Search Results for Strasbourg


Biographies

  1. Feldbau biography
    • Born: 22 October 1914 in Strasbourg, Alsace, Germany (now France) .
    • In the late 19th century the family left Poland, going first to Munich before settling in Strasbourg which at that time was part of Germany.
    • Armand Feldbau was a wholesale distributor of butter, eggs and cheese having a business in the Rue Hannong, Strasbourg.
    • La Tribune juive (Strasbourg) refers to him as a "highly respected member of the Orthodox community Ets-Haim".
    • The road had been named "Neue Strasse" from 1912 to 1918 and renamed "Rue du 22 Novembre" after Strasbourg returned to France following World War I.
    • This is not surprising since at this time the majority of the families in Strasbourg were German speaking.
    • This Strasbourg address would remain Feldbau's home address for the rest of his life.
    • On 1 October 1926, having returned to Strasbourg, he re-entered the Gymnasium Fustel de Coulanges for his secondary education.
    • As a consequence, he enrolled at the University of Strasbourg in the autumn of 1934.
    • La Tribune Juive notes on 12 August 1938 that it has pleasure in announcing that Jacques Feldbau of Strasbourg has successfully passed the Agregation in mathematics.
    • After the award of his agregation he returned to Strasbourg to begin work on his doctoral dissertation.
    • He asked Weil about possible topics for his dissertation and Weil suggested that Feldbau speak to Charles Ehresmann who had just been appointed as a lecturer at Strasbourg.
    • As Feldbau began his postgraduate studies, life in Strasbourg was not easy for Jews.
    • These are more useful to me since almost all my books have remained in Strasbourg and must be considered as lost.
    • Although he was in Chateauroux, Feldbau must have kept in contact with his Strasbourg colleagues since he clearly knew exactly what was happening.
    • Clermont-Ferrand is where the University of Strasbourg moved in September 1939 before the German armies invaded France so by the time Feldbau is writing this the University of Strasbourg had been located there for over a year.
    • There were only three graduate students for the whole illustrious faculty of Clermont-Strasbourg: Jacques Feldbau, a student of Ehresmann, Gorny, a Polish refugee in France and a student of Mandelbrojt, both brilliant, and myself.

  2. Kramp biography
    • Born: 8 July 1760 in Strasbourg, France .
    • Died: 13 May 1826 in Strasbourg, France .
    • His father, Jean-Michel Kramp, was a teacher in the Gymnasium at Strasbourg.
    • The city of Strasbourg has, over a long period, been on the border of the French and German speaking regions and, as a consequence, has been fought over on several occasions.
    • His interests were broad while he studied at the Gymnasium in Strasbourg and he entered the University in that city, again taking a broad range of courses, but specialising in medicine.
    • After graduating, he practised medicine in the Strasbourg region around where he lived, travelling to patients in a fairly wide area.
    • In 1783, the year the Montgolfier brothers made the first balloon ascension, Kramp published in Strasbourg an account of aerostatics in which he treated the subject historically, physically, and mathematically.
    • He did not give up his academic interests over this period, however, and he had submitted his thesis De vi vitalistic arteriarum addita nova de febrium indole generalized conjectura Ⓣ to the University of Strasbourg in 1786.
    • It was around the turn of the century that he changed languages and published in French his most important astronomical work Analyse des refractions astronomiques et terrestres Ⓣ (Strasbourg-Leipzig, 1799).
    • Kramp was appointed professor of mathematics at Strasbourg, the town of his birth, in 1809.

  3. Reeb biography
    • Died: 6 November 1993 in Strasbourg, France .
    • Georges, who had a sister Gertrude, was born in Saverne which is about 40 km north west of Strasbourg in Alsace.
    • Reeb began his university studies at the University of Strasbourg before the start of World War II.
    • In September 1939, as part of these preparations, the inhabitants of Strasbourg had been evacuated and the University of Strasbourg was displaced to Clermont-Ferrand.
    • However, the Germans regarded the university in Clermont-Ferrand as their particular enemy, because of the history of French and German periods of the University of Strasbourg from the time of the Franco-German war in 1870.
    • Ehresmann had only been appointed to Strasbourg shortly before the university moved to Clermont-Ferrand and Reeb was his second doctoral student.
    • The first of Ehresmann's doctoral students, Jacques Feldbau, had been born in Strasbourg but was Jewish.
    • In the following year Charles Ehresmann and Andre Lichnerowicz organised the conference "Differential geometry" at the University of Strasbourg.
    • In 1963 he left Grenoble when he was appointed to the University of Strasbourg.
    • Michele Audin gives the following summary of Reeb's most important contributions [',' M Audin, Differential geometry, Strasbourg 1953, Notices Amer.
    • Audin also gives an indication of Reeb's character [',' M Audin, Differential geometry, Strasbourg 1953, Notices Amer.
    • When I arrived in Strasbourg in 1987, he used to come to the department and go from one office to another talking with people, which had always been his way of working.
    • In his lectures, Reeb put into context the results which his very active trajectories research group in Strasbourg had obtained.
    • I wanted to come to Strasbourg to accompany Reeb to his final resting place and find, among his students and all those who loved him, the precious memory of his warm presence.

