to P Pinkerton, George Watson's College, Edinburgh.
    • The Annual Subscription to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society is 7s 6d for ordinary members, who receive copies of Mathematical Notes and also of the Proceedings of the Society.
    • P Comrie, M.A., B.Sc., 19 Craighouse Terrace, Edinburgh.
    • Secretary, 19 Craighouse Terrace, Edinburgh.
    • Secretary had become P Ramsay, M.A., B.Sc., 63 Comiston Drive, Edinburgh.
    • D.Sc., F.R.S.E., Mathematical Department, Edinburgh University, and the annual subscription to the Society was increased from 7s 6d to 10s.
    • Secretary of the Society as E T Copson, B.A., F.R.S.E., Mathematical Department, Edinburgh University.
    • The name of the journal was then changed to "The Edinburgh Mathematical Notes".
    • "The Edinburgh Mathematical Notes" was then moved to appear as part of the Proceedings.
    • The Society publishes the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society which contains papers embodying the results of research that is original in matter or manner and a section entitled Notes containing material of a less sophisticated nature.
    • This new form of the Notes only survived for a few years with the last Notes appearing at the end of Part 2 of Volume 15 of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (1966-67).
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/ems/Edinburgh_maths_notes.html .

  9. EMS 1913 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium 1913 .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium, organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, began on Monday 4 August 1913.
    • It was held in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 1 .
    • The Mathematical colloquium organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society this year for the first time, began its meetings yesterday in the rooms of the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.
    • The Committee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society have been successful in getting well-known authorities to deliver the courses of lectures.
    • Professor A W Conway, of the National University of Ireland, is taking for his subject "The Theory of Relativity and the New Physical Ideas of Space and Time;" Dr Sommerville, of St Andrews University, lectures on "Non-Euclidean Geometry and the Foundations of Geometry;" and Professor Whittaker, Edinburgh University, gives a course of five lectures and demonstrations on "Practical Harmonic Analysis and Periodogram Analysis." By the courtesy of the University Court, several rooms have been set aside as reception and writing rooms, and these have been furnished for the comfort and convenience of members of the colloquium.
    • The social side has also been attended to, and yesterday afternoon the members were invited to tea at the Edinburgh University Union, while for the remaining evenings of the week golf matches have been arranged at various courses in the neighbourhood.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 2 .
    • The meetings of the Colloquium, organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, were resumed yesterday in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 3 .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium continued its meetings yesterday in the mathematical department of Edinburgh University.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 4 .
    • The meetings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium were continued yesterday in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 5 .
    • The Colloquium, held last week under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society came to on end on Friday.

  10. EMS 1938 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held its fourth St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 4 to 15 July 1938.
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a Mathematical Colloquium is being held in the University Hall, St Andrews, Scotland, from July 4th to 15th, 1938.
    • The year 1938 is the three hundredth anniversary of the birth of James Gregory, who held in succession the Chairs of Mathematics in St Andrews and Edinburgh Universities; and the occasion will be celebrated in the following ways in connection with the Colloquium.
    • The Royal Society of Edinburgh will hold a commemoration of James Gregory in their Rooms at 22 George Street, Edinburgh, on the afternoon of Monday, July 4th.
    • A paper on Neglect of Form and Law in School Algebra will be offered for debate by George Lawson, M.A., President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society; and other discussions of School Mathematics will be arranged if there is demand for them.
    • The 300th anniversary of the birth of James Gregory, who held in succession the Chairs of Mathematics in St Andrews and Edinburgh Universities, will be celebrated at a Mathematical Colloquium to be held in St Andrews from July 4 to 15, 1938, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • A discussion of school mathematics will be opened by Mr George Lawson, president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • The opening meeting, which will be a commemoration of James Gregory, will be held in conjunction with the Royal Society of Edinburgh in their rooms at 22 George Street, Edinburgh, on the afternoon of July 4.
    • secretary of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society is at 16 Chambers Street.
    • In connection with the James Gregory tercentenary the Edinburgh Mathematical Society are holding a Colloquium in St Andrews this week and next.
    • Dr A C Aitken, of Edinburgh, dealt with "Invariant Matrices and the Symmetric Group." Dr W O Kermack.
    • Edinburgh, spoke on "Aspects of Mathematical Biology." .
    • One of the papers read to the Colloquium (on Saturday 9 July) was by George Lawson, president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • At the St Andrews Mathematical Colloquium, which is being held in connection with the James Gregory Tercentenary at University Hall, St Andrews, Mr George Lawson, president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, on Saturday night submitted for debate a paper on "Neglect of Form and Law in School Algebra." He said that by the British Association papers last year, it was indicated that algebra had, during the last 30 years, developed on the lines of Sir Percy Nunn's classical exposition.
    • The full reference is I M H Etherington, Edinburgh Mathematical Society: St Andrews Colloquium, The Mathematical Gazette 22 (252) (December 1938), 482-484.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY: .
    • The Colloquium associated itself in various ways with the name of James Gregory, born 300 years ago, who held in succession the Chairs of Mathematics in the Universities of St Andrews and Edinburgh.
    • The opening meeting on July 4 was held in Edinburgh in conjunction with the James Gregory Tercentenary Meeting of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Mr George Lawson, the President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and Chairman of the Colloquium, addressed himself mainly to school teachers, who formed a not inconsiderable proportion of the membership.

  11. EMS
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883.
    • However the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was rather different from the other societies since it was founded by school teachers rather than by university teachers.
    • The initial idea came from two mathematics teachers at George Watson's College in Edinburgh, namely A Y Fraser and A J G Barclay.
    • Together with Cargill G Knott, assistant to the professor of physics at the University of Edinburgh P G Tait, they sent out a letter dated 23 January 1883:- .
    • to gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge, and throughout Scotland generally whom we deem likely to take an interest in such a Society..
    • on Friday 2 February 1883 in the Mathematics Classroom of Edinburgh University.
    • The first president, elected at the meeting, was J S Mackay, the head mathematics master at The Edinburgh Academy.
    • George Chrystal, the professor of mathematics at Edinburgh University, and Peter Guthrie Tait, the professor of natural philosophy, were elected honorary members of the Society at this first meeting.
    • In 1884 the Society began publication of the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Although initially an Edinburgh Society, it very soon extended its remit to cover Scotland.
    • The Society held its first meeting outside Edinburgh when it met in Glasgow in March 1900.
    • George Chrystal, one of the Society's first honorary members, died in 1911 and in the following year Edmund Whittaker took up Chrystal's chair in Edinburgh.
    • Almost immediately he encouraged the Edinburgh Mathematical Society to hold a mathematical colloquium which it did in Edinburgh in 1913.
    • A second colloquium was held in Edinburgh in the following year, prior to the outbreak of World War I, but the series had to be discontinued for the duration of the War.
    • Turnbull was appointed Regius Professor of Mathematics in the United College of St Salvator and St Leonard at the University of St Andrews in 1921 and he was enthusiastic that the Edinburgh Mathematical Society should resume its Colloquium but that the venue should be St Andrews.

  12. 50 years of the EMS
    • Fifty years of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • The fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was celebrated on Friday 3 February 1933.
    • Minutes of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • on Friday, 3rd February, 1933, in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Society, at the Caledonian Hotel, Edinburgh.
    • Proposing the toast of "The Founders of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society," Professor D'Arcy W Thompson, F.R.S., read extracts from a letter he had received from Mr A J G Barclay, the only surviving member of the original group of founders.
    • Professor D'Arcy W Thompson, Professor R A Sampson (Secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh), and Dr James Robb (Secretary of the Carnegie Trust).
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY.
    • A dinner was held last night at the Caledonian Hotel, Edinburgh, to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the foundation of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • In January 1883 a circular letter was sent to Scottish mathematicians by the late Dr C G Knott, a Lecturer of the University of Edinburgh; Mr A J G Barclay, Glasgow High School; and Mr A Y Fraser, George Watson's College, Edinburgh, proposing that a Society should be established for the advancement of mathematical science in Scotland.
    • In the following month the first meeting was held and the Society formally constituted, Dr John S Mackay, a master at Edinburgh Academy, being elected president.
    • One of the ordinary members was the present president of the Society Mr William Peddie, who at that time was a Lecturer in Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh, and is now Professor of Physics at University College, Dundee.
    • During the session 1884-85 it was resolved to publish a periodical, The Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, containing an account of the Mathematical research performed by the members.
    • In spite, however, of its international character, the Society remains peculiarly Scottish in its activities, and sets an example to similar bodies south of the Tweed by holding attractive and well-attended meetings in Edinburgh and elsewhere for the delivery of lectures on topics of scientific and educational interest.
    • Moreover, it is unique among British Mathematical or physical societies in that it organises colloquia, every few years in St Andrews or Edinburgh, thus providing a medium for the exchange of ideas and an opportunity to mathematicians to form friendships with others of similar interests.
    • Others present included Mr R A Robb, vice-president; Dr James Robb, secretary of the Carnegie Trust; Professor R A Sampson, F.R.S., secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh; Professor E T Whittaker, F.R.S., and Mrs Whittaker; Professor H W Turnbull, F.R.S.; Mrs C G Darwin, Dr T B Clark, Dr G J Lidstone, and Dr J Alison.