  4. Weber Heinrich biography
    • Died: 17 May 1913 in Strasbourg, Germany (now France) .
    • Weber's final post was to Strasbourg where he was appointed in 1895.
    • It is reasonable to consider why Weber left Gottingen, perhaps the leading mathematical centre in the world at this time, to move to Strasbourg.
    • Germany had captured Strasbourg after a 50-day siege during the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71 and annexed the city.
    • After taking control of Alsace-Lorraine, the Germans had reorganised the University of Strasbourg and reopened it as the German Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strasbourg in 1872.
    • Both Christoffel and Reye considered it their patriotic duty to assist in making the University of Strasbourg a German university.
    • However, Weber did not move to Strasbourg for mathematical reasons, but rather for personal ones.
    • Strasbourg was quite close to Weber's native city of Heidelberg, and one of Weber's daughters, Lina Weber-Holtzmann, had married Heinrich Holtzmann, the professor of theology at Strasbourg, and was living there.
    • Another reason was that his salary was higher in Strasbourg than Gottingen, at least in part because taxes in Alsace were significantly less than those in Prussia.
    • Once he had arrived in Strasbourg he had as colleagues Theodor Reye and the extraordinary professor Adolph Krazer (1858-1926), a student of Friedrich Emil Prym (1841-1919).
    • Again Weber served as rector of the university in which he was working, taking on this role at Strasbourg during session 1900-01.
    • Weber remained in Strasbourg for the rest of his life and during this time it remained a German city; only at the end of the World War I in 1918 did the city revert to France.

  5. Valiron biography
    • He was sent to the University of Strasbourg to teach mathematics, presenting a course on 'Dirichlet series and factorial series' in March and April 1921.
    • He taught for over ten years in Strasbourg and, at this point, we should explain the political significance of this move.
    • Germany had captured Strasbourg after a 50-day siege during the 1870-71 war and annexed the city.
    • After taking control of Alsace-Lorraine, the Germans had reorganised the University of Strasbourg and reopened it as the German Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strasbourg in 1872.
    • Both Christoffel and Reye considered it their patriotic duty to assist in making the University of Strasbourg a German university.
    • After the German defeat in World War I, Strasbourg reverted to French control in 1919 and the French re-established the University of Strasbourg, reorganising it as the autonomous French university Universite Louis Pasteur-Strasbourg.
    • Valiron was one of a number of eminent Frenchmen sent to Strasbourg to achieve this aim.
    • Maurice Frechet was his colleague in Strasbourg from 1921 to 1927.
    • In 1931 he left Strasbourg when called to the Faculty of Science in Paris.
    • Most biographies of Valiron state that his most famous doctoral student was Laurent Schwartz who was awarded his doctorate by the University of Strasbourg in 1943.
    • This is slightly puzzling since Valiron spent the war years in Paris and had not taught at Strasbourg in the preceding ten years.
    • He happened to meet Henri Cartan when he visited Toulouse to conduct an oral on behalf of the Ecole Normale Superieure and Henri Cartan advised him to study for a doctorate at Clermont-Ferrand which is where the University of Strasbourg moved when the German armies invaded France at the start of World War II.

  6. Reye biography
    • However, he only worked in Aachen for two years before he was appointed to the Chair of Geometry and Mechanics at the Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strasbourg.
    • This move to Strasbourg was, in many ways, made for patriotic reasons.
    • Germany had captured Strasbourg after a 50-day siege during the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71 and annexed the city.
    • After taking control of Alsace-Lorraine, the Germans had reorganised the University of Strasbourg and reopened it as the German Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strasbourg in 1872.
    • Both Christoffel and Reye considered it their patriotic duty to assist in making the University of Strasbourg a German university.
    • At Strasbourg, Reye and Christoffel [',' P L Butzer, An outline of the life and work of E B Christoffel (1829-1900), in P L Butzer and F Feher (eds.), E B CHristoffel: The influences of his work on mathematics and the physical sciences (Birkhauser Verlag, Basel-Boston-Stuttgart, 1981), 2-29.','2]:- .
    • About two dozen candidates received their doctoral degrees in mathematics and astronomy at Strasbourg between 1872 and 1895.
    • Reye's contributions to the Mathematical Seminar at the University of Strasbourg are described in detail in [',' F R Wollmershauser, Das Mathematische Seminar der Universitat Strassburg (1872-1900), in P L Butzer (ed.), E B Christoffel, The influence of his work on mathematics and the physical sciences (Birkhauser Verlag, Basel-Boston-Stuttgart, 1981), 52-70.','7].
    • After he retired in 1909 Reye remained in Strasbourg until the end of World War I.
    • His daughter Katharina had married Ludwig Jost who was appointed Professor of Botany at the University of Strasbourg in the year that Reye retired.
    • After the defeat of Germany in 1918, Strasbourg was returned to France and many Germans were expelled.
    • Katharina and her husband were also forced to leave Strasbourg and Ludwig Jost was appointed as Professor of Botany at the University of Heidelberg in 1919.

  7. Epstein biography
    • He then went to study at the University of Strasbourg which at that time was known as Strassburg and was part of Germany.
    • We should give a little background on the position of Strasbourg as a sometimes French, sometimes German university.
    • Germany had captured Strasbourg after a 50-day siege during the 1870-71 war and annexed the city.
    • After taking control of Alsace-Lorraine, the Germans had reorganised the University of Strasbourg and reopened it as the German Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strassburg in 1872.
    • Both Christoffel and Reye considered it their patriotic duty to assist in making the University of Strasbourg a German university.
    • Epstein was taught at Strasbourg by Christoffel who became his thesis advisor.
    • After submitting his thesis Zur Lehre von den hyperelliptischen Integralen Ⓣ on abelian functions, Epstein received his doctorate in 1895 from the University of Strasbourg.
    • From 1895 to 1918 he remained in Strasbourg, teaching at the Technical School and also at the University where he had been appointed a Privatdozent.
    • At the end of the war in 1918, however, the city of Strasbourg reverted to France, and Epstein, being German, was forced to leave Alsace.
    • Although he had done good work in Strasbourg, he had remained a Privatdocent.
    • Examples of his research undertaken at Strasbourg are Zur Theorie allgemeiner Zetafunctionen Ⓣ (Part I, 1903; Part II, 1906) and Uber Mobiuskettenbruche und Elementarkettenbruche Ⓣ (1918).
    • Forced to leave Strasbourg and having no position to go to, Epstein returned to his native city of Frankfurt.

  8. Koszul biography
    • Born: 3 January 1921 in Strasbourg, Bas-Rhin, France .
    • Andre was a university professor in Strasbourg and his parents (Jean-Louis grandparents) were Julien Stanislas Koszul and Helene Ludivine Rosalie Marie Salome.
    • He was educated at the Lycee Fustel-de-Coulanges in Strasbourg before studying at the Faculty of Science in Strasbourg and the Faculty of Science in Paris.
    • Koszul was appointed as Maitre de Conferences at the University of Strasbourg in 1949.
    • He was promoted to professor there in 1956, and remained in Strasbourg until he appointed professor in the Faculty of Science at Grenoble in 1963.

  9. Ehresmann biography
    • Born: 19 April 1905 in Strasbourg, Alsace (now France) .
    • He attended the Lycee Kleber in Strasbourg but, after 1919 Alsace was returned to France and French language schools were set up.
    • He became a lecturer in the University of Strasbourg in 1939 but shortly after this he was back in the middle of the France/Germany conflict of his youth but this time on a quite different scale as the Germans invaded Alsace in 1940.
    • During the German occupation of World War II, the University of Strasbourg's faculties were moved to Clermont Ferrand University in central France, then back to Strasbourg in 1945.

  10. Finck biography
    • Died: 27 July 1870 in Strasbourg, France .
    • Returning to university, Finck entered the University of Strasbourg in 1821 studying mathematics in the Faculty of Science.
    • Before completing his doctoral work, Finck began teaching mathematics at the Artillery School of Strasbourg in 1825, which does have a certain irony after his own experiences as a student at Artillery School.
    • He also taught at the College de Strasbourg from 1827, becoming a professor there in 1829.
    • In 1842 Finck was appointed to the chair of mathematics at the University of Strasbourg.

  11. Arbogast biography
    • Died: 18 April 1803 in Strasbourg, France .
    • In 1789 Arbogast moved from Colmar to Strasbourg where he taught mathematics at the Ecole d'Artillerie.
    • Arbogast's career in Strasbourg reached new heights.
    • In addition to his mathematics post, he was appointed as professor of physics at the College Royal in Strasbourg and from April 1791 he served as its rector until October 1791 when he was appointed rector of the University of Strasbourg.

  12. Bethe biography
    • Born: 2 July 1906 in Strasbourg, Germany (now France) .
    • Today, Strasbourg, as part of Alsace, is in France, though it borders the German region of Baden.
    • Hans' parents were Albrecht, a physician, and Ella whose father was a professor of medicine at the university in Strasbourg.

  13. Lichnerowicz biography
    • In September 1939, as part of these preparations, the inhabitants of Strasbourg had been evacuated and the University of Strasbourg was displaced to Clermont-Ferrand.
    • However, the Germans regarded the university in Clermont-Ferrand as their particular enemy, because of the history of French and German periods of the University of Strasbourg from the time of the Franco-Prussian war in 1870.
    • Lichnerowicz was appointed as an assistant lecturer in mechanics at the University of Strasbourg, by then located in Clermont-Ferrand, in 1941.
    • In November 1943 the Germans carried out a raid on the University of Strasbourg, in Clermont-Ferrand, and they arrested Lichnerowicz.
    • After the war ended in 1945, the University of Strasbourg returned to the city of Strasbourg where Lichnerowicz continued to perform his duties.
    • Then, in 1945, during a very cold winter, with little means of heating (I was a professor at Strasbourg at this time) suddenly one Sunday, I said: "Well, it will work like that." And I verified it.
    • Lichnerowicz followed Bruhat's suggestion for the first of these books, and set about writing the textbook, Algebre et Analyse Lineaires Ⓣ based on lectures he gave at Strasbourg.

  14. Christoffel biography
    • Died: 15 March 1900 in Strasbourg, France .
    • After three years at the Gewerbsakademie in Berlin, Christoffel was offered the chair of mathematics at the University of Strasbourg.
    • Heinrich Weber was appointed to succeed him at Strasbourg in 1895.
    • Christoffel supervised six doctoral students while at Strasbourg.

  15. Appell biography
    • Born: 27 September 1855 in Strasbourg, France .
    • The Germans captured Strasbourg after a 50-day siege in which Appell suffered greatly.
    • Strasbourg was annexed by the Germans and Appell moved to Nancy to become a French citizen and prepare himself to study at university in Paris.

  16. Samelson biography
    • Born: 3 March 1916 in Strassburg, Germany, now Strasbourg, France .
    • Hans's younger brother was born in Strasbourg (as it had been renamed) in December 1918 shortly after the French occupation and before international recognition of the city's transfer to France in the Treaty of Versailles in June 1919.
    • The Samelson family were expelled from Strasbourg by the new French authorities and, after a brief stay in the Black Forest, they returned to Siegfried's hometown of Breslau, where Siegfried became a professor of paediatrics and director of school health system.

  17. Meyer Paul-Andre biography
    • Died: 30 January 2003 in Strasbourg, France .
    • He was appointed to the University of Strasbourg in 1964.
    • Following his death the Institut de Recherche Mathematique Avancee at Strasbourg created the Meyer Prize which is awarded annually to an outstanding young probabilist working in the field of stochastic processes.

  18. Weil biography
    • His mother, Salomea Reinherz (1879-1965) known as Selma, came from a family of Russian Jews who had emigrated to Austria, while his father, Bernard Bernhard Weil (1872-1955), was a medical doctor whose family had lived in Strasbourg, Alsace.
    • When Andre was born in the following year, in addition to his parents, his paternal grandmother and several uncles were living in Paris but his paternal grandfather Abraham Weill had died in Strasbourg.
    • Andre's maternal grandmother Hermine Reinherz, who was an excellent pianist, lived in his family home with the Weil family which, until 1912, was on the Boulevard de Strasbourg.
    • The family moved from the Boulevard de Strasbourg to the Boulevard Saint-Michel before Andre began his second year at the lycee.
    • Returning to France after the two years in India, he worked at the University of Strasbourg from 1933 until the outbreak of World War II.
    • Henri Cartan was on the staff at Strasbourg at this time and the two often discussed teaching.
    • Andre Weil and I were both at the University of Strasbourg in 1934.