  13. EMS 1914 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium 1914 .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society followed the success of their 1913 Colloquium with another in the following year.
    • The Forthcoming Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium, The Mathematical Gazette 7 (111) (May 1914), 346-347.
    • THE FORTHCOMING EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL COLLOQUIUM.
    • The successful Colloquium which was held in Edinburgh last August was described in the October number of the Gazette, and the suggestion was there made that a Colloquium should be held in the same city in the present year, in conjunction with the Napier Tercentenary Celebrations.
    • This suggestion has been adopted by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, who have now resolved to hold an open Colloquium on July 28th to 31st inclusive, immediately following the Napier celebrations on July 24th to 27th.
    • (Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh), on THE SOLUTION OF ALGEBRAIC AND TRANSCENDENTAL EQUATIONS IN THE MATHEMATICAL LABORATORY.
    • The fee for the whole Colloquium is 15s., and should be sent to the Honorary Secretary of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (P Comrie, M.A., B.Sc., 19 Craighouse Terrace, Edinburgh).
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 1 .
    • The colloquium held under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society opened its meetings yesterday in the University Buildings, Edinburgh under the presidency of Dr Sommerville, St Andrew University.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 2 .
    • At the second day's proceedings of the colloquium yesterday under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, Professor d'Ocagne, Paris, continued his exposition of the nomographic principle, and discussed its application to spherical trigonometry.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium Day 3 .
    • At the third day's proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium yesterday, Mr Richmond commenced his lecture by criticising Cayley's statement with reference to the distinction between projective and metrical geometry.

  14. LMS Newsletter article
    • LMS Newsletter article on the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • The following article about the activities of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society written by Colin M Campbell and Edmund F Robertson, appeared in the London Mathematical Society Newsletter in November 2016: .
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Along with the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, the London Mathematical Society, the Operational Research Society and the Royal Statistical Society, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (EMS) is a member of the Council for the Mathematical Sciences.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 to provide its members, the majority of whom were schoolteachers, with lectures on advanced mathematics.
    • Each year the Edinburgh Mathematical Society has a programme of about eight or nine lectures in Edinburgh and around Scotland.
    • Indeed the authors of this note acknowledge the generous support and encouragement of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for the Groups St Andrews series of conferences.
    • Another important activity of the Society is the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Every four years the Whittaker prize, named after Sir Edmund Whittaker formerly Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, is awarded to a leading mathematician with Scottish connections.
    • Whittaker was President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in 1914-15 and President of the London Mathematical Society in 1928-29.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society celebrated its centenary in 1983 and there were also special events in 2008 for one hundred and twenty-five years of the Society.
    • As well as some joint meetings with the London Mathematical Society, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held a joint meeting with the Catalan Mathematical Society in 2015.
    • In Scotland the Society has strong links with ICMS, the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences, in Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh Math.

  15. The EMS: the first 100 years (1883-1983) Part 2
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society: the first hundred years (1883-1983) Part 2 .
    • As part of the Centenary celebrations of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the Committee of the Society invited Professor Robert Rankin to write a history of the Society.
    • When Whittaker came to the Edinburgh chair in 1912 after Chrystal's death he soon began to inject fresh vitality into his department.
    • It was held from 4-8 August 1913 in Edinburgh University.
    • A second short colloquium was held in Edinburgh in July 1914 immediately after the Napier Tercentenary Celebration organized by the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Before the 1914-19 war in May of three successive years 1911, 1912 and 1913 one-day Secondary Education Congresses were held in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Dundee, respectively, for those interested in the teaching of mathematics.
    • Peter Guthrie Tait (1831-1901), who was a school-fellow of James Clerk Maxwell at Edinburgh Academy, was a distinguished Professor of Natural Philosophy with very wide interests.
    • This was the textbook my father used when he was in Chrystal's first year class at Edinburgh University.
    • On his return in 1891 he was appointed to one of the first Lectureships in Edinburgh University and later become a Reader.
    • Later on he became General Secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was the editor of the Napier tercentenary volume and of the collected papers of P G Tait.
    • In 1912 he came to Edinburgh to succeed George Chrystal as Professor of Mathematics.
    • Whittaker's institution of a Mathematical Laboratory at Edinburgh University has already been mentioned.
    • He, his older colleague Professor J E A Steggall of Dundee and Dr Robin Schlapp of Edinburgh are the only members of our Society who have served three times as President.
    • He held lectureships in Glasgow and Birmingham for brief periods and tutorships in London, Edinburgh and Glasgow, but never held any permanent position worthy of his talents.

  16. EMS 1913 Colloquium
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society 1913 Colloquium .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium, organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, began on Monday 4 August 1913 and ran throughout that week.
    • It was held in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL COLLOQUIUM .
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a Mathematical Colloquium was held in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University during the week beginning Monday, 4th August, 1913, lasting five days.
    • A Course of Five Lectures and Demonstrations by E T Whittaker, Esq., Sc.D., F.R.S., Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, on Practical Harmonic Analysis and Periodogram Analysis; an Illustration of Mathematical Laboratory Practice.
    • The full reference is C G Knott, The Edinburgh Mathematical Colloquium, The Mathematical Gazette 7 (107) (October 1913), 165-167.
    • THE EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL COLLOQUIUM .
    • The first Mathematical Colloquium held in Edinburgh met during the first week of August, and proved a great success.
    • It was organised by the office-bearers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, A G Burgess, M.A., F.R.S.E., and Peter Comrie, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.S.E., respectively the President and Secretary of that Society, being also President and Secretary of the Colloquium.
    • The idea of holding such a colloquium was an outcome of Professor Whittaker's announcement that he purposed organising, as part of the Mathematical Honours curriculum in the University of Edinburgh, a mathematical laboratory for systematic numerical discussion of functions and methods of calculation.
    • Reminiscences of college days in Cambridge, Dublin, and Edinburgh formed the nucleus of a varied gossip, which had usually a certain mathematical flavour.

  17. EMS 1930 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held its second St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 19 to 30 July 1930.
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a Mathematical Colloquium will be held in St.
    • Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh.
    • Lecturer in Actuarial Science in the University of Edinburgh.
    • Copson, Cowan House, George Square, Edinburgh.
    • The report of the meeting given below is from the Minute Book of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society: .
    • The Colloquium was welcomed to St Andrews by Principal Sir James Irvine, F.R.S., on behalf of St Andrews University, and by the President on behalf of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society a Mathematical Colloquium is being held at the University Residence Hall, St Andrews, from 19th to 30th July.
    • Professor Whittaker, Edinburgh, returned thanks for the welcome.
    • Tracing the development of the Colloquium, he said it had been held at Edinburgh in 1913 and 1914, and in 1926 at St Andrews, and now it was being held again this year at St Andrews.
    • The following will be the course of lectures and the lecturers:- "Rational Curves and Surfaces," by H F Baker, F.R.S., Lowndean Professor of Astronomy and Geometry in the University of Cambridge; "Arithmetical Properties of Curves and Surfaces," by H W Richmond, F.R.S., Fellow of King's College, Cambridge; "The Wave Mechanics," by C G Darwin, F.R.S., Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh; "Elementary Mathematics from the Higher Standpoint," by H W Turnbull, M.A., Professor of Mathematics in the United College, St Andrews; "Recent Developments in Symmetric Functions, Determinants and Algebraic Equations," by A C Aitken, D.Sc., Lecturer in Actuarial Science, University of Edinburgh.
    • The University of St Andrews Library put on an exhibition associated with the St Andrews Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • The Mathematical Colloquium, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, which opened at St Andrews on 19th July, was concluded yesterday.
    • In addition to the courses of lectures given by Professor H F Baker, Cambridge; Dr H W Richmond, Cambridge: Professor C G Darwin, Edinburgh; Dr A C Aitken, Edinburgh, and Professor H W Turnbull, St Andrews, there were several special meetings addressed by Professor E T Whittaker, Edinburgh: Dr B van der Pol, Philips Radio Research Laboratory, Holland; Dr G C M'Vittie, Cambridge; Dr W H M'Crea, Edinburgh: Professor C A Noble, California; Professor D'Arcy Thompson, St Andrews; and Professor E C Titchmarsh, Liverpool.

  18. EMS honours Maxwell and Tait
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society honours Maxwell and Tait .
    • On Friday 4 December 1931, 100 years after the birth of James Clerk Maxwell and Peter Guthrie Tait, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held a meeting in their honour:- .
    • Dr W H M'Crea delivered a lecture "James Clerk Maxwell and Peter Guthrie Tait" to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in the Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University yesterday.
    • It was particularly fitting that their memory should be honoured by Edinburgh, to which they both belonged by birth and upbringing.
    • They were, together at the Edinburgh Academy, and both later had distinguished careers at the Universities of Edinburgh and Cambridge.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society took special pride in the memory of Tait.
    • In 1860 he was elected to the Chair of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh.
    • Guests at yesterday's meeting were Bishop Reid of Edinburgh and Mrs Reid, and Mr J C Tait and Miss Tait.
    • F.R.S., and Mrs Whittaker, E M Horsburgh and Dr E Lindsay Ince, Edinburgh University; Dr W 0 Kermack.
    • Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh; Professor D M Y Sommerville.
    • Glasgow University: Mr J A Macdonald, H.M.I., Peebles; and Mr H F Rose and Mr Andrew Young, Edinburgh.

  19. EMS/SCM
    • Joint meeting of the EMS and SCM (Societat Catalana de Matematiques) in Edinburgh in September 2017 .
    • Smoktunowicz, Agata (University of Edinburgh) One-generator braces and indecomposable solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation .
    • Sierra, Susan (University of Edinburgh) Overrings of Sklyanin algebras .
    • Iyudu, Natalia (University of Edinburgh) Sklyanin algebras via Groebner bases and finiteness conditions for potential algebras .
    • Zapata Carratala, Carlos (University of Edinburgh) A unifying picture for the reduction of geometric structures .
    • Strickland-Constable, Charles (University of Edinburgh/Universite Paris-Saclay) Generalised geometry and supersymmetric solutions .
    • Gondzio, Jacek (University of Edinburgh) Continuation in Optimization: From interior point methods to Big Data .
    • Davie, Alexander (University of Edinburgh)Multivariate Cornish-Fisher expansions and optimal transport .
    • Oh, Tadahiro (University of Edinburgh) On singular stochastic dispersive PDEs .
    • Miao, Zhouqian (University of Edinburgh) Front propagation in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with a cut-off .
    • Salkeld, William (University of Edinburgh) Large deviation principles for McKean Vlasov equations .
    • Neelima, Neelima (University of Edinburgh) Lp-estimates and higher regularity for semilinear SPDEs with monotone semilinearity .