  19. Antoine biography
    • From 1919, Antoine had a position at the University of Strasbourg while he worked on his thesis.
    • He submitted his doctoral thesis, Sur l'homeomorphie de deux figures et de leurs voisinages Ⓣ, to the University of Strasbourg and was awarded his doctorate on 9 July 1921.
    • Antoine was not particularly happy in Strasbourg.
    • After taking control of Alsace-Lorraine, the Germans had reorganised the University of Strasbourg and reopened it as the German Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strasbourg in 1872.
    • Strasbourg was returned to France after World War I and the city and university were being made French when Antoine was appointed.
    • After the birth of Maurice at Strasbourg, his two daughters, Madeleine and Denise, were born in Rennes: Antoine always regretted that he had never seen his children.

  20. Esclangon biography
    • He became professor of astronomy at the Faculty of Sciences at Strasbourg in 1919, having been appointed director of the Observatory there in the previous year.
    • In [',' H Gispert and J Leloup, Des patrons des mathematiques en France dans l’entre-deux-guerres, Revue d’histoire des sciences 62 (1) (2009), 39-117.','11] Helene Gispert and Juliette Leloup quote from a notice that Esclangon wrote in 1929 about his move to Strasbourg:- .
    • After the armistice, I was sent to Strasbourg as director of the Observatory and professor of astronomy.
    • Although Esclangon had staff recruitment difficulties, he did have the help of Andre Danjon (1890-1967) in his reorganisation of the Strasbourg Observatory.
    • Danjon had, like Esclangon, served in the military during World War I and was appointed as an astronomer at the Strasbourg Observatory in 1919.
    • He would be appointed as its director after Esclangon left Strasbourg in 1929.
    • Of course, one of the major topics arousing attention in astronomy during his years in Strasbourg was attempts to verify Einstein's general theory of relativity by making observations of the deviation of light passing close to the sun.

  21. Frechet biography
    • However before he was released from military service at the end of the war, he was selected to go to Strasbourg to assist with re-establishing the university there.
    • He was both professor of higher analysis at the University of Strasbourg and Director of the Mathematics Institute there from 1919 to 1927.
    • He now had major administrative duties, one of the first being setting up and organising the International Congress of Mathematicians in Strasbourg in 1920.
    • It was after going to Strasbourg that he began to become interested in statistics but he only published a small number of articles on probability at this stage, most of his papers being on general analysis and topology.
    • However, he taught courses on probability, statistics, and insurance mathematics at Strasbourg.
    • There is also a suggestion that Frechet had a difference of opinion with the Council of the Faculty of Science at Strasbourg which meant he was both pleased to return to Paris and not unhappy at leaving Strasbourg.

  22. Fincke biography
    • However, probably influenced by his uncle who had studied at Strasbourg and Wittenberg, he decided to go very much further south and, in 1577, he matriculated at Strasbourg Academy.
    • He spent five years studying mathematics and astrology, philosophy and rhetoric at Strasbourg.
    • His mathematics professor at Strasbourg Academy was Conrad Dasypodius (1532-1600), famed for his work on Strasbourg Cathedral's Astronomical Clock between 1571 and 1574.
    • Finke would almost certainly have studied these works while studying under Dasypodius at the Strasbourg Academy.
    • It was there that he published Geometriae rotundi libri XIIII (1583), a work he had undertaken at Strasbourg, which has guaranteed his fame as a mathematician.

  23. Cartan Henri biography
    • The year in which this joint paper appeared was the one when Cartan left his position in Lille and, starting in November 1931, he took up a post at the University of Strasbourg.
    • Cartan was teaching at the University of Strasbourg when World War II started [',' A Jackson, Interview with Henri Cartan [b.
    • But in September 1939, the inhabitants of Strasbourg had to be evacuated.
    • Throughout the war I was not permitted to go to my apartment in Strasbourg.
    • He actually went to Strasbourg, but to no avail.
    • Late in 1945, when World War II had ended, Cartan returned to the University of Strasbourg and taught there for a further two years.

  24. Burgi biography
    • We are able to say with more certainty that he was in Strasbourg for some time during 1570-74 when Josia and Isaac Habrecht were building an astronomical clock for Strasbourg cathedral.
    • The Swiss mathematician Konrad Dasypodius, who was the professor of mathematics at the University of Strasbourg, had designed the astronomical clock and is likely that Burgi acquired his expertise in mathematics from Dasypodius or his pupils.
    • Although Burgi never learnt Latin (the language of science at this time), he was very knowledgeable in mathematics and astronomy with skills compatible with having been immersed in the scientific circle in Strasbourg, but certainly not as part of a university course.
    • The Landgraf of Hesse-Kassel at this time was Wilhelm IV, an excellent mathematician and astronomer, who had maintained connections with Strasbourg where he had undergone his scientific training.

  25. Netto biography
    • There was no immediate university appointment for Netto, however, and he taught at the Friedrich-Werder Gymnasium in Berlin for nine years before being appointed as extraordinary professor at the University of Strasbourg in 1879.
    • It was the French-German war of 1870-71, which ended with Alsace being annexed by the German empire, that had led to a German university being set up in Strasbourg.
    • In 1872 the so-called Kaiser-Wilhelms-Universitat was opened in Strasbourg.
    • In 1880, while he was Strasbourg, Netto married Hedwig Elfriede Freund (1860-1921); they had one son and two daughters.
    • After three years at the University of Strasbourg Weierstrass recommended that Netto be appointed an extraordinary professor at the University of Berlin and he took up the appointment in 1882.

  26. Karpinski biography
    • to get a university post so, on 1 September 1901, he enrolled in the Kaiser Wilhelm University of Strasbourg.
    • This university was German at this time and had been since Strasbourg had been annexed by Germany in the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71.
    • He received some financial support from his parents and he made some money by taking a teaching position in the American College in Strasbourg which taught the children of rich Americans living there.
    • His thesis advisor at Strasbourg was Heinrich Weber and Karpinski was awarded his doctorate in 1903 for his number-theory thesis Uber die Verteilungen der quadratischen Reste.
    • They became close friends and Grace continued to study at Cornell while Karpinski was undertaking doctoral studies in Strasbourg.

  27. Rallis biography
    • He then had a number of visiting positions at Strasbourg, Texas, Notre Dame and Princeton.
    • He spent two years in Strasbourg and was visited there by Gerard Schiffmann who writes [',' J Cogdell and D Jiang (eds.), Remembering Steve Rallis, Notices Amer.
    • Later during their stay in Strasbourg my wife and I had many occasions to visit with them.
    • While in Strasbourg in 1975, he published, with Gerard Schiffmann, Distributions invariantes par le groupe orthogonal Ⓣ in the Nancy-Strasbourg Seminar 'Analyse harmonique sur les groupes de Lie':- .

  28. Loday biography
    • Loday was awarded his agregation de mathematiques in 1969 and he went to the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg where he undertook research for his doctorate.
    • It was at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg that Loday spent his whole career.
    • He worked there at the Institut de Recherche Mathematique Avancee which is a laboratory of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and of the Universite Louis Pasteur of Strasbourg.
    • He explains the idea behind operads in [',' Jean-Louis Loday (1946-2012), Institut de Recherche Mathematique Avancee, University of Strasbourg.','6]:- .
    • He has supervised 15 theses and brought many postdoctoral students to Strasbourg.

  29. Study biography
    • After studying at the University of Jena for a year, Study decided that he wanted to move towards mathematics and in order to do this he went to the University of Strasbourg to work with Theodor Reye.
    • Study solved all the problems in the first volume of this book during the academic year 1881-82 when he was at Strasbourg.
    • He spent the winter semester of 1882-83 at the University of Leipzig before returning to Strasbourg.
    • He did not spend long on this second period at Strasbourg for he soon moved to the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich.

  30. Libermann biography
    • After the award of her certificate, Libermann was appointed to teach, first at Douai in the north east of France about 30 km south of Lille, then, from the beginning of the 1945, at the High School for Girls in Strasbourg.
    • Then in 1953 she defended her thesis Sur le probleme d'equivalence de certaines structures infinitesimales Ⓣ and received her Docteur d'Etat from the Louis Pasteur University of Strasbourg.
    • In this early part of her career she spoke at a number of international conferences such as: Colloque de topologie et geometrie differentielle Ⓣ held in Strasbourg in 1952; Geometrie differentielle Ⓣ held at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Strasbourg in 1953; and Convegno Internazionale di Geometria Differenziale Ⓣ held in Italy in 1953.

  31. Koenigs biography
    • It was decided that an International Congress of Mathematicians should take place in September 1920 and Koenigs, as the French delegate, invited the Congress to Strasbourg.
    • The duly accredited delegates of the (Allied) nations were to meet in Strasbourg at the time of the Congress to confirm the statutes and to create the International Mathematical Union.
    • Mittag-Leffler never recognised the Strasbourg Congress as an international event.
    • Koenigs was elected as Secretary General of the Executive Committee of the International Mathematical Union at the Strasbourg Congress [',' O Lehto, Mathematics Without Borders (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1998).','3]:- .

  32. Mathieu Emile biography
    • Germany had captured Strasbourg after a 50-day siege during the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71 and annexed the city.
    • After taking control of Alsace-Lorraine, the Germans had reorganised the University of Strasbourg and reopened it as the German Kaiser-Wilhelm University of Strasbourg in 1872.
    • Xavier Dagobert Bach (1813-1885), the professor at Strasbourg before the war, lost his position and was appointed as professor of pure mathematics at Nancy.

  33. Brocard biography
    • He attended the Lycee in Marseilles, moving from there to the Lycee in Strasbourg.
    • After graduating from the Lycee he entered the Academy in Strasbourg where he was coached to take the entrance examinations of the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris.
    • He attended the International Congress of Mathematicians at Zurich in 1897, Paris in 1900, Heidelberg in 1904, Rome in 1908, Cambridge, England in 1912, and Strasbourg in 1920.

  34. Thom biography
    • In 1946 Thom graduated from the Ecole Normale Superieure and then moved to Strasbourg, taking a CNRS research post, so that he could continue to work with Henri Cartan.
    • The work of the thesis was carried out in Strasbourg but Thom presented it to Paris.
    • Thom returned to France and taught at Grenoble in 1953-54, then at Strasbourg from 1954 until 1963.

  35. Speiser Andreas biography
    • After leaving Britain, Speiser spent time in Paris before going to Strasbourg where he habilitated in 1911.
    • He taught at Strasbourg for several years and during this time his work on the composition of quadratic forms led him to study group theory.
    • After positions in Karlsruhe, Strasbourg and Dresden, he was appointed as an Ordinary Professor of Geometry at Zurich in 1920.

  36. Huntington biography
    • This was awarded by the University of Strasbourg in 1901.
    • Most American mathematicians of this period who went to Europe to complete their studies chose Germany and, indeed, the city of Strasbourg was German at this time (and in fact called Strassburg).

  37. Bortkiewicz biography
    • He studied at Strasbourg from 1891 to 1892, then at Gottingen under Lexis in 1892, going on to also study at Vienna and Leipzig.
    • After lecturing in statistics and actuarial science from 1895 to 1897 as a privatdozent in Strasbourg he went to St Petersburg where he was a clerk in the Railway Office from 1897 until 1901.

  38. Schwartz biography
    • Cartan advised him to study for a doctorate at Clermont-Ferrand which is where the University of Strasbourg moved after the German armies invaded France at the start of World War II.
    • Schwartz's thesis Etude des sommes d'exponentielles Ⓣ, submitted to the University of Strasbourg in 1943, contains the following acknowledgement as to the help that Valiron had given:- .