  20. EMS honours James Leslie
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society honours James Leslie .
    • On Friday 4 November 1932, 100 years after the death of James Leslie, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held a meeting in his honour:- .
    • EDINBURGH TRIBUTE.
    • The centenary of the death of Sir James Leslie the noted Scottish mathematician and natural philosopher, was commemorated yesterday by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, at their opening meeting of the session in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh.
    • The Society took as read four formidable papers on modern mathematics in order to devote its meeting to the centenary celebrations, the main feature of which was a lecture delivered by Dr E M Horsburgh, Reader in Technical Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh.
    • Sir James Leslie was Professor of Mathematics in Edinburgh University from 1805 until 1819, and Professor of Natural Philosophy from 1819 until his death in 1832.
    • Science applied to engineering had run in each generation of this branch of the Leslie family, and the nephew of Sir John founded Leslie & Reids, civil engineers, one of whose activities had been to give to Edinburgh a water supply second to none in the world.
    • At an early age he met Playfair, the future professor of mathematics in Edinburgh.
    • In 1805 at the ago of 39 he was first favourite for the Chair of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh, from which his friend, Professor Playfair, had been translated to the Chair of Natural Philosophy.
    • The Edinburgh ministers were suspected of endeavouring to secure a monopoly of the Philosophical Chairs, and they accused Leslie of atheism from a note in his work on heat.

  21. EMS Centenary Dinner
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Centenary Dinner .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the Fourth Ordinary Meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the New Senate Hall, Old College, University of Edinburgh, at 5.00 p.m.
    • The dinner was held in the Upper Library Hall, Old College, University of Edinburgh at 7.30 p.m., preceded by a reception from 7.00 p.m.The Chair was occupied by the President, Professor A B Mackie (Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh).
    • (President of the London Mathematical Society), Dr J H Burnett (Principal of the University of Edinburgh), Sir John Atwell, (President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh), and Professor W L Edge, (Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh).
    • Responding to the toast, the President thanked Professor Sneddon for his kind remarks and proceeded to thank the University of Edinburgh through the Principal for provision of rooms and services, the speaker, guests and organisers of the dinner.

  22. EMS 125
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society 125 Anniversary Meeting .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the 125th Anniversary Meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held at the University of Edinburgh at 3 p.m.
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1980, to the Royal Society of London in 1989, to Foreign Membership of the French Academy of Sciences in 2000 and to Foreign Membership of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in 2007.
    • He is a former President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society and, most recently, the International Mathematical Union, where he has strongly supported the advancement of mathematics in developing countries.
    • In addition, he holds Honorary Doctorates from the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, the University of Montpellier II, the University of Sussex, the University of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt University (where he was for many years a professor).
    • He was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1979, to the Royal Society of London in 1985, to a Fellowship of the Institute of Biology in 1988 and to the Foreign Membership of the French Academy of Sciences in 2000.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society History .
    • At the end of the talk, a vote of thanks was given by Professor Tony Carbery of the University of Edinburgh.

  23. Napier Tercentenary
    • On July 24th to 27th, 1914, there will be held a celebration, under the auspices of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, of the tercentenary of the publication of Napier's Mirifici Logarithmorum Canonis Descriptio, the work which embodies the discovery of logarithms.
    • Immediately following the Napier celebration, a Mathematical colloquium will be held on July 28th to 31st under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • of Scotland raised a loan of money from Alexander Napier, who was the Provost of Edinburgh in 1437, and had pledged the lands of Merchiston, originally part of the Crown demesne, in mortgage for the repayment of the loan.
    • Mr J Parker Smith and Mrs Parker Smith; Professor D'Arcy Thomson, Dundee; Professor Thomas, Charleston, U.S.A.; Professor S Tscherny, Warsaw: Professor Westergaard, Edinburgh; and Professor Whittaker, Edinburgh.
    • The talks of Monday 27 July, together with a report on the social programme and the forthcoming Colloquium organised by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society were reported by The Scotsman on Tuesday 28 July 1914.
    • CLOSING MEETINGS IN EDINBURGH.
    • The members of the Napier Tercentenary Congress met again in Edinburgh University yesterday forenoon.
    • RECEPTION BY THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH.
    • A farewell reception was given to the members of the Napier Tercentenary Congress by the President and Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in the rooms of the Society, George Street, yesterday afternoon, and was largely attended by the ladies and gentlemen who have taken part in the celebration.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL COLLOQUIUM.
    • The success attending the Colloquium held under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society last year encouraged the Society to hold a similar meeting this year.
    • By the courtesy of the Edinburgh University Court, the meetings will be held in the Mathematical Department of the University, and will last from today till Friday.

  24. Chrystal: EMS Address
    • Chrystal addresses the first Edinburgh Mathematical Society meeting .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883 and the preliminary meeting of the Society was held in the Mathematics Class Room, Edinburgh University, on Friday, 2nd February 1883, at 8 p.m.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY.
    • THE EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY.
    • At the first ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, held last night in the Mathematical Class-room of the University, Professor Chrystal delivered an address on the present fields of mathematical research.
    • So clamant did that want appear to him to be that for several winters back - more particularly this winter - he had been thinking of trying to start something in Edinburgh in the nature of a mathematical seminary.

  25. EMS 125 Dinner
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society 125 Anniversary Dinner .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the 125th Anniversary Meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held at the University of Edinburgh at 3 p.m.
    • Professor Sir Michael Atiyah, University of Edinburgh, Honorary Member of the Society and President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Professor Michael Singer, Head of the School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society 125th Anniversary Dinner .

  26. Colloquium photo 1913
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in Edinburgh in 1913 .

  27. EMS Erdelyi
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of A Erdelyi .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the fourth ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held on Friday 20 January 1978 and from minutes of the third ordinary meeting held on 1 December 1978 which was held in memory of the late Professor Arthur A Erdelyi, F.R.S.
    • Before introducing the speaker Professor I N Sneddon at the December meeting the President (Professor R A Rankin) spoke of the service which Professor Erdelyi had given to the Society over a period of almost forty years, from his arrival in Edinburgh from Europe in 1939 till his sudden death almost exactly a year ago.
    • He spoke first of Erdelyi's early life in Hungary and Czechoslovakia and of his arrival in Edinburgh just before the outbreak of the Second World War.
    • Professor Sneddon then went on to describe the three main periods of Erdelyi's life: his first spell in Edinburgh under Professor Whittaker, his period at Caltech and his work on the Bateman Manuscript Project, and finally his return to Edinburgh as Professor Aitken's successor.

  28. EMS/SCM
    • Gyongy, Istvan (University of Edinburgh) On stochastic partial differential equations of parabolic type .
    • Wright, Jim (University of Edinburgh) Lebesgue Constants: connections with pointwise ergodic theorems .
    • Dindos, Martin (University of Edinburgh) The equivalence of BMO solvability of the Dirichlet problem for parabolic equations with A∞ condition for the parabolic measure .
    • Gimperlein, Heiko (Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh) Nonclassical spectral asymptotics of commutators .
    • Hwang, Sukjung (University of Edinburgh) The Dirichlet boundary problem for second order parabolic operators satisfying Carleson condition .
    • Antal, Tibor (University of Edinburgh) Multitype branching processes: from bacteria to cancer .
    • Popovic, Nikola (University of Edinburgh) A geometric analysis of fast-slow models for stochastic gene expression .
    • Foss, Sergey (Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh) Limit theorems for random directed graphs .
    • Lord, Gabriel (Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh) Stochastic travelling waves and computation .
    • Sabanis, Sotirios (University of Edinburgh) Explicit numerical schemes for SDEs driven by Levy noise and for Stochastic Evolution Equations .

  29. EMS session 5
    • The fifth session of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • On Friday 12 November 1886 the Edinburgh Mathematical Society began its fifth session.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • The first meeting of the fifth session of this Society was held last night in the Edinburgh Institution - Dr R M Ferguson, president, in the chair.

  30. EMS Whittaker Prize
    • The following is taken from the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Committee Minute Book.
    • Sir Edmund Whittaker died in Edinburgh on 24 March, 1956.
    • He had been Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh from 1912 to 1946 and was an Honorary Member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • A meeting of the Society which was addressed by Professor Temple, F.R.S., was held in the Mathematical Institute, 16 Chambers Street, Edinburgh, on Friday, 17th May 1957, to commemorate Sir Edmund's work.
    • The Committee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society considered this matter at a meeting held in the Master's Room, St Salvator's College, St Andrews, on Saturday, 1 June 1957.
    • The awards will be made by the Committee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society on the recommendation of a standing Committee (hereafter the Prize Committee) consisting of the Professors of Mathematics in the four Scottish Universities and the Professor of Mathematics in the Royal College of Science and Technology (ex officio).
    • Meetings of the Prize Committee will be arranged at appropriate times by the Secretary of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • The Committee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society may, at the request of the Prize Committee, waive any of the above rules in cases which merit special consideration.

  31. EMS Edge
    • Honorary Edinburgh Mathematical Society Member: W L Edge .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the Fourth Ordinary Meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the New Senate Hall, Old College, University of Edinburgh, at 5.00 p.m.
    • The President referred to the Committee's nomination for Honorary Membership of Professor W L Edge, being conscious of his immense contributions to Mathematics and, in the words of the special minute of the Senatus of the University of Edinburgh on his retirement in 1975: .

  32. EMS Presidents
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society - Presidents .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883.
    • on Friday 2 February 1883 in the Mathematics Classroom of Edinburgh University.

  33. EMS Copson Atiyah
    • Honorary Edinburgh Mathematical Society Members: E T Copson and M F Atiyah .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the eighth ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in St Andrews on Friday 2 June 1979: .
    • The President then shook hands with Professor Copson, who was present at the meeting, and admitted him as an Honorary Member with the words "In the name of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, I admit you as a Honorary Member thereof".

  34. EMS Treasurers
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society - Honorary Treasurers .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883.
    • on Friday 2 February 1883 in the Mathematics Classroom of Edinburgh University.