  39. Norlund biography
    • He was one of only five plenary speakers invited to address the 1920 International Congress of Mathematicians at Strasbourg.
    • He was elected to the Det kongelige danske Videnskabernes Selskab (1916), the Societe des Sciences, Strasbourg (1920), the Accademia Pontaniana, Napoli (1925), the Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien, Stockholm (1925), the Societas scientiarum Fennica, Helsinki (1926), the Academie des Sciences, Paris (1926), the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Roma (1927), the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher, Halle (1927), the Royal Astronomical Society, London (1935), the Bureau des Longitudes, Paris (1937), the Royal Society, London (1938), the Akademiet for de tekniske Videnskaber, Kobenhavn (1939), the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Oslo (1946), the Vetenskapsakademien, Helsinki (1946), the Det kungliga vetenskapliga Sallskapet, Uppsala (1951), the Societas scientiarum Islandica, Reykjavik (1959), and the New York Academy of Sciences (1960).

  40. Savart biography
    • It was to Strasbourg that Savart went in 1814 and, two years later, he graduated from the university with a medical degree.
    • After completing his degree Savart remained in Strasbourg where he both gained further medical experience and also worked on a translation of Celsus's De medicina Ⓣ.

  41. Wu Wen-Tsun biography
    • He went to the University of Strasbourg where he undertook research with Charles Ehresmann as his advisor.
    • Thom, a student of Cartan's, had held a CNRS research post at Strasbourg while Wu was studying there and they had got to know each other at this time and exchanged mathematical ideas, beginning a good collaboration.

  42. Delsarte biography
    • Delsarte cooperated with Andre Weil and Henri Cartan, both by this time lecturers in Strasbourg, in organising a joint seminar programme between Nancy and Strasbourg.

  43. Bolibrukh biography
    • He was invited to spend 1995-97 as a visiting professor at the University of Nice, and a similar invitation saw him spend 1998-2002 a visiting professor at the University of Strasbourg.
    • A year after he died, a conference in his honour was organized in Strasbourg, France.

  44. Peres biography
    • He became an assistant lecturer at Strasbourg (1920-21) before being appointed Professor of Rational and Applied Mechanics at Marseilles in 1921.
    • It was during his time in Strasbourg that the direction of his research began to change and he began to be interested in applied mathematics problems in addition to the topics that he had studied for his doctorate but he never completely abandoned his original topic.

  45. Francais Jacques biography
    • Jacques entered the College at Strasbourg and excelled in his studies there.
    • In 1807 he was stationed at Strasbourg and his commander there was Malus.

  46. Archibald biography
    • Following this Archibald studied in Europe, attending the University of Berlin in session 1898-99 and then the University of Strasbourg in 1899-1900.
    • from Strasbourg in 1900 for a thesis The Cardioid and Some of Its Related Curves.

  47. Godement biography
    • In fact he was fortunate to have Henri Cartan as a lecturer since he was on the faculty at Strasbourg but after a visit to Paris he could not return to Strasbourg since the Germans controlled the city and the university.

  48. Matsushima biography
    • He left for France in the autumn of 1954, spending time at the University of Strasbourg, and then in Paris as a member of C.N.R.S.
    • Matsushima presented some of his results to Ehresmann's seminar in Strasbourg, extending Cartan's classification of complex irreducible Lie algebras to the case of real Lie algebras.

  49. Cassini de Thury biography
    • Cassini gained extremely valuable experience in assisting his father Jacques Cassini on his project to measure the perpendicular to the meridian from Saint-Malo to Strasbourg.
    • In the following year they surveyed the perpendicular to the meridian east of Paris, triangulating the area between Paris and Strasbourg.

  50. Mises biography
    • He was professor of applied mathematics at Strasbourg (then called Strassburg) from 1909 until 1918, although this was a period which was interrupted by World War I.

  51. Andreotti biography
    • He spent the rest of his career at Pisa, although he spent much time abroad visiting the University of Nancy, the University of Paris, Gottingen University, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, Strasbourg University, Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, Stanford University in Palo Alto, California and Oregon State University at Corvallis, Oregon.

  52. Bernoulli Daniel biography
    • This Daniel did spending time studying medicine at Heidelberg in 1718 and Strasbourg in 1719.

  53. Dumas biography
    • Representing the University of Lausanne, he attended the 1920 ICM in Strasbourg, the 1928 ICM in Bologna, and the 1932 ICM in Zurich.

  54. Rudolff biography
    • The book was published in Strasbourg.

  55. Bolza biography
    • From 1878 until 1881 Bolza studied mathematics under Christoffel and Reye at Strasbourg, under Schwarz at Gottingen and under Weierstrass at Berlin.

  56. Young biography
    • He received honorary degrees from the universities of Calcutta, Geneva, and Strasbourg.

  57. Brisson biography
    • The admirable Languedoc Canal will then be only a branch of that vast system of internal navigation on which one will be able to travel from Marseille to Dunkerque or Strasbourg at will.

  58. Hilbert biography
    • Klein was probably not too unhappy when Weber moved to a chair at Strasbourg three years later since on this occasion he was successful in his aim of appointing Hilbert.

  59. De Rham biography
    • He received honorary degrees from the universities of Strasbourg, Genoble, Lyon, and l'Ecole Polytechnique Federale Zurich.

  60. Volterra biography
    • In 1920 he was invited to give a plenary address at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Strasbourg; this was his third invitation to be a plenary speaker.

  61. Francais Francois biography
    • Just over a year later, in September 1792, he was appointed to the chair of mathematics in the College at Strasbourg.

  62. Fields biography
    • The International Mathematical Union was set up in 1920 at the first post war Congress in Strasbourg to run future congresses but, in the aftermath of war, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and Turkey were excluded from the Union.

  63. Rohrbach biography
    • He studied history, geography and theology at Dorpat, Berlin and Strasbourg.

  64. Picard Emile biography
    • Another honour was given to him was making him President of the International Congress of Mathematicians at Strasbourg in September 1920.

  65. Schwarzschild biography
    • Schwarzschild studied at the University of Strasbourg during the two years 1891-93 where he learnt a great deal of practical astronomy, then at the University of Munich where he obtained his doctorate.

  66. Malgrange biography
    • Malgrange was appointed as an assistant lecturer in the Faculty of Sciences at Strasbourg in 1955 and later promoted to Professeur sans chaire.

  67. Jordan biography
    • He was the Honorary President of the International Congress of Mathematicians at Strasbourg in September 1920.

  68. Cassini Jacques biography
    • However, those like Maupertuis who believed that the Earth was flattened at the poles argued ever more strongly against Cassini's theory and, in an attempt to gain further evidence to support his case, Cassini organised another project in 1733, this time to measure the perpendicular to the meridian from Saint-Malo to Strasbourg.

  69. Bachiller biography
    • On one occasion, when Rey Pastor criticized Blas Cabrera, Bachiller defended the latter, saying that while the physicist had accepted a scholarship in Strasbourg, largely at his own expense, Rey Pastor had gone to Argentina "for three pesetas." .

  70. Michler biography
    • She had presented a paper based on her thesis to the K-theory conference held in Strasbourg 29 June 29 - 3 July 1992.

  71. Baker Alan biography
    • He was awarded an honorary doctorate from Universite Louis Pasteur Strasbourg (1998), made an honorary fellow of University College London (1979), a foreign fellow of the Indian Academy of Science (1980), foreign fellow of the National Academy of Sciences India (1993), a member of the Academia Europaea (1998), and an honorary member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (2001).

  72. Pisot biography
    • This town, where Charles was born, is 25 km south west of Strasbourg and, with the rest of Alsace, had been annexed by Germany in 1871 following the Franco-German war of 1870-71.

  73. Hermann biography
    • The beginning of the kinetic theory of gases is usually assigned to the year 1738, when Daniel Bernoulli's 'Hydrodynamica' appeared at Strasbourg.

  74. Robinson G de B biography
    • He had spent the earlier part of the year in Europe, taking part in a workshop in Strasbourg on the symmetric group, then going to Aachen to work with Gordon James and Adalbert Kerber on new edition of his book Representation theory of the symmetric group.

  75. Durer biography
    • Finally Durer returned home, making visits to Colmar and Strasbourg on the way.

  76. Faber biography
    • He remained in Stuttgart until 1912 when he moved to the University of Konigsberg for a year, again moving on, this time to the University of Strasbourg.

  77. Petersson biography
    • In 1941 he went to Strasbourg University and worked there until 1944 when the advancing armies of the allies forced the closure of the university.

  78. Laguerre biography
    • He was commissioned as an artillery officer working on the manufacture of armaments at Mutzig, near Strasbourg, from 1854 to 1864.

  79. Dixmier biography
    • In fact he was fortunate to have Henri Cartan as a lecturer since he was on the faculty at Strasbourg but he could not return there since the Germans controlled the university.

  80. Albertus biography
    • After joining the Dominican Order, he studied and taught at Padua, Bologna, Cologne and other German convents in Hildesheim, Freiburg, Ratisbon, Strasbourg, and Cologne.

  81. Wiener Norbert biography
    • He attended the International Congress of Mathematicians at Strasbourg in 1920 and while there worked with Frechet.

  82. Pincherle biography
    • There were severe political problems, for neither the 1920 Strasbourg Congress nor the 1924 Toronto Congress had not been truly international since German mathematicians had not been allowed to attend due to World War I.

  83. Sturm biography
    • Charles-Francois Sturm's father was Jean-Henri Sturm whose family came from Strasbourg to settle in Geneva about 50 years before Charles-Francois's birth.

  84. Andrews biography
    • Having received an invitation to speak at a conference in Strasbourg, France, he went there from Wisconsin.

  85. Frisi biography
    • Paolo's paternal grandfather, Antonio, was originally from Strasbourg and had arrived in Lombardy as a military man in the Hapsburg army.

  86. Minkowski biography
    • Minkowski married Auguste Adler in Strasbourg in 1897; they had two daughters, Lily born in 1898 and Ruth born in 1902.

  87. Cartier biography
    • Returning to France he was appointed Professor in the faculty of Science at Strasbourg in 1961, remaining there until he moved to the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques at Bures-sur Yvette ten years later.

  88. Malus biography
    • After returning in 1801 Malus held posts in Antwerp, Strasbourg, and Paris.

  89. Rota biography
    • He held four honorary degrees from the University of Strasbourg (1984), the University L'Aquila (1990), the University of Bologna (1996), and Brooklyn Polytechnical University (1997).

  90. Laurent Pierre biography
    • Being late, the memoir was never seriously considered for the Grand Prix, which was won by Pierre Frederic Sarrus (1798-1861), a mathematician working at Strasbourg, with Charles Delaunay's entry receiving an honourable mention, but Cauchy and Liouville were asked to review Laurent's paper and consider it for publication.

  91. Hahn biography
    • Hans was a student at Strasbourg, Munich and Gottingen.

  92. Schramm biography
    • This work led to the solution of many problems by him, many together with his collaborators Greg Lawler now at Cornell University, and Wendelin Werner in Strasbourg, France, as well as by many other mathematical researchers.

  93. Takagi biography
    • Takagi spoke of his work on class field theory, building on Heinrich Weber's work, at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Strasbourg in 1920.

  94. Zeeman biography
    • He has been awarded honorary degrees from many universities including Strasbourg (1974), Hull (1984), Warwick (1988), York (1988), Leeds (1990), Durham (1990) and Hartford (1992).