  35. EMS Aitken
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of A C Aitken .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the second ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held on Friday 10 November 1967: .
    • He sometimes spoke of his first afternoon in Edinburgh when 44 years ago, "a raw New Zealander", as he chose to describe himself , he was hospitably entertained by Sir Edmund Whittaker.

  36. EMS Centenary meeting
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Centenary Meeting .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the Fourth Ordinary Meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the New Senate Hall, Old College, University of Edinburgh, at 5.00 p.m.

  37. EMS Secretaries
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society - Honorary Secretaries .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883.
    • on Friday 2 February 1883 in the Mathematics Classroom of Edinburgh University.

  38. EMS Centenary
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Centenary Meeting .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the Fourth Ordinary Meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the New Senate Hall, Old College, University of Edinburgh, at 5.00 p.m.

  39. EMS Honorary Members
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society - Honorary Members .
    • The list given is of Honorary Members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  40. EMS Copson
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society: Death of E T Copson .
    • The following is an extract from the minutes of the sixth ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held on Friday 7 March 1980: .

  41. EMS 1934 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held its third St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 18 to 28 July 1934.
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a Mathematical Colloquium is being held in the University Hall, St Andrews.
    • The full reference is G C McVittie, Edinburgh Mathematical Society: St Andrews Colloquium, The Mathematical Gazette 18 (230) (October 1934), 248-249.
    • An identical report is included in the Minute Book of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY: ST ANDREWS COLLOQUIUM.
    • The Colloquium held at St Andrews from July 18 to 28 by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society was the third such meeting held since the War and proved as successful as on previous occasions.
    • A like interest was displayed in the discussion on Geometry led by Professor J G Semple (Belfast), Dr Timms (St Andrews) and Mr W L Edge (Edinburgh), who, taking a theorem in the theory of three associated quartic curves, each gave a proof of it from a different angle.

  42. Colloquium photo 1980
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1980 .

  43. Colloquium photo 1972
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1972 .

  44. EMS 1964
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1964 .

  45. Colloquium photo 1988
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1988 .

  46. Colloquium photo 1976
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1976 .

  47. Colloquium photo 1996
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1996 .

  48. EMS 1955 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held its second St Andrews Colloquium after World War II in St Andrews from 6 to 16 July 1955.
    • Professor Alec C Aitken (Edinburgh) - "Numerical Analysis and Algebra." .
    • The St Andrews Mathematical Colloquium of Edinburgh Mathematical Society began on Wednesday at St Andrews.
    • The meeting opened with an address by Professor A C Aitken, Edinburgh, on "Numerical Analysis and Algebra." A series of five lectures is being given during the next week by Mr M F Atiyah, Cambridge, on "Topological Methods in Algebraic Geometry.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society is organising a gathering, which will take place in St Andrews from 13th to 23rd July 1955.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Committee Minutes.

  49. Colloquium photo 1934
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1934 .

  50. Colloquium photo 1964
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1964 .

  51. EMS 1926 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the second of its Edinburgh Colloquia in 1914.
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a Mathematical Colloquium will be held in St Andrews from 3rd August to 13th August, 1926.
    • The Founding of Edinburgh University.
    • The Founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • The report of the meeting given below is from the Minute Book of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society: .

  52. Colloquium photo 1992
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1992 .

  53. Colloquium photo 1955
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1955 .

  54. EMS 1980
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1980 .

  55. Colloquium photo 1984
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1984 .

  56. EMS 1992 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 11 to 18 July 1992.
    • (b) Professor A (Sandy) M Davie (Edinburgh), - "Nonlinear dynamics, real and complex." .
    • (e) Professor Elmer G Rees (Edinburgh) - "Critical points of functions on bundles." .
    • (h) Professor Allan M Sinclair (Edinburgh) - analysis seminars.
    • From the Edinburgh Mathematical Society General Council Minutes.
    • The following are from the General Council papers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society from October 1992: .

  57. EMS 1972 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 12 to 22 July 1972.
    • St Andrews is a small town (by now its population must be about 12,000) 35 miles north-east of Edinburgh, looking out on the North Sea.
    • Once every four years - in leap years to be exact - the Edinburgh Mathematical Society holds a colloquium in St Andrews.
    • From the minutes of the First Ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for session 1972-73: .
    • From the Minutes of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Committee.
    • I first met Frank Harary in 1972 when he was one of the plenary speakers at the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews.

  58. Colloquium photo 1951
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1951 .

  59. Colloquium photo 1959
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1959 .

  60. Colloquium photo 1938
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1938 .

  61. EMS 1955
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1955 .

  62. Colloquium photo 1930
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1930 .

  63. Colloquium photo 1968
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1968 .

  64. EMS 1972
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1972 .

  65. Colloquium photo 1926
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1926 .

  66. EMS 1926
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Colloquium in St Andrews in 1926 .

  67. EMS 1959 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held its third St Andrews Colloquium after World War II in St Andrews from 8 to 18 July 1959.
    • (e) Dr Robert Schlapp (Edinburgh) - "Newton and some Scottish contemporaries." .
    • Under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society it is proposed to hold a Colloquium in University Hall, St Andrews, from 8th July to 18th July 1959.
    • Prof H S M Coxeter (Toronto), Prof V C A Ferraro (London), Prof C Lanczos (Dublin), Dr A P Robertson (Glasgow) and Dr R Schlapp (Edinburgh) have kindly consented to deliver short courses of lectures.
    • A successful and enjoyable Colloquium was held in St Andrews from July 8 to July 18, 1959, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and was attended by about 80 members.

  68. EMS Levi-Civita
    • Tullio Levi-Civita wrote to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society on 12 June 1930: .
    • of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Edinburgh .
    • I am deeply indebted to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for the great honour accorded to me by the election to an honorary fellow.

  69. 1883 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .
    • The minutes are preceded by a short description of how the Society came to be, including the original letter of invitation that was sent to "gentlemen in Edinburgh, in Cambridge and throughout Scotland generally" whom the initiators deemed likely to take an interest in such a society.
    • Motion 1: That a Society be instituted called the Edinburgh Mathematical Society; and that its aim shall be the Mutual Improvement of its Members in the Mathematical Sciences, pure and applied.

  70. EMS 1968 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 10 to 20 July 1968.
    • (c) Professor Frank F Bonsall (Edinburgh) - "Normed Algebras." .
    • I was invited to give a course of lectures at the St Andrews Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society has arranged a colloquium at St.

  71. EMS 1951 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held its first St Andrews Colloquium after a gap of thirteen years caused by World War II.
    • A Mathematical Colloquium under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society will be held at the University of St Andrews on July 18-28, 1951.
    • In pre-war years the periodical Mathematical Colloquia held in St Andrews by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society were deservedly popular with mathematicians from this country and abroad.
    • A feature of pre-war British Mathematics was revived in St Andrews this summer when the Edinburgh Mathematical Society organised a successful Mathematical Colloquium.

  72. EMS 1980 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 9 to 19 July 1980.
    • (i) Professor Elmer G Rees (Edinburgh) - Topology seminars.
    • Colin Campbell's report to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • He made a report to the First Ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in session 1980-81.

  73. EMS 1976 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 14 to 24 July 1976.
    • From the minutes of the First Ordinary meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for session 1976-77: .
    • give a positive answer to a conjecture made by Professor Kaplansky in his final lecture to the St Andrews Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in July, 1976.
    • In his final lecture to the 1976 St Andrews Colloquium of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, Professor Kaplansky introduced the concept of a Jordan C*-algebra [and] pointed out its potential importance ..

  74. 1883 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society shall consist of Ordinary and Honorary Members.

  75. 1911-12 May (2) meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • A Secondary Education Congress was held in Edinburgh on this Saturday, and at 3:30 there was a meeting, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, of those interested in the teaching of mathematics.

  76. Chrystal EMS tribute
    • At the meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the Edinburgh Institution, 8 Queen Street on Friday 10 November with Mr John Turner, president, in the chair the following motion was ordered to be inscribed in the minutes: .
    • The members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society hereby record their deep sorrow for the death of Professor Chrystal.

  77. 1901-02 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • Miller, James N: "On an instrument for trisecting any angle", [Title] [An account of this instrument will be found in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol.

  78. 1898-99 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • Chair: Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh .

  79. EMS Lawson Ince
    • The deaths of Mr George Lawson and Dr Edward Lindsay Ince were reported to the meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh, on Friday 2 May 1941.
    • Professor Whittaker went on to describe Dr Ince's distinguished contributions to mathematics, referring in particular to his famous textbook on Differential Equations, and to his latest paper on Lame Functions whose merits had been recognised by the award of the Makdougall-Brisbane prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  80. 1887-88 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • John Sturgeon Mackay intimated that the Mathematical Society of France was engaged in the preparation of a classified bibliography of periodicial mathematical literature and invited the cooperation of members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  81. 1884-85 July meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • A hearty vote of thanks to Dr Robert McNair Ferguson for the use of rooms in the Edinburgh Institution was moved by the president and heartily accorded.

  82. 1884-85 Jul meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • A hearty vote of thanks to Dr Robert McNair Ferguson for the use of rooms in the Edinburgh Institution was moved by the president and heartily accorded.

  83. EMS 1996 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 13 to 20 July 1996.
    • From the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Minutes.
    • The following are from the General Council papers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society from October 1996: .

  84. 1893-94 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • Brown, Alexander Crum: "On the division of a parallelepiped into tetrahedra without making new corners", [A fuller investigation will be found in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol.

  85. 1886-87 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • A vote of thanks was passed to Dr Robert MacNair Ferguson for his continued kindness in granting the society a comfortable meeting place in the Edinburgh Institution.

  86. EMS 1988 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 13 to 20 July 1988.
    • From the Edinburgh Mathematical Society General Council Minutes.
    • The department hosted the Edinburgh Mathematical Society St Andrews Colloquium from 13-20 July, 1988 with Drs J K Langley and J J O'Connor serving as colloquium secretaries.

  87. EMS 1964 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 15 to 25 July 1964.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society will hold a Colloquium in St Andrews from 15th to 25th July, 1964.
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society Committee Minutes.

  88. 1918-19 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • "The Edinburgh Mathematical Society desires to place on record its sense of the loss it has sustained through the death of Mr Walter Borland, F.F.A., A.I.A., one of the most conspicuous among the younger actuaries in Edinburgh.

  89. EMS Mackie
    • Report in The Scotsman on 5 February on Dr John Mackie's lecture to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society given in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh on Friday 4 February 1938.
    • A revision of the methods of school teaching of mathematics was urged by Dr John Mackie, rector of Leith Academy Secondary School, at a meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society held at the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, last night.

  90. 1912-13 May (1) meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • The society decided to hold a colloquium in Edinburgh during the summer vacation, and to invite Professor Conway of Dublin, Dr Sommerville of St Andrews and Professor Whittaker of Edinburgh to deliver short courses of lectures.

  91. 1911-12 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • A Secondary Education Congress was held in Edinburgh on this Saturday, and at 3:30 there was a meeting, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, of those interested in the teaching of mathematics.

  92. 1890-91 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • A hearty vote of thanks was given to Robert McNair Ferguson for his kindness in granting the society the use of his rooms in the Edinburgh Institution.

  93. 1899-00 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • Wallace in his "Geometrical Theorems and Analytical Formulae", published in Edinburgh in 1839.

  94. 1886-87 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .
    • Taylor, James: "Some correspondence between Robert Simson, professor of mathematics in the University of Glasgow, and Matthew Stewart, professor of mathematics in the University of Edinburgh", [Title] [This correspondence was published in Vol.

  95. 1894-95 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  96. 1890-91 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  97. 1893-94 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  98. 1893-94 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  99. 1897-98 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  100. 1885-86 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  101. 1886-87 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  102. 1893-94 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  103. 1887-88 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  104. 1888-89 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  105. 1883 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  106. 1898-99 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  107. 1888-89 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  108. 1890-91 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  109. 1886-87 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  110. 1885-86 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  111. 1894-95 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  112. 1900-01 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  113. 1892-93 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  114. 1889-90 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  115. 1884-85 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  116. 1887-88 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  117. 1883-84 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  118. 1931-32 Dec meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .
    • A C Aitken, the president, welcomed the guests who had honoured the society by their presence that evening, namely the Bishop of Edinburgh, Mrs Reid, Mr J G Tait and Miss Tait.

  119. 1883-84 Jul meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  120. 1899-00 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  121. 1897-98 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  122. 1895-96 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  123. 1896-97 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  124. 1901-02 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  125. 1892-93 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  126. 1901-02 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  127. 1887-88 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  128. 1893-94 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  129. 1883-84 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  130. 1894-95 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  131. 1884-85 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  132. 1886-87 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  133. 1887-88 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  134. 1884-85 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  135. 1901-02 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  136. 1899-00 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  137. 1892-93 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  138. 1889-90 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  139. 1886-87 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  140. 1900-01 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  141. 1883 July meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  142. 1890-91 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  143. 1896-97 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  144. 1891-92 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  145. 1898-99 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  146. 1901-02 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  147. 1903-04 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • Since last meeting a special meeting of the committee and of certain ex-presidents had been held in connection with a proposal to obtain the use of the Royal Institution Building wholly and exclusively for Scottish Scientific Societies, and that application was to be made on behalf of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  148. 1885-86 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  149. 1891-92 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  150. 1896-97 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  151. 1883-84 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  152. 1897-98 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  153. 1898-99 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  154. 1883-84 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  155. 1883-84 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  156. 1900-01 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  157. 1897-98 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  158. 1897-98 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  159. 1883-84 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  160. 1888-89 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  161. 1885-86 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  162. 1896-97 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  163. 1900-01 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  164. 1896-97 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  165. 1891-92 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  166. 1883 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  167. 1896-97 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  168. 1891-92 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  169. 1890-91 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  170. 1894-95 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  171. 1888-89 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  172. 1893-94 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  173. 1887-88 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  174. 1908-09 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • It was to be called "Mathematical Notes, a review of elementary mathematics and science, published by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society", and it would be issued at stated intervals.

  175. 1897-98 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  176. 1899-00 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  177. 1888-89 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  178. 1908-09 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • It was agreed to alter the time of the meetings held in Edinburgh from eight to half past seven o'clock, as the secretary had suggested at the previous meeting.

  179. 1896-97 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  180. 1891-92 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  181. 1891-92 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  182. 1898-99 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  183. 1913-14 Colloquium meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • Social arrangements included tea at the University union, golf matches, and visits to the Zoological Gardens, the Census office and the new laboratories at George Heriot's School and at Edinburgh University.

  184. 1889-90 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  185. 1894-95 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  186. 1892-93 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  187. 1886-87 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  188. 1884-85 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  189. 1883 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  190. 1887-88 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  191. 1883-84 July meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  192. 1895-96 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  193. 1889-90 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  194. 1925-26 Nov meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .
    • Many of the present members had been his pupils at George Watson's College, Edinburgh.

  195. 1891-92 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  196. 1888-89 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  197. 1890-91 June 2 meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  198. 1900-01 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  199. 1895-96 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  200. 1889-90 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  201. 1888-89 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  202. 1893-94 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  203. 1885-86 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  204. 1901-02 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  205. 1892-93 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  206. 1885-86 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  207. 1911-12 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • "The members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society hereby record their deep sorrow for the death of Professor Chrystal.

  208. 1890-91 June (2) meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  209. 1883 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  210. 1898-99 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  211. 1893-94 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  212. 1912-13 Colloquium meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • Social arrangements included tea at the University union, golf matches, and visits to the Zoological Gardens, the Census office and the new laboratories at George Heriot's School and at Edinburgh University.

  213. 1890-91 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  214. 1885-86 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  215. 1894-95 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  216. 1894-95 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  217. 1884-85 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  218. 1889-90 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  219. 1896-97 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  220. 1892-93 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  221. 1889-90 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  222. 1905-06 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • A sub-committee appointed by the committee was instructed to make arrangements for housing the library of the society in the Mathematical Department of Edinburgh University.

  223. 1890-91 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  224. 1902-03 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .
    • The secretary intimated that Mr Turner, the headmaster of the Institution, was willing to allow the society the continued use of the Edinburgh Institution Rooms.

  225. 1895-96 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  226. 1900-01 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  227. 1894-95 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  228. 1898-99 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  229. 1892-93 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  230. 1930-31 Rules meeting
    • 1: The Edinburgh Mathematical Society shall consist of Ordinary and Honorary Members.
    • 10: The Society shall publish two periodicals, the 'Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society' and the 'Mathematical Notes', which shall be issued as frequently as the Committee considers expedient.

  231. 1883 Jul meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  232. 1884-85 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  233. 1895-96 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  234. 1899-00 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  235. 1883-84 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  236. 1887-88 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  237. 1884-85 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  238. 1889-90 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  239. 1923-24 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • The Societe Mathematique de France was to hold their fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the society in Paris from May 22nd to 24th, and had sent a letter requesting representatives from the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  240. 1883-84 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  241. 1884-85 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  242. 1892-93 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  243. 1930-31 meeting
    • 1: The Edinburgh Mathematical Society shall consist of Ordinary and Honorary Members.
    • 10: The Society shall publish two periodicals, the 'Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society' and the 'Mathematical Notes', which shall be issued as frequently as the Committee considers expedient.

  244. 1885-86 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  245. 1891-92 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  246. 1887-88 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  247. 1894-95 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  248. 1886-87 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  249. 1886-87 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  250. 1913-14 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .
    • "The members of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society hereby record their deep sorrow for the death of Dr John Mackay.

  251. 1899-00 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  252. 1888-89 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  253. 1890-91 Jul meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  254. 1895-96 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  255. 1890-91 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  256. 1889-90 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  257. 1883-84 Apr meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh, the Mathematical Class Room, Edinburgh University .

  258. 1890-91 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  259. 1892-93 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  260. 1884-85 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  261. 1885-86 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  262. 1893-94 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  263. 1891-92 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  264. EMS 2003 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 30 June to 5 July 2003.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society's President (Professor T A Gillespie) wrote in his Newsletter: .

  265. EMS Mobius
    • A peculiar configuration known as a "Mobius Surface" figured in a paper read last night at a meeting of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh.

  266. EMS William Taylor
    • A lively discussion was provoked last night by Mr William Taylor, lecturer at Moray House Training College, in an address which he gave to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh.

  267. EMS Freundlich
    • Report on Finlay Freundlich's lecture to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society given in the Department of Natural Philosophy, Edinburgh, on Saturday 3 February 1940.

  268. EMS Arithomometer
    • That "logarithms have had their day" was the conclusion expressed by the president of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, Professor R O Street, at a meeting of the Society in the United College, St Andrews, on Saturday afternoon.
    • The election of Professor E T Whittaker, F.R.S., as an honorary member of the Society was carried unanimously, marking the twenty-fifth year of his tenure of the Chair of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, and in recognition of many services to the Society.

  269. Colloquia photographs
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society ran Colloquia in Edinburgh in 1913 and 1914.

  270. EMS school mathematics
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society met in the Department of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh on Saturday 2 March 1940.

  271. EMS Rutherford
    • Report on Dan Rutherford's lecture to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society given in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh, on Saturday 1 November 1941.

  272. EMS Ruse
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society met at 6.15 p.m.
    • on Friday 6 November 1936 in the Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh.

  273. EMS teaching
    • On 5 February 1944 the Edinburgh Mathematical Society met in 16 Chambers Street, Edinburgh.

  274. Colloquia photographs
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society ran Colloquia in Edinburgh in 1913 and 1914.

  275. EMS Ince
    • Report on Edward Lindsay Ince's lecture to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society given in the Mathematical Institute, Chambers Street, Edinburgh, on Friday 3 May 1940.

  276. 1888-89 April meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution, Edinburgh .