History Topics

  1. Classical time
    • An early example of such a mechanical clock was the one constructed in Strasbourg between 1352 and 1354.
    • The Clock of the Three Kings was built in Strasbourg Cathedral and stood twelve metres high.
    • Clocks at this time needed to be big so that the weights had a long drop, otherwise the weights required to be wound up frequently, but the Strasbourg clock was more than just a clock for it related time to all its astronomical origins.
    • You can see a picture of the Strasbourg clock.
    • We will return to the Strasbourg astronomical clock in a moment, but first let us consider the 14th century work De proportionibus proportionum by Oresme.
    • The Strasbourg astronomical clock ran for about 150 years before its mechanism failed.
    • Chretien Herlin, an astronomer and professor of mathematics at Strasbourg Academy, was in charge of the project with two assistants who were also mathematicians.
    • Herlin's successor as professor of mathematics at Strasbourg Academy was Conrad Dasypodius and he was now put in charge.
    • Boyle, a great advocate for mathematical descriptions of the world, provided an answer by stating clearly that he believed in a God who could create a mechanical universe which operated with certain laws and he gave as an example the Strasbourg clock.
    • There was a parallel, said Boyle, between the creator of the Strasbourg clock who built a mechanism which ran on its own without the intervention of the builder and the universe made by God which operated according to his laws but without his intervention.

  2. Weil family
    • Bernard came from a family of Jewish merchants and several generations of his family had lived in Strasbourg.
    • Bernard and Selma Weil lived in a Paris apartment on the Rue de Strasbourg, south of the Gare de l'Est when the children were very young.

  3. Bourbaki 1
    • Two young lecturers at the University of Strasbourg are discussing teaching.
    • They are Henri Cartan, who is 29 years old and has been teaching at Strasbourg since 1931, and Andre Weil who was appointed in 1933 and is 27.


Societies etc

  1. International Mathematical Union
    • The first post World War I International Congress of Mathematicians was held in Strasbourg in 1920.


Honours

  1. International Congress Speaker
    • STRASBOURG 1920 .


References

  1. References for Reeb
    • M Audin, Differential geometry, Strasbourg 1953, Notices Amer.
    • R Lutz, Georges Reeb et Jean-Louis Callot, Colloque Trajectorien a la Memoire de Georges Reeb et Jean-Louis Callot, Strasbourg-Obernai, 1995 (Univ.
    • Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, 1995), 1-2.
    • S Sanchez-Pedreľo Guillen, Jean-Louis Callot et Georges Reeb a Murcie, Colloque Trajectorien a la Memoire de Georges Reeb et Jean-Louis Callot, Strasbourg-Obernai, 1995 (Univ.
    • Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, 1995), 17-21.

  2. References for Weber Heinrich
    • N Schappacher and K Volkert, Heinrich Weber: un mathematicien a Strasbourg, 1895-1913, in Sciences et cultures - Les trois universites de Strasbourg 1872-1945 (1998).

  3. References for Fibonacci
    • H Luneburg, Fibonaccis aufsteigende Kettenbruche, ein elegantes Werkzeug mittelalterlicher Rechenkunst, in Seminaire Lotharingien de Combinatoire (Strasbourg, 1991), 135-149.

  4. References for Feldbau
    • La Tribune juive (Strasbourg) (22 July 1932, 12 August 1938, and other editions).

  5. References for Jungius
    • M Fogel, Historia vitae et mortis Joachimi Jungii (Strasbourg, 1658).

  6. References for Loday
    • Jean-Louis Loday (1946-2012), Institut de Recherche Mathematique Avancee, University of Strasbourg.

  7. References for Esclangon
    • A Heck, The Multinational History of Strasbourg Astronomical Observatory (Springer Science & Business Media, 2006).


Additional material

  1. Rota's lecture on 'Mathematical Snapshots
    • When David Benney phoned me last May and ordered me to fly back immediately from Strasbourg to receive the award, I was caught without a premeditated text, and with barely a year to decide what not to say in the Killian lecture.

  2. Weil reviews
    • H Cartan and A Weil were most often geographically far away from each other; Cartan was almost permanently in France, while Weil was involved in the itinerary Paris-Rome-Gottingen-Berlin-Stockholm-India (1930-1932), Marseille-Strasbourg-Finland-Sweden-France (partly in prison in the three countries), then in the USA, 1940-1945, in Sao Paulo (Brazil), 1945-1947, after which he moved again to the USA: Chicago, 1947-1958, and Princeton, 1958-1998.

  3. The Association for Statistics and its Uses
    • After Lausanne, where Marie-Jeanne Laurent-Duhamel is nominated as an honorary member of the Association, the Grenoble congress takes place in 1988 - Georges Morlat will also be recognised as an honorary member - at Rennes in 1989 - who will raise Marie-Jeanne Laurent-Duhamel to be Honorary President - at Tours in 1990 and finally from Strasbourg in 1991 where a new modification of the statutes was established.

  4. Gottingen chairs
    • Heinrich Weber didn't stay at Gottingen for long and moved to Strasbourg in 1895.

  5. Morton's reports
    • In July, 1926, the Department lost the services of Mr D R Williams, M.A., who was elected to a University Fellowship, and is at present pursuing research work at Strasbourg.

  6. Smith's History Papers
    • This is a long street running parallel to the Boulevard de Strasbourg from near the Conservatoire des Arts et Metiers to the Seine.

  7. Bompiani publications
    • Enrico Bompiani, Sur la theorie des connexions, Colloque de Strasbourg (1952).


Quotations

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Famous Curves

  1. Cayleys
    • The name Cayley's sextic is due to R C Archibald who attempted to classify curves in a paper published in Strasbourg in 1900.


Chronology

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EMS Archive

  1. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • Raymond C Archibald studied in Canada, at Harvard and at Strasbourg.

  2. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • Raymond C Archibald studied in Canada, at Harvard and at Strasbourg.


BMC Archive

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Gazetteer of the British Isles

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Astronomy section

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JOC/BS August 2001