  277. 1903-04 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  278. 1902-03 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  279. 1920-21 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  280. 1912-13 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  281. 1921-22 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  282. 1927-28 Feb meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  283. 1903-04 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  284. 1907-08 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  285. 1916-17 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  286. EMSWhittakerPrize.html
    • After the death of Sir Edmund Whittaker in 1956 his son John Whittaker most generously gave on behalf of the Whittaker Family the sum of £500 to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society to establish a prize for mathematical work in memory of his father.

  287. 1912-13 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  288. 1924-25 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  289. 1929-30 Feb meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  290. 1913-14 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  291. 1917-18 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  292. 1917-18 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  293. 1904-05 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  294. 1902-03 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  295. EMS 1984 Colloquium
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society held the St Andrews Colloquium in St Andrews from 25 July to 4 August 1984.

  296. 1918-19 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  297. 1908-09 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  298. 1907-08 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  299. 1909-10 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  300. 1917-18 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  301. 1905-06 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  302. 1931-32 Jan meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  303. 1912-13 May (2) meeting
    • A Secondary Education Congress was held on this Saturday, and at 3:30 pm there was, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a meeting of those interested in the teaching of mathematics.

  304. 1918-19 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  305. 1919-20 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  306. 1919-20 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  307. 1904-05 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  308. 1930-31 Nov meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  309. 1910-11 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  310. 1906-07 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  311. 1915-16 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  312. 1910-11 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  313. 1921-22 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  314. 1919-20 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  315. 1904-05 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  316. 1904-05 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  317. 1929-30 Jan meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  318. 1927-28 Jan meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  319. 1917-18 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  320. 1912-13 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  321. 1925-26 Feb meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  322. 1928-29 Jan meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  323. 1923-24 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  324. 1909-10 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  325. 1930-31 Feb meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  326. 1905-06 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  327. 1922-23 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  328. 1916-17 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  329. 1909-10 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  330. 1913-14 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  331. 1913-14 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  332. 1903-04 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  333. 1924-25 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  334. 1929-30 Nov meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  335. 1905-06 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  336. 1904-05 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  337. 1931-32 Nov meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  338. 1929-30 May meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  339. 1921-22 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  340. 1917-18 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  341. 1918-19 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  342. 1923-24 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  343. 1904-05 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  344. 1906-07 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  345. 1915-16 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  346. 1903-04 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  347. 1907-08 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  348. 1909-10 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  349. 1922-23 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  350. 1924-25 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  351. 1917-18 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  352. 1919-20 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  353. 1916-17 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  354. 1909-10 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  355. 1911-12 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  356. 1910-11 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  357. 1906-07 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  358. 1907-08 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  359. 1930-31 Jan meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  360. 1908-09 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  361. 1920-21 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  362. 1925-26 Mar meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  363. 1931-32 May meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  364. 1922-23 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  365. 1916-17 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  366. 1927-28 Nov meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  367. 1923-24 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  368. 1912-13 May meeting
    • A Secondary Education Congress was held on this Saturday, and at 3:30 pm there was, under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, a meeting of those interested in the teaching of mathematics.

  369. 1902-03 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  370. 1919-20 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  371. 1911-12 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  372. 1910-11 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  373. 1928-29 Feb meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  374. 1914-15 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  375. 1914-15 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  376. 1922-23 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  377. 1928-29 Nov meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  378. 1914-15 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  379. 1902-03 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  380. 1906-07 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  381. 1906-07 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  382. 1915-16 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  383. EMS Roll of Honour for World War I
    • The following Roll of Honour was printed in the Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Vol XXXVII, Session 1918-1919 in pages vi-vii: .

  384. 1910-11 May meeting
    • A Secondary Education Congress was held in Glasgow University on this Saturday, and at 3:30 p.m., under the auspices of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, there was a meeting of those interested in the teaching of mathematics.

  385. 1903-04 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  386. 1908-09 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  387. 1917-18 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  388. 1918-19 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  389. 1915-16 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  390. 1916-17 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  391. 1930-31 May meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  392. 1911-12 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  393. 1902-03 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  394. 1924-25 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  395. 1908-09 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  396. 1918-19 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  397. 1925-26 Jan meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  398. 1906-07 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  399. 1907-08 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  400. 1918-19 Dec meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  401. 1911-12 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  402. 1920-21 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  403. 1916-17 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  404. 1911-12 May (1) meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  405. 1914-15 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  406. 1905-06 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  407. 1927-28 May meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  408. 1910-11 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  409. 1907-08 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  410. 1913-14 Mar meeting
    • The society resolved to hold a short colloquium in Edinburgh immediately after the Napier Tercentenary Celebration in July.

  411. 1909-10 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  412. 1920-21 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  413. 1928-29 May meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  414. 1920-21 Mar meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  415. 1905-06 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  416. 1931-32 Feb meeting
    • Location: Mathematical Institute, Edinburgh University .

  417. 1913-14 Jan meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  418. 1916-17 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  419. 1912-13 Jun meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh Institution .

  420. 1914-15 May meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  421. 1915-16 Nov meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .

  422. 1921-22 Feb meeting
    • Location: Edinburgh University .


BMC Archive

  1. Minutes for 2010
    • Edinburgh .
    • Maxwell Institute, Edinburgh (2010): .
    • Immediate impressions of the Edinburgh joint BMC/BAMC meeting .
    • Minutes for the meeting of 7 April 2010 at 2b Appleton Tower, Edinburgh .
    • Maxwell Institute, Edinburgh (2010) Jim Howie, Michael Singer .
    • Impressions of the Edinburgh joint BMC/BAMC meeting .

  2. Minutes for 1999
    • Prof A Carbery (Edinburgh), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Prof J Howie (Heriot-Watt University), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Dr P Rowlinson (Stirling), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • It was explained that the Edinburgh Mathematical Society holds an emergency fund for the BMC.
    • There will be Special Sessions in Harmonic maps and minimal surfaces organised by Prof J C Wood (Leeds) and Dr J Bolton (Durham), and in Operator Algebras, organised by Prof E C Lance (Leeds) and Prof A M Sinclair (Edinburgh).
    • Prof Dales reported that there might be a workshop in Operator Algebras at the ICMS in Edinburgh, immediately before the 52nd BMC, but that funding applications to the EU and to EPSRC had been unsuccessful.
    • Prof Scholl suggested that Prof E Rees (Edinburgh) of the LMS Research Meetings Committee for workshops be approached.

  3. Scientific Committee 2007
    • Invitation to Edinburgh accepted at the AGM in Swansea.
    • Plans for joint BMC-BAMC Edinburgh 2010 .
    • Preliminary thoughts on plenary speakers and special sessions from Edinburgh (joint Edinburgh University - Heriot Watt) team.
    • Title for 2010 Edinburgh/Heriot-Watt meeting to be decided by .
    • Plans for joint BMC-BAMC Edinburgh 2010.
    • Edinburgh University to be the venue.

  4. Minutes for 2008
    • [There should be two Edinburgh representatives on the committee for BAMC/BMC 2010.
    • Jim Wright (J.R.Wright@ed.ac.uk) will be the Edinburgh University organiser] .
    • [I have suggested to Chris Howls (Chair BAMC) that he should coordinate with Peter regarding the joint BAMC/BMC meeting in Edinburgh in 20010.] .
    • Edmund Robertson welcomed Jim Wright as one of the Edinburgh representatives.
    • Moreover ER will replace Iain Gordon as one of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society representatives with effect from 1st June 2008.
    • Invitations will be sent to a suitable speaker from Queen's University, Belfast and to a suitable speaker from Edinburgh (here the committee suggested Tony Carbery or Sasha Volberg).
    • Joint BAMC/BMC meeting in 2010 in Edinburgh: .

  5. Scientific Committee 2006
    • Edinburgh (joint Edinburgh University - Heriot Watt) will host a 'Liverpool .
    • Edinburgh 2010 (BMC/BAMC, not yet put to an AGM) .
    • It was, however, agreed that it would be simpler for Edinburgh/Heriot-Watt to write to the LMS asking whether it would entertain an earlier application in the case of this joint meeting.
    • It was also agreed to coopt two representatives from Edinburgh/Heriot-Watt for the committee meeting in Swansea.
    • The Chair reported that this would be a joint pure and applied meeting organised by Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt Universities through the auspices of the Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences.

  6. Minutes for 1994
    • The treasurers of the Edinburgh and London Mathematical Societies were re-elected (proposed by D G S Stirling, seconded by J C Robson).
    • (d) three members nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society; .
    • In order to start the process, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society should each be invited to nominate .
    • A C McBride (two year term) Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • K A Brown (three year term) Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • E G Rees (four year term) Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  7. BMC Report
    • Maths2010: Joint meeting of British Mathematical Colloquium & British Applied Mathematics Colloquium Edinburgh, 6-9 April, 2010 .
    • A joint meeting of the British Mathematical Colloquium and the British Applied Mathematics Colloquium was held in Edinburgh during the week 6-9 April, 2010.
    • In addition, a very successful public lecture (also advertised as an event in the Edinburgh Science Festival) on mathematical finance was given by Paul Embrechts of ETH Zurich, and a satellite event for schoolchildren entitled Meet the Mathematicians was held at the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
    • Edinburgh is an attractive but relatively expensive conference venue.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  8. Minutes for 1997
    • Prof E G Rees (Edinburgh), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Prof R J Archbold (Aberdeen), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Prof P Rowlinson (Stirling), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Prof Rees commented that the British Applied Mathematics Colloquium recently held in Edinburgh had succeeded in attracting a large number of postgraduates.
    • Prof R E Borcherds (Cambridge), Dr J Nekovar (Cambridge), Prof I B Fesenko (Nottingham), Prof C J Bushnell (King's), Dr R Heath-Brown (Oxford), *Dr J McKee (Edinburgh), *Dr B ni Fhlathuin (Bath).

  9. Minutes for 2007
    • [Edinburgh representatives officially come on the committee from 1 June 2006] .
    • [The AGM should have accepted the invitation from Edinburgh.
    • The Chair confirmed that the 2010 BMC/BAMC joint meeting is to be hosted by the Maxwell Institute, Edinburgh.
    • Iain Gordon (Edinburgh) - until 31 May 2008 igordon@ed.ac.uk .
    • Edinburgh: .

  10. EMS Dec88.html
    • University of Edinburgh .
    • Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ.
    • We are writing on behalf of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society to give an interim response to your memo of 14 November.
    • President, Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Honorary Secretary, Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  11. Minutes for 2009
    • To be appointed, from the representatives of the 2010 venue (Edinburgh/Heriot Watt) .
    • Edinburgh (2010): .
    • Arrangements for the meeting in Edinburgh in 2010 (joint with BAMC).
    • Further applications to EMS, Glasgow Mathematics Journal Trust, Royal Society of Edinburgh and Institute of Physics are planned.

  12. Scientific Committee 2008
    • Overall income was £11,600 from registration fees, EPSRC and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Plans for Edinburgh 6-9th April 2010: .
    • Lectures would be in the George Square of Edinburgh University (lecture theatre capacity of 500).
    • A document regarding the 2010 BMC in Edinburgh was circulated: the Plenary Speakers who have accepted invitations are C.

  13. Minutes for 2010
    • Minutes of meeting of the Scientific Committee in Edinburgh on 7 April 2010 .
    • It was pointed out that Edinburgh had a 1,000 GBP deficit for the BAMC.
    • Academic and Financial Reports on the Maxwell Institute (Edinburgh/HeriotWatt) BMC 2010 .
    • Edmund Roberston asked what about putting a young person on the BMC Scientific Committee as proposed in Edinburgh.

  14. Minutes for 2009
    • Arrangements for the meeting in Edinburgh in 2010 (joint with BAMC).
    • It was suggested that other sources such as the City of Edinburgh and the Scottish Government could be asked for funding.
    • Must follow the AGM, but preferably during the Edinburgh meeting (rather than at the end).

  15. Minutes for 2012
    • Tom Leinster (Glasgow/Edinburgh) until 31 May 2014 .
    • Invitations to give morning lectures had been accepted by Konstantin Ardakov (QMUL), Tom Bridgeland (Oxford), Gavin Brown (Loughborough), Tim Dokchitser (Bristol), Tony Dooley (Bath), Tom Leinster (Edinburgh), Zinaida Lykova (Newcastle), Lasse Rempe-Gillen (Liverpool) and Stuart White (Glasgow).
    • YRM 2013 will be at the ICMS in Edinburgh, from 17-20 June.

  16. Minutes for 1999
    • The treasurers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and of the London Mathematical Society .
    • Three members nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society; .
    • (d) three members nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society; .

  17. Minutes for 1998
    • Prof R J Archbold (Aberdeen), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Prof J Howie (Heriot-Watt), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Prof P Rowlinson (Stirling), Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  18. SCminutes2013b.html
    • Edinburgh Maths Society reps: .
    • Tom Leinster (Edinburgh).
    • Tom Leinster has emailed the President of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, Mark Chaplain, but not yet received a response.

  19. Minutes for 1994
    • Our proposed membership of the Scientific Committee includes three persons nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and three persons nominated by the London Mathematical Society.
    • (d) three members nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Note: In order to start the process, the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society should each be invited to nominate .

  20. Minutes for 1991
    • Dr C J Smyth (Edinburgh - EMS nominee) .
    • The Honorary Treasurers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society were reappointed auditors of the BMC.

  21. Minutes for 1974
    • Prof W L Edge on behalf of the University of Edinburgh invited the 1977 Colloquium to Edinburgh in March 1977.

  22. Minutes for 2007
    • On behalf of the Maxwell Institute, Edinburgh University and Heriot-Watt University, Professor Anthony Carbery invited the BMC (and the BAMC) to the City of Edinburgh in 2010.

  23. Scientific Committee minutes 2004
    • The Chairman welcomed the members to the meeting, including Rob Archbold as a new nominee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (to 31 May 2007) and Norman Biggs (LMS).
    • EPSRC was unlikely to fund a 'pure mathematics' conference, but application could be made to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and possibly to specifically Welsh sources.

  24. Scientific Committee minutes 2004
    • The Chairman welcomed the members to the meeting, including Rob Archbold as a new nominee of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (to 31 May 2007) and Norman Biggs (LMS).
    • EPSRC was unlikely to fund a 'pure mathematics' conference, but application could be made to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and possibly to specifically Welsh sources.

  25. Woodall Mar89.html
    • President, Secretary, Treasurer and Past Treasurer, Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Drs J D P Meldrum and R J Steiner (for Edinburgh Mathematical Society) .

  26. Report2013.html
    • Morning lectures were given, in parallel pairs, by Stuart White (Glasgow), Gavin Brown (Loughborough), Zinaida Lykova (Newcastle), Tim Dokchitser (Bristol), June Barrow-Green (Open), Bruno Vallette (Nice, Isaac Newton Institute), Lasse Rempe-Gillen (Liverpool), Konstantin Ardakov (Queen Mary, London), Tom Leinster (Edinburgh), Anthony Dooley (Bath), Tom Bridgeland (Oxford) and Gesine Reinert (Oxford).
    • An joint grant of £1800.00 was awarded by the LMS and administered by YRM whose meeting took place in Edinburgh in June.

  27. Minutes for 1965
    • Announcements were made of the Joint meeting of the Edinburgh and London Mathematical Societies in Edinburgh on 10th April and of the Instructional Conference in Algebraic Number Theory at the University of Sussex in September 1965.

  28. Minutes for 2005
    • Nominees of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society .
    • Item 1: It was noted that a representative of the Edinburgh Math.

  29. Minutes for 1966
    • and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society distributed publicity leaflets for the London Colloquium; the American Mathematical Society and the Vereinigung published a note concerning the meeting.
    • was discussed and it was agreed that the Chairman should have authority to negotiate with the L.M.S., at the same time guarding the interests of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  30. Report2015.html
    • Arend Bayer (Edinburgh, Positivity in algebraic geometry via the derived category) .
    • (We were aware that the last Joint Meeting in Edinburgh ( made a loss.) ( .

  31. Minutes for 1978
    • The minutes of the Committee Meeting of 30.March 1977 in Edinburgh were read and approved.
    • A list of names (indicating an order of preference) was drawn up to conform with the distribution between areas of interest agreed at Edinburgh in 1977.

  32. Minutes for 2009
    • Report on progress of BMC/BAMC 2010, Edinburgh: Jim Howie circulated a poster.
    • An application for funding is being made to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  33. Minutes for 1992
    • Nominees of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society were noted.
    • The Honorary Treasurers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society were reappointed as Auditors of the BMC Accounts.

  34. Minutes for January 2004
    • Nominees of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society: .
    • Until 2001, the treasurer of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society audited the BMC accounts; however this came to an end in 2001 at the request of the EdMs, and the residual money was given to the LMS (see below).

  35. Scientific Committee 2002
    • The Chairman explained that there was some confusion about the number of nominees of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.
    • Chris Parker asked about funds from the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (EMS).

  36. Minutes for 1977
    • Minutes of the meeting of the Committee of the British Mathematical Colloquium, Pollock Halls, Edinburgh, 8 p.m.
    • It was agreed that records of the previous five years colloquia should be sent on to Lancaster, while earlier records would be lodged by Dr Meldrum with the Edinburgh Mathematical Society.

  37. Minutes for 1979
    • The following were elected to serve on the Committee: Dr A C McBride (nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society), Dr V W Bryant, Professor I M James, and Dr G R Allan.

  38. LMS report
    • A previous (more or less informal) arrangement with the Edinburgh Math.

  39. Minutes for 1958
    • The accounts of the Colloquium held in Nottingham were approved and the meeting was informed that following a decision made at the Committee meeting in Nottingham a further donation of £50 had been made to the Edinburgh International Congress thus bringing the total donation made by the British Mathematical Colloquium to £100.

  40. Minutes for 1965
    • and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society distributed the leaflets for the Dundee meeting; the American Mathematical Society and the Vereinigung published a note concerning the meeting.

  41. BMC advice
    • Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  42. Minutes for 1957
    • The meeting was informed that a donation of £50 had been made to the funds of the International Congress of Mathematicians to be held in Edinburgh in 1958.

  43. Minutes for 1993
    • The Treasurers of the Edinburgh and London Mathematical Societies were re-elected Honorary Auditors (proposed A Camina, seconded R Y Sharp).

  44. Minutes for 1974
    • It was reported that invitations from Aberystwyth for 1976 and Edinburgh for 1977 had been accepted.

  45. SCminutes2013a.html
    • EdMS representatives: Radha Kessar (City) until 31 May 2013, Tom Leinster (Edinburgh) until 31 May 2014.

  46. Minutes for 1995
    • The treasurers of the Edinburgh and London Mathematical Societies were re-elected (proposed by P M Neumann, seconded by A.

  47. BMC Report
    • Financial support was provided by the London Mathematical Society, EPSRC, and Edinburgh Mathematical Society, which together with the registration fee (£50, or £30 for students and retired mathematicians) enabled the colloquium to break even.

  48. Minutes for 1976
    • 1977 meeting in Edinburgh.

  49. Minutes for 1956
    • There was discussion about cancelling the 1958 Colloquium in view of the International Congress to be held in Edinburgh in August 1958.

  50. Minutes for 2012
    • The 2013 YRM is to held in Edinburgh, at ICMS, in late June.

  51. Minutes for 1985
    • The continued pressure from the London Mathematical Society and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society for reductions in the balance was considered, and various degrees of reduction were discussed.

  52. Minutes for 1967
    • The reports and announcements shall be communicated also to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and, at the discretion of the Chairman, to any other society that might wish to publish information about the Colloquium (for instance, the American Mathematical Society).

  53. Minutes for 1999
    • There are several satellite meetings planned, including: one-day meetings in Leeds on Monday April 17 on Model Theory, and on Ring Theory; a meeting in Leeds Tuesday April 11 to Friday April 14 on Harmonic Maps and Curvature Properties of Submanifolds; a meeting Wednesday April 12 to Saturday April 15 in Leeds on Mathematical Methods in Regular Dynamics; the British Topology Meeting in Sheffield on April 16 and 17; a Workshop on Operator Algebras in Edinburgh in the week before the BMC; and the annual HoDoMS meeting will be in Leeds April 17/18.

  54. Minutes for 1996
    • Prof G Rees (EMS) Edinburgh .

  55. Minutes for 1978
    • The minutes of the General Meeting at the University of Edinburgh were read and approved.

  56. Minutes for 2011
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society pledged up to £500 for the support of Scottish mathematicians but this was not used.

  57. Woodall Nov88.html
    • President, Secretary, Treasurer and Past Treasurer, Edinburgh Mathematical Society .

  58. Minutes for 1958
    • The Secretary reported that in accordance with the decision made by the Committee in Nottingham a further donation of £50 had been sent to the Edinburgh International Congress.

  59. Report2012.html
    • We held some discussions with representatives of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society about a possible application but in the end did not submit an application.

  60. Minutes for 1967
    • and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, and the notes published by the AMS and Vereinigung had apparently resulted in more than the usual number of overseas visitors coming to the Colloquium.

  61. BMC 1977
    • This was held at Edinburgh: 29 - 31 March 1977 nnnn .

  62. Minutes for 1997
    • The treasurers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and of the London Mathematical Society were re-elected (proposed by Professor E B Davies and seconded by Professor E C Lance).

  63. Minutes for 1964
    • Professor Goodstein reported that a grant of £50 (fifty pounds) from the Royal Society International Congress of Mathematicians (Edinburgh) Fund had been obtained, but was unlikely to be repeated.

  64. Constitution 2004
    • two members nominated by the Edinburgh Mathematical Society to serve (usually) for three years, from 1 June of one year to 31 May of another year; .

  65. Minutes for 2008
    • The dates of BMC 2010 in Edinburgh were confirmed as 6-9 April 2010.

  66. Minutes for 1977
    • A General Meeting of the British Mathematical Colloquium was held in the George Square Lecture Theatre at the University of Edinburgh at 2.00 p.m.

  67. Report 2007
    • Financially, we received support from the LMS, EPSRC and the Edinburgh Mathematical Society as well as BP.

  68. Minutes for 2011
    • Report on the 2010 BMC in Edinburgh, held jointly with the BAMC.

  69. Minutes for 1996
    • The treasurers of the Edinburgh and London Mathematical Societies were re-elected (proposed by H.

  70. Minutes for 2010
    • Edinburgh, 7 April 2010 .

  71. BMC 2010
    • This was held at Edinburgh (Joint with BAMC): 6 - 9 April 2010 nnnn The partner for this BMC was the BAMC .

  72. Report2014.html
    • At a late stage we were informed that Professor Atiyah is unable to deliver his lecture in person, but we managed to arrange a videoconferencing lecture live from Edinburgh.

  73. Minutes for 1953
    • Failing that Edinburgh was mentioned.

  74. Minutes for 1998
    • Election of Honorary Auditors: the treasurers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and of the London Mathematical Society were re-elected.

  75. Minutes for 1994
    • Rees (Edinburgh), H.E.

  76. BMC 2008
    • Robertson, E FThe Edinburgh Mathematical Society: the first 50 years (1883 - 1933) .


Gazetteer of the British Isles

  1. Edinburgh
    • Edinburgh .
    • Actuarial science can be said to begin in 1741, when Edinburgh clergymen, Alexander Webster and Robert Wallace, started collecting twenty year data for the projected Scottish Ministers' Widows' Fund.
    • The observatory in Edinburgh was made the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, in 1822, but didn't provide funds for new instruments for a decade.
    • The Royal (originally Philosophical) Society of Edinburgh was founded in 1739.
    • Colin Maclaurin was also an instigator, encouraging the Medical Society of Edinburgh to expand its scope to include other sciences and become the Philosophical Society.
    • The Edinburgh Mathematical Society was founded in 1883.
    • The University of Edinburgh is an ancient one, chartered in 1582 as the first civic university in Britain, but it has moved to modern buildings and I haven't seen any monuments or other historical material there.
    • A James Gregory (1753-1821), professor of medicine, and other members of his family are buried in Canongate Churchyard; this James was the great-grandson of the first James Gregorie, with his father John Gregory (1724-1773) (presumably the son of the second James) also having been professor of medicine and his son being Duncan Farquharson Gregory (1813-1844), the Cambridge mathematician, who was born and died in Edinburgh.
    • Students of Edinburgh University include the statistician Sir John Sinclair (1754-1835), the calculator George Parker Bidder (1806-1878), Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), David Hume (1711-1776), Sir John Leslie (1766-1832), Thomas Young (1773-1829) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879).
    • Alexander Bain, inventor of the electric clock, c1841, lived in Edinburgh and there is a plaque on his house/workshop [Everybody\'s Clocks.
    • Joseph Black (1728-1799) was in Edinburgh when he discovered carbonic acid (or carbon dioxide), then taught in Glasgow where he discovered latent heat, and then was professor in Edinburgh from 1766.
    • James Stirling died in Edinburgh (or perhaps at Leadhills??) and is buried in Greyfriars churchyard.
    • Colin MacLaurin (1698-1746) is buried in Greyfriars Kirk, a bit south of Edinburgh Castle.
    • Maxwell (in 1840-1847) and Tait were students at Edinburgh Academy, both being taught by a Mr Gloag, though being in different classes.
    • During his nine years in Edinburgh, Maxwell lived with an aunt, Mrs Wedderburn, in Heriot Row.
    • Charles Piazzi Smyth was Professor of Practical Astronomy and Director of the Edinburgh Observatory, and Astronomer Royal for Scotland from 1845.

  2. References
    • Edinburgh University Press for University of Glasgow, 1996.
    • Produced by the James Clerk Maxwell Foundation on the occasion of the Fourth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics coming to Edinburgh in July 1999.
    • Edinburgh.
    • Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland, Edinburgh, 1992.
    • The Edinburgh Graveyard Guide.
    • Saint Andrew Press, Edinburgh, 1991.

  3. Thurso, Caithness
    • ',1)">Pritchard]; [Edinburgh Curiosities 2, John Donald Publishers, Edinburgh, 1997, pp.17-21',2)">Thomson] .

  4. Marlow, Buckinghamshire
    • In the early 19th Century, Thomas Leybourn, William Wallace (from 1803 until moving to Edinburgh in 1819) and James Ivory (from 1804 until retiring in 1816) were here.
    • Wallace produced the article Fluxions for Brewster's Edinburgh Encyclopedia in 1815, which, despite its title, was the first complete account of the calculus in differential notation in English -186 pages of small print.

  5. Aberdeen
    • (There will be more Gregory under Edinburgh, Oxford individuals, Maidenhead and St Andrews!) .
    • However, later that year he accepted a post in Edinburgh, moving there in November 1725.

  6. St Andrews, Fife
    • In 1753, the University awarded a degree to James Short, the noted telescope maker who had moved from Edinburgh to London in 1738.
    • pp.162-163',10)">Guthrie] says the consultations took place in Edinburgh and Monimail, Fife.

  7. John Keill
    • Edinburgh .

  8. Astronomy
    • Edinburgh .

  9. Isaac Newton
    • Edinburgh .

  10. Oxford Institutions and Colleges
    • (More are in the Royal Scottish Museum in Edinburgh.) .

  11. Thomas Young
    • Edinburgh .

  12. John Napier
    • Edinburgh .

  13. Bertrand Russell
    • Edinburgh .

  14. Schiehallion, Perthshire
    • pp.163-164.',6)">Berry] See Edinburgh.

  15. Benvie, nr Dundee
    • John became professor of mathematics, and later natural philosophy, at Edinburgh, and was well-known as a geologist.

  16. James Gregory
    • Edinburgh .

  17. Oxford professorships
    • The Savilian Professorship is the third oldest mathematical chair in the UK, following the Gresham Professorship of 1575/1597 and the Edinburgh chair in 1583.

  18. Thomas Carlyle
    • Edinburgh .

  19. Parton, Galloway
    • (Produced by the James Clerk Maxwell Foundation on the occasion of the Fourth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics coming to Edinburgh in July 1999.)',2)">Maxwell Foundation].

  20. James Stirling
    • Edinburgh .

  21. Leadhills, Lanarkshire
    • at Leadhills, about 30 miles SSW of Edinburgh, from 1735 to 1770.

  22. George Chrystal
    • Edinburgh .

  23. London individuals S-Z
    • p.182',22)">Greenwood], but [The Glasgow Graveyard Guide, Saint Andrew Press, Edinburgh, 1992, p.48',23)">Black] says he is buried in the Necropolis, east of Glasgow Cathedral.

  24. John Playfair
    • Edinburgh .

  25. P G Tait
    • Edinburgh .

  26. John Leslie
    • Edinburgh .

  27. Henry Briggs
    • Edinburgh .

  28. Colin Maclaurin
    • Edinburgh .

  29. London Scientific Institutions
    • By that time, Edinburgh had established professors of mathematics and natural philosophy, in 1583.

  30. James Clerk Maxwell
    • Edinburgh .

  31. Charles Galton Darwin
    • Edinburgh .

  32. Lewis, Outer Hebrides
    • 67 chessmen and 14 plain draughtsmen are in the British Museum, while 11 chessmen are in the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

  33. George Darwin
    • Edinburgh .

  34. Annan, Dumfries
    • Annan has an Academy where Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) was a student (1805-1809), and then, after his studies at Edinburgh University, mathematics master 1814-1816.

  35. William Young
    • Edinburgh .

  36. Edmund Whittaker
    • Edinburgh .

  37. Glasgow
    • In 1851, he presented a paper to the Royal Society of Edinburgh which first stated the second law of thermodynamics.


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